Parenting & Family

2 yr old doesn't speak

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 11th, 2017 12:28 pm
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Deal Fanatic
Nov 11, 2008
6953 posts
956 upvotes
Is he in daycare? Do you read books to him every night? Sing? Do you have one on one conversations on a daily basis? These things can help with language.
Deal Addict
Jun 21, 2016
1407 posts
481 upvotes
philharmonic wrote:
May 9th, 2017 4:57 pm
I'm not adding to the discussion, but just wanted to dispel this persistent myth. Einstein spoke in complete sentences at some point between two and three years of age. Source.
eh parents believe anything the doctors say to make them feel better, no harm in it
"if your kid isn't talking don't worry! Einstein and bill gates started at 4 and they're genius'!"
Member
Jun 25, 2011
278 posts
101 upvotes
Alberta
My son had issue with speech delay. He did not talk anything meaningful till he was over 4 years old. We got concerned when he was 2 years old and had severe speech delay. His hearing was tested and was send to pediatrician. Everything was normal. In the pre-school he was assigned a speech therapist who worked with him for an year. In Kindergarden, he was still very late in talking and he had speech therapist coming from school one a week and finally he picked up talking when he turned out to be in grade 1.
Member
Oct 16, 2007
288 posts
6 upvotes
Speaking from experience, if you've created a thread, it means there is some concern. If you are concerned, don't let anyone tell you not to be concerned, including your pediatrician, IMO. There are speech pathologist services everywhere now that can help you understand and assess the situation. Typically these services are covered under a basic employee insurance benefits. If the speech pathologist says you have nothing to worry about, then great! If they recommend that you do speech therapy, then you can make a decision to do it or not.

My child showed us signs of slow speech development. Pediatrician recommended to go see an Ears Nose Throat doctor who then recommended that we get tubes (surgery). It was a 5-minute surgery. Since the tubes, we started to see very quick speech development. Throughout the entire time, we also saw two speech pathologists. One privately and one through the City of Toronto Early Abilities program. We don't regret having done all of that. But you should make the best decision for yourself that will bring you peace of mind.
Member
Oct 16, 2007
288 posts
6 upvotes
The biggest lesson that we as parents learned from speech pathologists is to narrate your lives. Now that is probably a very simple lesson and one that makes a lot of sense, but it is a very difficult thing to do well. "we're walking to the playground." "wow, a big, brown dog is walking too." "it's time to go down the long yellow slide" This, along with eye contact, physically coming down to their level/height, and showing your mouth moving is very important. Read in front of them rather than from behind them (sitting in your lap). When they bring you something, tell them what they brought you and describe it.
All the best!
Deal Addict
Feb 4, 2003
1970 posts
92 upvotes
Was your child a preemie baby? My doctor said that can delay them up to 3 month.
Member
User avatar
Jul 29, 2007
402 posts
103 upvotes
North America
Any update from the OP? Seems the original poster hasn't provided any further details.
You shouldn't need to worry as my son also was a late talker. He's doing fine now at 4.

He started talking about about 3 years of age, so it's nothing to worry about at all...
He's a passive little guy, scared of loud noises and even fellow preschoolers singing!

We bring him to the doc for anything and everything, nothing seems to be "wrong".
People differ in all aspects of motor and sensory learning, time will tell, just keep him busy with preschool!
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[OP]
Jr. Member
Oct 27, 2013
149 posts
30 upvotes
MISSISSAUGA
Thanks for the feedback. As an update my son had a hearing test and all normal. He has seen a speech therapist about 5 times. She thinks it's delayed speech and nothing more. He tries to say words but doesn't articulate very well. We'll continue to monitor see how things go.

Thanks
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jul 14, 2008
7552 posts
1171 upvotes
Ontario
Every case is obviously different, but just to add a little encouragement. My brother who is over 40 had a similar issue. Didn't speak first 3 years of his life.

NOW, we can't get him to shut up! :)

Hope it works out.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Apr 29, 2008
5804 posts
1585 upvotes
Montreal
newby1983 wrote:
Jul 9th, 2017 9:54 pm
Thanks for the feedback. As an update my son had a hearing test and all normal. He has seen a speech therapist about 5 times. She thinks it's delayed speech and nothing more. He tries to say words but doesn't articulate very well. We'll continue to monitor see how things go.
My 2 year old saw speech therapist too.
You do the right thing by going there, by doing everything you can.
drokli wrote:
Jun 27th, 2017 9:48 am
The biggest lesson that we as parents learned from speech pathologists is to narrate your lives.
Good point, I was told that too... I did it already, but was encouraged to continue.
Member
Feb 26, 2016
419 posts
61 upvotes
my wife signed up for a speech therapist for my son very early on (when he was about 15 months). We knew that there was a long wait time so we signed him up just in case. Just before 2, we finally got him with a speech therapist. Although at this time, we didn't think he needed it (as he was saying a couple of words), we thought it's was a good idea anyway. Although, the therapist mentioned that he is a bit slower than the norm, she wasn't worried and gave good suggestions. We used to always ask him yes or no questions and he would either nod or say yes or no. A good suggestion by the speech therapist was to stop asking him these types of binary questions but instead ask him what he wants and have him try to communicate it. we thought this helped quite a bit.
Member
Dec 25, 2010
254 posts
22 upvotes
Toronto
otaknap wrote:
Jul 10th, 2017 4:04 pm
my wife signed up for a speech therapist for my son very early on (when he was about 15 months). We knew that there was a long wait time so we signed him up just in case. Just before 2, we finally got him with a speech therapist. Although at this time, we didn't think he needed it (as he was saying a couple of words), we thought it's was a good idea anyway. Although, the therapist mentioned that he is a bit slower than the norm, she wasn't worried and gave good suggestions. We used to always ask him yes or no questions and he would either nod or say yes or no. A good suggestion by the speech therapist was to stop asking him these types of binary questions but instead ask him what he wants and have him try to communicate it. we thought this helped quite a bit.
I'm curious about what made you seek out a speech therapist at 15 months. What in particular concerned you?

I have a 15 month old and I, like every parent, sometimes get worried that my child is a little behind. He can say about 6-7 words now, but not very clearly. I know he's quite young but I don't want to miss any warning signs.

We have a 3 year old too and his speech developed so quickly between 18-20 months that I try not to get too antsy about the youngest.
Member
Feb 26, 2016
419 posts
61 upvotes
D_J_M wrote:
Jul 15th, 2017 10:27 pm
I'm curious about what made you seek out a speech therapist at 15 months. What in particular concerned you?

I have a 15 month old and I, like every parent, sometimes get worried that my child is a little behind. He can say about 6-7 words now, but not very clearly. I know he's quite young but I don't want to miss any warning signs.

We have a 3 year old too and his speech developed so quickly between 18-20 months that I try not to get too antsy about the youngest.
he wasn't saying the number of words that the doctor said he should being saying. similar to your child, he was able to say a few words but not clearly. since the wait time was long, we thought there was no harm signing him up earlier. if his speech improved, we could always just cancel the speech therapist appointment vs seeking one out when he was older when the issue became more prevalent. to give you an idea, we signed him up for speech therapy at 15 months and did not get an appointment until he was 22 months. again similar to your situation, his speech developed quickly around 20-22 months.
Jr. Member
Feb 3, 2013
127 posts
49 upvotes
GREENWOOD
Maybe he doesn't want to speak. Do you force the issue or just give him whatever he wants without requiring him to speak?
Member
Aug 30, 2010
256 posts
202 upvotes
Toronto
My daughter didn't seem to be speaking as much as other kids her age. I didn't know if she was delayed or not but she had less words and I wanted to deal with it ASAP. I used
Toronto Preschool Speech and Language Services 416-338-8255 and there was no charge. She did group classes of 3 kids (they have different locations) which actually gave ME a lot of tools for helping her language. By 3 I took her to a private speech therapist for an assessment and she was ahead of her age.

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