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2017 Winter Tire Rebates

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  • Sep 21st, 2017 4:55 pm
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Roger21 wrote:
Sep 12th, 2017 3:27 pm
That is odd because most reviews suggest otherwise.

I will go again with new WS80's, hard to beat them for that price.
I had Michelin X-Ice tires on my pickup truck for the last 3 or 4 winters. They are nice and quiet, and work well in non snowy conditions. No squirmy handling, or loud noise. The snow and ice performance was fine, though not mind blowing. With 4 wheel drive, I did not have to worry about deep snow. We almost never get more than a foot of snow at a time in St. Catharines anyway. They worked way better in cold rainy conditions than my winter rated Dunlop RVXT A/T tires.

As the Michelins wore out, I decided to run them down this summer, since they did not have another winter left in them. Not shockingly, they wore out really fast. Had I rotated them, maybe I could have got to the start of this coming winter, but they did not make it. My front tires had insufficient tread depth to make it through heavy rain conditions without hydroplane risk. I'll definitely be getting an alignment when I get my new tires too, since the wear was not as even as it should have been.
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Batcave
Are 17s really that bad for winters? I was planning on using my WRX's stock rims for the winter because I want to buy new rims for the summer.

I still can't decide between WS80s vs Hakka 9 studded... is the higher premium really worth it?
“Nothing harms me. But I know pain. I know pain. Sometimes I share it. With someone like you.” - Batman . . . . .
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FalconR wrote:
Sep 12th, 2017 4:24 pm
Are 17s really that bad for winters? I was planning on using my WRX's stock rims for the winter because I want to buy new rims for the summer.

I still can't decide between WS80s vs Hakka 9 studded... is the higher premium really worth it?
Relevant to the vehicle. So while yes, 17" will be fine, 16" or 15" will be better and most importantly, cheaper.

I go from 20" to 18" on the big vehicle, and from 17" to 15" on the little one.
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QTheNukes wrote:
Sep 12th, 2017 3:11 pm
Smaller inches is always better, huge savings and better in snow. You might have a 16inch option on that car as well. I have always gone from 17's to 15's on my cars - half the price
+1, always go for smaller tire if you can as they are cheaper. You just need to make sure that the smaller wheel clears your brake caliper.
marktang wrote:
Sep 12th, 2017 3:16 pm
always go smaller for snow tires. first hand experience with my Kia. 17s aren't that good in the snow at all.
Smaller wheel diameter doesn't make a difference in the snow. The tread contact with the snow is essentially the same. Smaller wheel is just cheaper. Downside is looks (if you care) and worse dry handling due to taller sidewall. Smaller width can help bite into the snow.
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FalconR wrote:
Sep 12th, 2017 4:24 pm
Are 17s really that bad for winters? I was planning on using my WRX's stock rims for the winter because I want to buy new rims for the summer.
I still can't decide between WS80s vs Hakka 9 studded... is the higher premium really worth it?
Nothing wrong with running 17 or larger in the winter as wheel diameter as sidewall height has little effect on a properly inflated tire's tread. I run winters on my 17's and know many running winters on 18 or 19's. Downside is the cost goes way up.
Gutty96 wrote:
Sep 12th, 2017 4:35 pm
Relevant to the vehicle. So while yes, 17" will be fine, 16" or 15" will be better and most importantly, cheaper.
I go from 20" to 18" on the big vehicle, and from 17" to 15" on the little one.
You'll have to explain to me how smaller sizes are better in the winter. Only thing I can think of is if you air them way down, off-road style to reduce ground pressure, but that would destroy your tire at anything other that rock crawling speed, and car tires still won't have a tall enough or strong enough sidewall to want to do that.
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May 26, 2005
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engineered wrote:
Sep 12th, 2017 5:58 pm

You'll have to explain to me how smaller sizes are better in the winter. Only thing I can think of is if you air them way down, off-road style to reduce ground pressure, but that would destroy your tire at anything other that rock crawling speed, and car tires still won't have a tall enough or strong enough sidewall to want to do that.
I'm thinking more sidewall flex = more adhesion on snow?
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engineered wrote:
Sep 12th, 2017 5:58 pm
Nothing wrong with running 17 or larger in the winter as wheel diameter as sidewall height has little effect on a properly inflated tire's tread. I run winters on my 17's and know many running winters on 18 or 19's. Downside is the cost goes way up.


You'll have to explain to me how smaller sizes are better in the winter. Only thing I can think of is if you air them way down, off-road style to reduce ground pressure, but that would destroy your tire at anything other that rock crawling speed, and car tires still won't have a tall enough or strong enough sidewall to want to do that.
I think it has more to so with narrower tires cutting down to the road while wider tires will be more prone to float and slide around on the snow.

Smaller rimed tires also tend to be narrower.

Oh ya, and also cheaper. Did anyone mention that yet?
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roastpuff wrote:
Sep 12th, 2017 6:28 pm
I'm thinking more sidewall flex = more adhesion on snow?
Don't think so. Even according to tirerack.com they suggest going narrower to improve snow traction. They say going smaller diameter only helps with cost and comfort/rim protection.
https://blog.tirerack.com/blog/turk-t/s ... for-winter
https://blog.tirerack.com/blog/make-dri ... ter-wheels
"Smaller diameter wheels typically allow for a narrower tire, which results in better winter traction."
I run 17in winter tires on my stock rims, and 18in summer tires on aftermarket rims. I'd happily go 16in for winter tires if I had 16in rims just for the cost savings.

Now one factor related to sidewall height is the availability of winter tires. If you're running wide 19's on on a sports car, you may not be able to find a non-performance oriented winter tire, only performance winter tires, which handle better the cold dry, but worse in the snow. Going to a small 17 with a taller sidewall will open up your options for more snow capable tires, at the expense of squirmy dry pavement handling.
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Mar 21, 2009
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Hamilton
Did the simplytire group buy die off? because they had good deals and were excellent service. Fwiw I have the Altimax on a RAV4 and they are excellent. Tire rack used to list them as the highest value winter tire.
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EK75 wrote:
Sep 12th, 2017 10:28 pm
Did the simplytire group buy die off? because they had good deals and were excellent service. Fwiw I have the Altimax on a RAV4 and they are excellent. Tire rack used to list them as the highest value winter tire.
@lilpoorpk posted in SimplyTire 2016/17 WinterTire & Wheel Package Price Lists thread

"I did e-mail Allen last week and he did say he will continue with gb this year...probably busy setting it up right now. so be patient"
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I've used the Yokohama IceGuards for the past few winters and they've been great. Haven't been stuck yet
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engineered wrote:
Sep 12th, 2017 5:58 pm
Nothing wrong with running 17 or larger in the winter as wheel diameter as sidewall height has little effect on a properly inflated tire's tread. I run winters on my 17's and know many running winters on 18 or 19's. Downside is the cost goes way up.


You'll have to explain to me how smaller sizes are better in the winter. Only thing I can think of is if you air them way down, off-road style to reduce ground pressure, but that would destroy your tire at anything other that rock crawling speed, and car tires still won't have a tall enough or strong enough sidewall to want to do that.
The larger wheel / low profile tire is slightly more likely to pack snow into the spokes / around the the rim. If this snow is not cleared, it can affect the balance of your tires, and cause vibration at high speed.

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Konowl wrote:
Sep 12th, 2017 3:16 pm
Should have quoted in your original post.
Thanks, Captain Obvious.
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starchoice wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 9:40 am
Thanks, Captain Obvious.
There's no need to be rude; I was simply indicating your post would have made more sense if you had quoted whom you were responding too.

If it was that obvious.... why didn't you do it LOL.
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Konowl wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 9:55 am
There's no need to be rude; I was simply indicating your post would have made more sense if you had quoted whom you were responding too.

If it was that obvious.... why didn't you do it LOL.
Why do what's obvious? It referred to the preceding post.

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