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12 nights Italy in july

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  • Nov 8th, 2017 12:46 pm
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[OP]
Sr. Member
Jul 23, 2008
508 posts
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12 nights Italy in july

Hi !
My wife and I already slowly making plans for our next summer trip. This time it would be a first trip in Italy. We only have 12 nights for that trip since we are letting the grandparents taking care of our childs and that we dont want to be away from them for more than 2 weeks.
We are not set on our date but we have 6 weeks in vacation in summer. Our initial plan is something like this
july 8- july 21
arrival in Rome from Montreal, stay 5 nights
Rome-Florence by train and 4 nights in Florence
Florence-venice by train and 4 nights in Venice
Flight from Venice to Montreal (flights are between 12:00 and 13:15 depending the day).
Questions:
1) Should we allows more/less time in some of those places ?
2) should we skip Florence and rent a car between Rome and venice and enjoy contryside (we really love cities and more relax places so anything can fit the bill !)
3) we have found a cruise ship schedule for Venice ( http://crew-center.com/venice-cruise-ship-schedule-2018 )...so we can chose days that gets less boat turist, is it reliable ?
Thanks !
18 replies
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Feb 5, 2009
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I assume summer months are the only option because of the children? just asking because you will be visiting during the hottest months which may not be perfect for sightseeing, and the busiest months.
I am sure there is a lot info online and you will get more help here, but I would suggest going to library and renting Italy/rome and so on travel guides, lots of info in one spot which will help you get going with the plans.
The thing is there is soo much too see that you will have to compromise no matter what. I just came back from the cruise in that region so I may not be able to help that much, but we have stayed in Rome of couple of days and it was unreal, visited Florence and loved it, no comments on other places but I am sure couple of days in the country side or coastal areas (especially during the hottest days of the summer) would give you some time to relax as well.
I apologize if you are familiar with that, but for us downloading walking google maps, and tourist apps ( Rick Stevens Audio Europe was our favourite) was very helpful, what we didn't have was portable phone charger (the one which you can charge few days during the day without plugging), and that would be extremely helpful.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Jul 23, 2008
508 posts
42 upvotes
Thanks Homerhomer for that answer.

We know that summer months is not the ideal time to go to a hot place like Italy, but since i'm a teacher and my wife is a school psychologist it's the only time we got.

That partly why we chose to not take the kids with us this time (after taking them to Germany, Spain and Portugal the last 2 years). That way we can manage the heat be do sightseeing in the morning, go back to the hotel or appartment and go out at night when the heat have fall a bit.
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I think that the amount of time in each city is right. It allows you to see the city, see most of the attractions and even take a day trip or two to someplace outside the city.
For instance, a day trip to Cinque Terre from Rome or Tuscany for a wine tasting or to Sienna and then to the Dolomites or Verona from Venice. One of the highlights of a trip to Italy would be a concert in Verona at the Roman Amphitheater http://www.arena.it/arena/en/season/per ... tival.html. That and it gives you time to relax, sit at a trattoria and watch whatever is going on.
I have to stress that you get as many ticket to sites you want to see beforehand so you can schedule your days and not be in long lines. There are quite a few threads on traveling in Italy with many suggestions and lots of information.
italy-april-any-advice-2076481/#p28292329
10-11-days-italy-do-not-2125262/#p28204100
ask-me-anything-about-italy-2119626/
Is it solipsistic here? Or is it just me?
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Aug 13, 2006
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I went to Italy and did the same itinerary on the first week of July and can attest to how warm and humid it is in Rome, The weather became much more comfortable as you go towards Florence and Venice.

A few tips that you might find useful:
- For Venice, I recommend 2 days max. We stayed 1.5 days and felt we had seen enough and even had time to visit the same places at least twice.
- Venice accommodation is very expensive. I wished we had stayed in Padua. It is only half hr train from Venice and much cheaper. The trains are hourly or so.
- Even though the GPS might say it is only 15 min walk from Venice train station to your accommodation, take into account that you will have to cross a million bridges. We each had a carry on luggage and after going up and down a few (albeit small) bridges it was getting ridiculous. The water taxi is your best bet if you are willing to spend some money but it is SUPER slow.
- Another vote for booking tourist attraction tickets way ahead of your arrival. We looked about 1 month ahead and found Florence and Vatican stuff completely sold out.
- Roma Pass helped us bypass the lines.
- Book train tickets online for best price.
- Before finalizing the ticket, look at the date and time one more time. The TrenItalia site has this sillly thing where it will shift the date automatically if you happen to be buying around midnight. The time is based on YOUR device. It caught us since we purchased it on a device that is on Toronto time.
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seven wrote:
Oct 16th, 2017 3:48 pm
I went to Italy and did the same itinerary on the first week of July and can attest to how warm and humid it is in Rome, The weather became much more comfortable as you go towards Florence and Venice.

A few tips that you might find useful:
- For Venice, I recommend 2 days max. We stayed 1.5 days and felt we had seen enough and even had time to visit the same places at least twice.
- Venice accommodation is very expensive. I wished we had stayed in Padua. It is only half hr train from Venice and much cheaper. The trains are hourly or so.
- Even though the GPS might say it is only 15 min walk from Venice train station to your accommodation, take into account that you will have to cross a million bridges. We each had a carry on luggage and after going up and down a few (albeit small) bridges it was getting ridiculous. The water taxi is your best bet if you are willing to spend some money but it is SUPER slow.
- Another vote for booking tourist attraction tickets way ahead of your arrival. We looked about 1 month ahead and found Florence and Vatican stuff completely sold out.
- Roma Pass helped us bypass the lines.
- Book train tickets online for best price.
- Before finalizing the ticket, look at the date and time one more time. The TrenItalia site has this sillly thing where it will shift the date automatically if you happen to be buying around midnight. The time is based on YOUR device. It caught us since we purchased it on a device that is on Toronto time.
Good information but I take exception with point # 1 " For Venice, I recommend 2 days max. We stayed 1.5 days and felt we had seen enough and even had time to visit the same places at least twice. "
Venice is much more than the walk form Santa Lucia station to Piazza San Marco. That is what most people do and think they saw it all and den it all. In July an afternoon on Lido and the beach is a good thing. The outer Islands (Murano, Burano, Torcella) can easily at up a day and, like I said, a day trip to Verona (or Padua or even Rimini) is another day.
As for hotels, yes, they are expensive in Venice proper but bargains can be found. You can also stay on the mainland in Mestre and save a bunch too but, it is a 10 minute train ride or 15 minute bus ride from the train station or Piazzale Roma just to get back and cool down in your hotel. In Venice, it is just a walk. Venice at night is another place altogether.
Hotels in Venice are everywhere. Try and stay close to the train station and then you won;'t have t walk a lot over cobblestone streets and bridges. If you are going to see Venice, probably only once in your life, why would you stay 50 kms away?
Is it solipsistic here? Or is it just me?
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Feb 19, 2010
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^+1

Venice during the day is one thing. It's entirely another thing at night when the hordes of tourists have vacated. I'd recommend being among those that hang around and see it at night and that means having accommodations there.

It's an incredible place to visit. Don't sell yourself short, OP.
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Oct 22, 2017
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Totally agree with Conquistador! ;)
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And I would say that Venice is also especially magical in the early morning, before most of the tourist hordes have awoken. Make the effort to wake up extra early, see the local workers get ready for the day ahead, and walk through empty piazzas with only the pigeons to keep you company. It's really something else.
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ya Venice is a strange place. Certain hours of the day will be packed with tourists and then all of a sudden everyone are gone.
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Talamasca wrote:
Oct 25th, 2017 6:47 pm
And I would say that Venice is also especially magical in the early morning, before most of the tourist hordes have awoken. Make the effort to wake up extra early, see the local workers get ready for the day ahead, and walk through empty piazzas with only the pigeons to keep you company. It's really something else.
Venice in the morning is especially nice as you say. A morning cappuccino at a trattoria while the early risers stroll by is just wonderful.
A stroll through the markets to see and watch local merchants and restaurateurs get their daily products is really a treat. The Rialto market and in particular the fish market where the days catch from the lagoon and beyond is fought over by the locals. http://rossiwrites.com/italy/italian-li ... sh-market/
I have to say, I love the piazzas again since feeding the pigeons has become a no no and there are less of them.
Is it solipsistic here? Or is it just me?
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Sep 27, 2010
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We did almost the same thing last month. 5 nights in Rome, 5 nights in Florence, 3 nights in Venice. You have a pretty good itinerary. The time frames are good enough to see the touristy things but still have time to just walk around and get lost. I'm really excited for you. It will be amazing!

For Rome, take some time after your sightseeing to rest/nap so you can enjoy it at night as well. It turns into a different city at night.

Florence was amazing. Some people say it's a must, but it is really up to you. You can read up on it and decide whether it is for you or not. There are several easy day trips you can do from there too, like to Sienna, Lucca, or Pisa. I don't think you need to add any more days to Venice.

Venice is crowded during the day. There is no avoiding that. Let it just become part of the experience. But stay on the island proper and you can enjoy it in the early mornings and evenings when the day trippers are not around.

If it is your first time there, I don't think it is a good idea to drive.
Sr. Member
Nov 3, 2002
817 posts
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agree with ghuraba.
All 3 are must sees for a first trip to italy. I would dedicate 3 nights in venice and split the rest of the time in florence and venice. (4-5 nights each)
Take the train, it is easy and always takes you to the centre of town.
Stay in accommodations in the centre. it is worth it and will make all the difference if you can walk everywhere, sites, restaurants, hotels, train station.

Explore on foot and get lost in all of the cities. You will find wonderful things.

And most importantly eat at least one gelato per day.

I like the rick steves books for your first trip.
Jr. Member
Nov 26, 2004
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I will be going to Italy in a month and have a similar itinerary (3nt Palermo, 5nts Rome, 4nts Florence, 3nts Venice). You may want to reduce Venice to 3 nights. I didn't find too many things to do in Venice from my research.

For anyone who has been there, are restaurant reservations needed in Rome and Florence?
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Nov 3, 2002
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kanon wrote:
Nov 6th, 2017 1:04 pm

For anyone who has been there, are restaurant reservations needed in Rome and Florence?
In Rome, head to the Trastevere area at night for dinner, great atmosphere and many good restaurants.
Less touristy and a great place to walk around at night.

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