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[2018 UPDATE] Ask me anything about home electrical requirements, electrical code, wiring, devices

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Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
7233 posts
566 upvotes
Toronto
BouncyBall wrote:
Apr 19th, 2017 10:06 am
Does Toronto have local addendums to the code that makes this statement true?
Reading the 2015 CEC - there are far more than just "one and only one circuit" that can be 'non-arc fault protected....one of them being that kitchen island!

Rule 26-742
Item (f) requires that all branch circuits supplying 125 V receptacles rated 20 A or less be protected by a
combination-type arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI). See Figure 26-31.
Item (f)(i) allows branch circuits supplying receptacles installed in accordance with Rules 26-710(f)
(receptacles in bathrooms and washrooms), 26-712(d)(i) (receptacles for kitchen refrigerators), and
26-712(d)(iii), (iv), and (v) (receptacles along the wall of a kitchen counter work surface, a permanently fixed
island counter
, and a peninsular counter) to be exempt from the requirement for arc-fault protection. The
rationale for the circuits supplying receptacles installed in accordance with Rule 26-712(d)(i) is that if a nuisance
trip goes unnoticed, the frozen food in the freezer can spoil. The rationale for the rest is that these either may
be, or are, the circuits that are required to have ground-fault protection.
Let me clarify. I meant general purpose circuits that must be arc faulted. There are exceptions to the arc fault rule, but in general most house circuits now need to be arc faulted. So of those circuits that need to be arc faulted, you get to get away with one more non-arc faulted when you put the smokes on it.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
7233 posts
566 upvotes
Toronto
PianoGuy wrote:
Apr 19th, 2017 8:04 pm
Redoing the electric in my garage. It currently has a single 15A circuit. Number of new light fixtures plus receptacles is more than 12 and I need an outdoor receptacle, so I guess I need to put in a sub panel so I can have a total of three circuits. I would like a 15A for the lights and 2 20A for the receptacles.

1) The house currently has 100 Amp service. What is the maximum service the sub panel can have?

2) Based on 2 20A circuits and one 15A circuit, what is the minimum service the sub panel can have?

3) This https://www.lowes.ca/panel-boxes/eaton- ... 34192.html says it's a 100 amp panel. Can I feed it with 8/3 wire from https://www.lowes.ca/breakers/eaton-typ ... 36539.html this breaker? In other words, it can be less than 100 amp, right?
You should put in a subpanel regardless if you can. It's just a good idea. Your main panel governs the maximum size breaker it can take. Keeping it economical and easy you should be able to run 8/3 AC90 for < $5/m. The premium over NMD90 is small and the armoring is worthwhile for protecting the wire in the garage if it's going to be surface mounted. 8/3 is good for 50A, and you should feed it that from your main panel. I assume you're going Eaton because your main panel is Eaton. That subpanel is fine. 100A is a max, you can feed it 50A no problem. You'll want 50A for a future car charger or high amperate/240v loads in the garage. As it stands you're only going to load 20A onto one phase and 35A onto the other so you have tons of overhead for additions.
Jr. Member
Jan 30, 2015
189 posts
73 upvotes
Toronto
I need to drill a hole in the upper track of a short run of steel studs to get a cable to a light switch. It doesn't need to pass through any studs, just come in through the track and down the face of one of them. I presume the correct approach is to drill and put a grommet in the hole through the track. However, a bag of grommets is about $15 and I only need one! Am I allowed to cut an 8" section of 2x4, rip it to width and secure this between the track. Then drill through the track and stud section? Seems to me that this would be no different than running it through a wood top plate because there are no exposed edges of metal to rub on the romex?
Penalty Box
Dec 9, 2003
4212 posts
442 upvotes
Calgary
New House build. I only need 200A right now but maybe more in the future.

Can I run a 200A supply and panel right now and also just run spare wires for a future second 200A supply (ie no panel or hook up to hydro until the future) I just want to run the wires to avoid digging up the driveway later.

I see discussion that 2x200 panels is OK in the US but not sure what Canadian rules are (BC if it makes any difference)
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Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
7233 posts
566 upvotes
Toronto
Cough wrote:
Apr 19th, 2017 11:35 pm
New House build. I only need 200A right now but maybe more in the future.

Can I run a 200A supply and panel right now and also just run spare wires for a future second 200A supply (ie no panel or hook up to hydro until the future) I just want to run the wires to avoid digging up the driveway later.

I see discussion that 2x200 panels is OK in the US but not sure what Canadian rules are (BC if it makes any difference)
You can do 2x200 panels here but that's a 400 service. You need to talk to your local utility about the costs of a 200 vs 400 service - it's sometimes not an issue, it's sometimes an issue where the transformer on the street can't supply enough power or is too far away to supply you that much power. You're only allowed one meter here, so in order to do 2x200 you need a 400 service indeed. The utility will be able to tell you all of their requirements that you will be responsible for - trenching, conduits, etc (assuming you have underground service) - and costs for the stuff they have to do for you to get you the service you want. They'll do up a proposal and you can decide what to do from there.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
7233 posts
566 upvotes
Toronto
Lacklustre wrote:
Apr 19th, 2017 9:15 pm
I need to drill a hole in the upper track of a short run of steel studs to get a cable to a light switch. It doesn't need to pass through any studs, just come in through the track and down the face of one of them. I presume the correct approach is to drill and put a grommet in the hole through the track. However, a bag of grommets is about $15 and I only need one! Am I allowed to cut an 8" section of 2x4, rip it to width and secure this between the track. Then drill through the track and stud section? Seems to me that this would be no different than running it through a wood top plate because there are no exposed edges of metal to rub on the romex?
Either that or BX.
Jr. Member
Jan 30, 2015
189 posts
73 upvotes
Toronto
Drew_W wrote:
Apr 20th, 2017 9:04 am
Either that or BX.
Thanks, I was considering that, but I only need about 8ft and i'd have to spend money on the cable, get connectors for the box and stripping it is a pain..... I'll go the wood route and if the inspector complains, i'll break down and buy a bag of grommets!
Member
Jul 2, 2013
268 posts
27 upvotes
Newmarket
Lacklustre wrote:
Apr 19th, 2017 9:15 pm
I need to drill a hole in the upper track of a short run of steel studs to get a cable to a light switch. It doesn't need to pass through any studs, just come in through the track and down the face of one of them. I presume the correct approach is to drill and put a grommet in the hole through the track. However, a bag of grommets is about $15 and I only need one! Am I allowed to cut an 8" section of 2x4, rip it to width and secure this between the track. Then drill through the track and stud section? Seems to me that this would be no different than running it through a wood top plate because there are no exposed edges of metal to rub on the romex?
Well if I was an inspector and saw this, I would question the rest of your work and inspect it with a fine tooth comb.
Newbie
May 13, 2015
28 posts
7 upvotes
question regarding code approved grounding.

Is it okay to connect the ground wires in a metal box to a grounding screw, without having to pigtail to one another? On the source cable, I kept the ground wire long, wrapped it around a ground screw and attached it directly to the receptacle. On the other wire, I connected the ground to the other available ground screw (no pigtail).

Would this pass inspection?
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Last edited by sniggity on Apr 20th, 2017 3:19 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Member
Jan 14, 2012
224 posts
22 upvotes
KITCHENER
Supperfly wrote: ↑ Can all this be wired on 1 circuit?

Want to wire a bathroom: So 1 GFCI outlet with two plugs, one vanity box with two lights, 2 potlights and exhaust fan? Is that allowed?

Thanks for any help you may have
Drew_W wrote:
Apr 14th, 2017 9:14 pm
Sure you can. Do you want to? If you trip the circuit with a hair dryer or whatever do you want to be left in the dark?
Thank for the reply. How would you wire it differently?
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 19, 2008
5069 posts
954 upvotes
Whitby
Supperfly wrote:
Apr 20th, 2017 1:28 pm
. How would you wire it differently?
Put the lights on a seperate circuit than GFCI if possible
Jr. Member
Oct 16, 2014
190 posts
13 upvotes
North York, ON
I bought an LED strip light for my powder room.

Should I wire the switch to the DC wire, or the the AC wire?

I'm wanting to wire the switch to the DC wire, because I hate working with solid Romex wires.
Newbie
May 8, 2011
80 posts
4 upvotes
Toronto
Hello there,

I have a question about light fixture and suspended ceiling. I want to use regular light fixture on suspended ceiling in a basement room. What's the correct method (will pass inspection) to install a light fixture junction box to suspended ceiling?

Thanks!
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 23, 2004
1624 posts
191 upvotes
Montreal
sniggity wrote:
Apr 20th, 2017 1:26 pm
question regarding code approved grounding.

Is it okay to connect the ground wires in a metal box to a grounding screw, without having to pigtail to one another? On the source cable, I kept the ground wire long, wrapped it around a ground screw and attached it directly to the receptacle. On the other wire, I connected the ground to the other available ground screw (no pigtail).

Would this pass inspection?
Your ground wires look fine. They are both connected to the grounding screws in the box and then one of them is going to the switch. All good.

But for your black and white wires, why do you have them going to a marette and then have a third wire going to the receptacle? Just connect both wires to the receptacle directly.
Newbie
May 13, 2015
28 posts
7 upvotes
AMD wrote:
Apr 20th, 2017 4:55 pm
Your ground wires look fine. They are both connected to the grounding screws in the box and then one of them is going to the switch. All good.

But for your black and white wires, why do you have them going to a marette and then have a third wire going to the receptacle? Just connect both wires to the receptacle directly.
Thanks, reason for the 3rd wire is to avoid the downstream boxes from loosing power if just the receptacle fails.

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