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$1600 for a cat?

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  • Nov 16th, 2018 8:24 am
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[OP]
Deal Addict
Aug 10, 2013
1272 posts
233 upvotes
Toronto

$1600 for a cat?

I’m looking for a British short hair as I’ve read they are low shedding and that would be ideal for me but they are extremely expensive, are there any cat shelters that would possibly have these?
23 replies
Deal Addict
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Dec 11, 2003
3315 posts
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The Thornhill comm centre has a cat shelter there and they charge about $ 500.00 for a cat with all shots. I think shelters don't really advertise, more of a ymmv.
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Heatware 3-0
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Homer Simpson - Marge, don't discourage the boy! Weaseling out of things is what separates us from animals - except for the weasel.
Sr. Member
Jul 7, 2017
996 posts
333 upvotes
SW corner of the cou…
You can look for a rescue. Purebreds are generally not found at shelters.
Almost too cheap to shop through RFD
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
850 posts
383 upvotes
British Columbia
Why do you want this breed? Low shedding is a relative term and not a guarantee.

I don't see British Shorthairs often at work (I work in a veterinary office) but when I do they frequently have heart problems. One in particular dropped dead when the owner brought it in for sudden breathing difficulties. Can't say I've seen that in the regular cat population. I'd steer clear of them myself, along with Ragdolls and Abyssinians and Persians (and truly any purebred cat). Have met too many unhealthy ones.
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Sep 24, 2006
576 posts
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Guelph, On
True pure breeds have so many health issues - I have a pure breed Himalayan with papers and in 13 years over 3500 in health problems or moew. Tabbies under $250 in vet bills. I have two tabbies now - they don't shed much just brush them and so healthy. Join a rescue facebook group,
Karala wrote:
Sep 4th, 2018 11:53 am
Why do you want this breed? Low shedding is a relative term and not a guarantee.

I don't see British Shorthairs often at work (I work in a veterinary office) but when I do they frequently have heart problems. One in particular dropped dead when the owner brought it in for sudden breathing difficulties. Can't say I've seen that in the regular cat population. I'd steer clear of them myself, along with Ragdolls and Abyssinians and Persians (and truly any purebred cat). Have met too many unhealthy ones.
Jr. Member
Mar 12, 2017
120 posts
156 upvotes
Heavenleigh85 wrote:
Sep 3rd, 2018 6:21 pm
I’m looking for a British short hair as I’ve read they are low shedding and that would be ideal for me but they are extremely expensive, are there any cat shelters that would possibly have these?
Try Toronto Cat Rescue, they have their cats listed on Pet Finder - you can add breed to your search inquiry and it will show cats throughout the province and beyond if you set the search radius far enough. You can also set an alert so when a cat that meets your criteria is posted, you'll receive an email.

If you're looking for a low shedding breed, check out Devon and Cornish Rex as well! As a plug, I have a pure bred Bengal that doesn't shed much and I got him from Toronto Cat Rescue for the princely sum of $100!
[OP]
Deal Addict
Aug 10, 2013
1272 posts
233 upvotes
Toronto
Wow thanks for the info guys I had no idea about the health issues honestly and embarrassingly to admit I fell in love with coby the cat( follow his Insta) and he’s so darn cute I want one just like it . I think in need to do more research for sure
[OP]
Deal Addict
Aug 10, 2013
1272 posts
233 upvotes
Toronto
Karala wrote:
Sep 4th, 2018 11:53 am
Why do you want this breed? Low shedding is a relative term and not a guarantee.

I don't see British Shorthairs often at work (I work in a veterinary office) but when I do they frequently have heart problems. One in particular dropped dead when the owner brought it in for sudden breathing difficulties. Can't say I've seen that in the regular cat population. I'd steer clear of them myself, along with Ragdolls and Abyssinians and Persians (and truly any purebred cat). Have met too many unhealthy ones.
Oh boy rag doll was my second choice lol
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
850 posts
383 upvotes
British Columbia
Heavenleigh85 wrote:
Sep 5th, 2018 2:46 am
Oh boy rag doll was my second choice lol
Why are you set on a purebred? If it is looks based (I'm guessing as now you are swinging to a long haired cat!) then you can find any "look" in a shelter.

A family member got basically a Ragdoll at 6 months old from a shelter without papers. But like I said, Ragdolls have issues. Usually (fatal) cancer at a young age and also heart problems and kidney issues. This cat has had benign mast cell tumors since she was a kitten and one required surgical removal from here ear. Mast cell tumors are noted as more common in this breed. If you look closely you can see one on the left hand side we did not remove; occasionally it bleeds. If it ever requires removal... Bye bye ear! She's only 4.

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[OP]
Deal Addict
Aug 10, 2013
1272 posts
233 upvotes
Toronto
Karala wrote:
Sep 5th, 2018 11:33 am
Why are you set on a purebred? If it is looks based (I'm guessing as now you are swinging to a long haired cat!) then you can find any "look" in a shelter.

A family member got basically a Ragdoll at 6 months old from a shelter without papers. But like I said, Ragdolls have issues. Usually (fatal) cancer at a young age and also heart problems and kidney issues. This cat has had benign mast cell tumors since she was a kitten and one required surgical removal from here ear. Mast cell tumors are noted as more common in this breed. If you look closely you can see one on the left hand side we did not remove; occasionally it bleeds. If it ever requires removal... Bye bye ear! She's only 4.

Image
So pretty I just love the look of them
Sr. Member
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Sep 24, 2006
576 posts
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Guelph, On
When you get long hair and some breeds - lots of fur and longs of problems.
Tabbys by far are the healthiest and easier to care for.
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Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
850 posts
383 upvotes
British Columbia
Heavenleigh85 wrote:
Sep 5th, 2018 12:21 pm
So pretty I just love the look of them
Yes she is quite the looker while she has two ears at any rate...

The key is to get a cat based on personality, not looks or its likelihood of shedding (hint: they all shed, you'll have to brush them regardless). It's the personality you'll be stuck with. As I mentioned, breed personalities are frequently something of a crapshoot, so just go to a shelter and find a cat that you feel connected to... You're going to love it no matter its coloring.

Long haired cats need lots of brushing, sometimes their fur tangles faster than you can brush it out. They also shed plenty and can run into some unpleasant issues with their poop stuck to their fur. Sometimes they require "lion cuts" when they get super matted... If I had a choice I would not choose a long haired cat.
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Oct 3, 2004
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There's nothing wrong with getting a purebred, just make sure you get one from a reputable breeder and not just some backyard breeder looking to make a quick buck. My family has had cats for over 50 years, some purebred and some from shelters and you shouldn't listen to blanket statements like purebreds are all bad as everyone's experiences are different such as not one of our purebreds ever had any issues yet the majority of the shelter cats we had did have major medical issues but I'm not going to come on here and say don't get a shelter cat as they all have issues as that may have been my experience but it doesn't mean they all do.

Also we have had and currently do have Ragdolls and none of them have ever had any issues, and this is over the last 25 years but again make sure you get them from a reputable breeder as many people try to pass theirs off as purebred and from good lineage but they aren't.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Aug 10, 2013
1272 posts
233 upvotes
Toronto
swales wrote:
Sep 6th, 2018 7:58 am
There's nothing wrong with getting a purebred, just make sure you get one from a reputable breeder and not just some backyard breeder looking to make a quick buck. My family has had cats for over 50 years, some purebred and some from shelters and you shouldn't listen to blanket statements like purebreds are all bad as everyone's experiences are different such as not one of our purebreds ever had any issues yet the majority of the shelter cats we had did have major medical issues but I'm not going to come on here and say don't get a shelter cat as they all have issues as that may have been my experience but it doesn't mean they all do.

Also we have had and currently do have Ragdolls and none of them have ever had any issues, and this is over the last 25 years but again make sure you get them from a reputable breeder as many people try to pass theirs off as purebred and from good lineage but they aren't.
This brings me to my other Question how would I know? I suspect a lot of people on Kijiji are trying to pass off their long haired tabby kittens as Himalayan and ragdoll mix etc how would I know do I request papers or only buy from those that say tica registered?
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
850 posts
383 upvotes
British Columbia
swales wrote:
Sep 6th, 2018 7:58 am
There's nothing wrong with getting a purebred, just make sure you get one from a reputable breeder and not just some backyard breeder looking to make a quick buck.
Naturally not every cat is going to have issues. However it is simply a fact that the higher genetic diversity, the higher likelihood you will have a healthier animal.

Genetic Anomalies of Cats & Pros and Cons of Inbreeding

Of particular interest:
To produce cats which closely meet the breed standard, breeders commonly mate together animals which are related and which share desirable characteristics. Over time, sometimes only one or two generations, those characteristics will become homozygous (genetically uniform) and all offspring of the inbred animal will inherit the genes for those characteristics (breed true). Breeders can predict how the offspring will look. "Line-breeding" is not a term used by geneticists, but comes from livestock husbandry. It indicates milder forms of inbreeding. Line-breeding is still a form of inbreeding i.e. breeding within a family line and includes cousin/cousin, aunt/nephew, niece/uncle and grandparent/grandchild. The difference between line-breeding and inbreeding may be defined differently for different species of animals and even for different breeds within the same species. It is complicated by the fact that a cat's half-brother might also be her father!
However, inbreeding holds potential problems. The limited gene-pool caused by continued inbreeding means that deleterious genes become widespread and the breed loses vigour. Laboratory animal suppliers depend on this to create uniform strains of animal which are immuno-depressed or breed true for a particular disorder e.g. epilepsy. Such animals are so inbred as to be genetically identical (clones!), a situation normally only seen in identical twins. Similarly, a controlled amount of inbreeding can be used to fix desirable traits in farm livestock e.g. milk yield, lean/fat ratios, rate of growth etc. In human terms, inbreeding is considered incest; cats do not have incest taboos.

...

The more that inbreeding is used to get rid of undesirable traits or to fix a desirable trait, the more likely it is that individuals will also inherit the same set of genes for the immune system from both parents, and be born with less vigourous immune systems. The immune system problem is compounded over successive generations as the animals become genetically more uniform (like the cheetah). According to one theory, immunodeficiency may be caused by a simple lack of heterozygosity in the genes that control the immune system. This is why random-bred cats are generally so robust.

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When cats are bred for appearance, disease-causing genes risk being overlooked until the gene becomes sufficiently widespread that numerous cases of the genetic ailment appear in that breed.

...

Some breeds don’t have a high number of genetic conditions noted, but they show inbreeding depression (in the form of small litters, poor fertility, poor immune systems). The Singapura is so inbred (developed from less than 10 foundation cats) that it risks becoming extinct without outcrossing to unrelated cats.
While this is not related to cats, I found it fascinating:
There have been numerous studies into inbreeding and viability. Mandarte Island, off Vancouver, Canada is so tiny that every single song sparrow can be ringed, monitored and matings recorded. Researchers know exactly how inbred each individual is. When severe winter storms wiped out over 90% of the birds, Lukas Keller of Zurich University, Switzerland found that all inbred individuals were killed. He defined "inbred" as matings between first cousins or closer. Loeske Kruuk, Edinburgh University, Scotland found that collared flycatchers born from brother-sister matings were more than 90% less likely to survive to maturity than offspring of non-incestuous matings. Ilkka Hanski of Helsinki University, Finland found that 50% of male offspring of brother-sister matings in a certain species of African butterfly were sterile.
Getting a cat from a "good" breeder means nothing when the genetic makeup of that breed is compromised. It isn't something the breeder can prevent. Some things can be genetically tested for but many cannot.

Moreover, when you weigh the fact that there are countless cats living and breathing and starving in the streets, I can easily come in here and say to not to spend your money on a purebred. Most of my cats have simply been strays and they have been fantastic cats.

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