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[2018 UPDATE] Ask me anything about home electrical requirements, electrical code, wiring, devices

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  • Dec 14th, 2017 12:13 am
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Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
7233 posts
566 upvotes
Toronto
sniggity wrote:
Apr 20th, 2017 1:26 pm
question regarding code approved grounding.

Is it okay to connect the ground wires in a metal box to a grounding screw, without having to pigtail to one another? On the source cable, I kept the ground wire long, wrapped it around a ground screw and attached it directly to the receptacle. On the other wire, I connected the ground to the other available ground screw (no pigtail).

Would this pass inspection?
Why are you pigtailing instead of going through the receptacle in the second photo with the plastic box?
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
7233 posts
566 upvotes
Toronto
sniggity wrote:
Apr 20th, 2017 6:30 pm
Thanks, reason for the 3rd wire is to avoid the downstream boxes from loosing power if just the receptacle fails.
This will never happen. EVER. Go through the receptacle like is done 99.9999999999999999999999999999% of the time. MWBC are pretty much the only exception I can think of.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
7233 posts
566 upvotes
Toronto
Zamboni wrote:
Apr 20th, 2017 2:58 pm
Put the lights on a seperate circuit than GFCI if possible
Winner winner chicken dinner!
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
7233 posts
566 upvotes
Toronto
buliwyf wrote:
Apr 20th, 2017 4:02 pm
I bought an LED strip light for my powder room.

Should I wire the switch to the DC wire, or the the AC wire?

I'm wanting to wire the switch to the DC wire, because I hate working with solid Romex wires.
As an under vanity light? I dunno. How do you want to be able to turn it on? Usually those are put on high voltage occupancy sensors. Where are you plugging in the LED strip?
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
7233 posts
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Toronto
CBA wrote:
Apr 20th, 2017 4:49 pm
Hello there,

I have a question about light fixture and suspended ceiling. I want to use regular light fixture on suspended ceiling in a basement room. What's the correct method (will pass inspection) to install a light fixture junction box to suspended ceiling?

Thanks!
https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.adju ... 85667.html
Member
Jan 14, 2012
224 posts
22 upvotes
KITCHENER
Zamboni wrote:
Apr 20th, 2017 2:58 pm
Put the lights on a seperate circuit than GFCI if possible
So bathroom GFCI plug should only be on its own, correct?
Deal Addict
May 26, 2011
1792 posts
462 upvotes
Vancouver
"Should" be but is not required by code to be.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Mar 3, 2011
620 posts
509 upvotes
markopas wrote:
Apr 12th, 2017 12:31 pm
I also purchased a set of pot lights from Costco to take advantage of the energy savings coupons that is going on right now (always wanted pot lights and not the crappy builder lights), how do I determine how many pot lights I can put on that one switch, do I just take the current wattage that the existing light is using and then divide that by the wattage the new led potlights will use. If I remember correctly, the existing light says 60w max and has two bulbs, does that mean I have a max of 120w to play with? If each LED pot light is 8w and I am only putting up 6, that should relieve any stress on the breaker panel right?
Never got an answer on the above and hope someone can answer please.

From my understanding if I put pot lights in I should put them all on a new circuit on the breaker so that they are not tied in the existing lights and receptacles.
Deal Addict
May 26, 2011
1792 posts
462 upvotes
Vancouver
Drew, thanks for replying to my earlier post. I have a few more questions for you (or anyone) if you have the time to answer.

1) When I did my unfinished basement, I ran NMD90 on the side of studs like this https://cdn2.tmbi.com/TFH/Step-By-Step/ ... GAR_04.jpg so that someone wouldn't be tempted to use them to hang stuff off or something. This passed inspection. Can I do the same in my unfinished garage?

2) Thanks for the recommendation of using AC90 in the trench. All the AC90 I can find is rated for dry locations only, and TECK90 seems prohibitively expensive (the conduit will be cheaper). Does that sound right or am I looking in the wrong places? Edit: Doh. I did indeed not mention trench in my original post.
Last edited by PianoGuy on Apr 21st, 2017 1:16 am, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Addict
May 26, 2011
1792 posts
462 upvotes
Vancouver
markopas wrote:
Apr 20th, 2017 11:30 pm
From my understanding if I put pot lights in I should put them all on a new circuit on the breaker so that they are not tied in the existing lights and receptacles.
The code says a maximum of 12 outlets per circuit. However, 8-304(3) says "Where the connected load is known, the number of outlets shall be permitted to exceed 12". So putting them on their own circuit would DEFINITELY be ok, or if the existing circuit doesn't have much on it, it would probably be ok.
markopas wrote:
Apr 20th, 2017 11:30 pm
If I remember correctly, the existing light says 60w max and has two bulbs, does that mean I have a max of 120w to play with?
That means you can connect a maximum of two 60W bulbs to that specific fixture. It isn't related to how much the circuit is loaded.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Mar 3, 2011
620 posts
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PianoGuy wrote:
Apr 21st, 2017 1:22 am
That means you can connect a maximum of two 60W bulbs to that specific fixture. It isn't related to how much the circuit is loaded.
Would it make sense for me to turn off the breaker and calculate how much load is currently on it - I know for one it's definitely got a mix of lights and outlets tied to it and think it's a 15A breaker. I would hate to put an excess load on it causing it to trip just by plugging something in to the wall.

What is the code for wiring up pot lights to the breaker in an already constructed home? I know it's easier when things are pretty much exposed but how does that technically work, do they just leave the wire running along the drywall or are they fastened down to the joist on one end and then fastened down on the other end of the joint but pulled taunt along the beam and then leaving slack for the light?

From what I'm readying a 12ga wire is what is highly used this way it can be use on a 15a or 20a breaker.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
7233 posts
566 upvotes
Toronto
markopas wrote:
Apr 21st, 2017 10:30 am
Would it make sense for me to turn off the breaker and calculate how much load is currently on it - I know for one it's definitely got a mix of lights and outlets tied to it and think it's a 15A breaker. I would hate to put an excess load on it causing it to trip just by plugging something in to the wall.

What is the code for wiring up pot lights to the breaker in an already constructed home? I know it's easier when things are pretty much exposed but how does that technically work, do they just leave the wire running along the drywall or are they fastened down to the joist on one end and then fastened down on the other end of the joint but pulled taunt along the beam and then leaving slack for the light?

From what I'm readying a 12ga wire is what is highly used this way it can be use on a 15a or 20a breaker.
I'd love to help you, but reading your few posts above, I think you're out of your depth and should hire someone to do this work, PROPERLY and SAFELY.

- nothing in the code relates to calculating the actual load on the breaker for a mixed circuit.
- lighting can't be on a 20a circuit

........etc.......
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
7233 posts
566 upvotes
Toronto
PianoGuy wrote:
Apr 21st, 2017 1:16 am
Drew, thanks for replying to my earlier post. I have a few more questions for you (or anyone) if you have the time to answer.

1) When I did my unfinished basement, I ran NMD90 on the side of studs like this https://cdn2.tmbi.com/TFH/Step-By-Step/ ... GAR_04.jpg so that someone wouldn't be tempted to use them to hang stuff off or something. This passed inspection. Can I do the same in my unfinished garage?

2) Thanks for the recommendation of using AC90 in the trench. All the AC90 I can find is rated for dry locations only, and TECK90 seems prohibitively expensive (the conduit will be cheaper). Does that sound right or am I looking in the wrong places?
I don't like the way the wiring is run in that photo around the top plate. I'd drill it through the top plate and then run it along the ceiling joists/trusses.

Sorry I must have missed something about the trench. I think your original post just said garage. If it's a trench (i.e. a detached garage) then no AC90 is not fine. TECK90 is copper, which is $$$. You can do it in ACWU90 which is aluminum, sizing properly.

Refer to this document for lots of good information. www.airdrie.ca/getDocument.cfm?ID=952
Jr. Member
Oct 16, 2014
190 posts
13 upvotes
North York, ON
Drew_W wrote:
Apr 20th, 2017 9:20 pm
As an under vanity light? I dunno. How do you want to be able to turn it on? Usually those are put on high voltage occupancy sensors. Where are you plugging in the LED strip?
It's an LED strip that came with a 12v/5A power supply, with no switch (like a laptop power supply). I guess if I wire the switch on the 12V DC side, I will be in "ultra-low voltage" territory and not be covered by ESA code even if I do cowboy octopus wiring?

I have to cut (and put a switch in) either the DC side of the power supply, or the 2-prong AC wire, or leave the power supply wires alone and put a switch in the outlet where I plug the power supply to.

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