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[2018 UPDATE] Ask me anything about home electrical requirements, electrical code, wiring, devices

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  • Dec 14th, 2017 12:13 am
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Newbie
Oct 10, 2017
40 posts
19 upvotes
Barrie, Ontario
Drew_W wrote:
Nov 8th, 2017 4:42 pm
Technically, yes.
I currently have an electric range but the gas range I am looking to buy has a 120V plug. I know I can get a 240V to 120 fused adapter but the manufacturer of the new gas range requires a 120V - 20 amp outlet because the range has a warming drawer.
Will I pass inspection if I remove the stove plug and install a 20 amp receptacle in it's place? I can use one of these nifty covers https://www.garvinindustries.com/covers ... vers/72c38
I would cap off one wire of the existing stove wire and replace the breaker with a 20 amp single breaker.
I plan to do this myself and with a permit seeing as how I need to get one for my dishwasher breaker.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 23, 2004
1624 posts
191 upvotes
Montreal
RFDizzy wrote:
Nov 8th, 2017 10:00 pm
I currently have an electric range but the gas range I am looking to buy has a 120V plug. I know I can get a 240V to 120 fused adapter but the manufacturer of the new gas range requires a 120V - 20 amp outlet because the range has a warming drawer.
Will I pass inspection if I remove the stove plug and install a 20 amp receptacle in it's place? I can use one of these nifty covers https://www.garvinindustries.com/covers ... vers/72c38
I would cap off one wire of the existing stove wire and replace the breaker with a 20 amp single breaker.
I plan to do this myself and with a permit seeing as how I need to get one for my dishwasher breaker.
In theory this would work.
Although you will have to find a way to connect a 120V 20A outlet to that AWG8 gauge wire. A standard outlet will not accept that big of a wire...
Newbie
Oct 10, 2017
40 posts
19 upvotes
Barrie, Ontario
AMD wrote:
Nov 9th, 2017 9:06 am
In theory this would work.
Although you will have to find a way to connect a 120V 20A outlet to that AWG8 gauge wire. A standard outlet will not accept that big of a wire...
Of course I would pigtail with some number 12 wire and use large marrets. I want to know if doing this install will pass inspection however.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 27, 2014
3336 posts
716 upvotes
Mississauga
krs wrote:
Nov 7th, 2017 4:34 pm
According to this spec sheet:
https://www.kitchenaid.ca/en_CA/shop/-[ ... MBP100ESS/

that microwave requires a 20 amp/240 volt circuit.

So yes, the standard 15amp/120 volt circuit is not adequate.
I realized if I get a wall oven and microwave convection combo then I should be fine?
signature removed for rule violation. no referrals allowed.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 28, 2005
3105 posts
184 upvotes
Ontario / Quebec
ar2020 wrote:
Nov 9th, 2017 9:37 am
I realized if I get a wall oven and microwave convection combo then I should be fine?
Depends on the specific units and the power you have available.

Check the voltage and current (amperage) requirement of the units, not the wattage they deliver.

If you're not sure how to check that then post the manufacturer and model numberhere.

What power do you have available where you want to install the units?
And is each of those circuits dedicated? ie has its own breaker.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
7238 posts
567 upvotes
Toronto
RFDizzy wrote:
Nov 9th, 2017 9:11 am
Of course I would pigtail with some number 12 wire and use large marrets. I want to know if doing this install will pass inspection however.
It's odd, but it will pass.
Newbie
Oct 10, 2017
40 posts
19 upvotes
Barrie, Ontario
Drew_W wrote:
Nov 9th, 2017 8:52 pm
It's odd, but it will pass.
The only other option would be a costly one. I would have to run a new 20 amp circuit to the panel and open the basement finished ceiling. I just want to be sure that the stove outlet can be removed. if a home is roughed in with a gas stove line during new construction, is it required by code to install a 240V stove outlet or is it exempt?
Sr. Member
Dec 14, 2011
866 posts
244 upvotes
London
Well, I think I goofed, but I believe after reading I might be okay.
I am finishing a room and ran all my 14/2 wire to my boxes. When I did so, I cut the copper ground and screwed them into my box.
Now when I went to put in my receptacles, I noticed that the ones I bought have a separate green screw for the ground. Problem: my incoming and outgoing copper ground are too short. Damn.
I have a 14/2 wire coming from the panal (getting a contractor to hook up the breaker so I don't die) into the box, and then a 14/2 wire leaving the box and going to the next receptacle.

So on reading I think that I have a couple of options:
1. unscrew the ground wires I attached to the box and attach a pigtail that screws into the box and then the green screw on the receptacle.
2. remove the fibre 'washer' from the mounting screw of the receptacle so that the when attached the yolk of the receptacle contacts the metal box making everything grounded.
3. getting a piece of copper wire and run it from the green mounting screw of the receptacle to a different screw attached to the box.

I'm leaning towards #2 because it is easier, faster, and wont take up anymore room in the box. I think #3 would be pretty easy as well.
I plan on testing each outlet with something like this this tester: http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/gardn ... p.html#srp
Sorry this was so long. I just want to make sure it is all safe and correct.

I'm not sure if these options are allowed here. I'm going to go to the library (unless ya'll can help) and check out the code book or Knight's book. The rough in inspector didn't say anything about it, but I don't want a hassle on the final. He actually didn't seem to concerned since really all I was running was receptacles (no lighting, heated floor etc), so simple 14/2 going box to box on one circuit.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 23, 2004
1624 posts
191 upvotes
Montreal
Drakestar wrote:
Nov 23rd, 2017 9:01 am
Well, I think I goofed, but I believe after reading I might be okay.
I am finishing a room and ran all my 14/2 wire to my boxes. When I did so, I cut the copper ground and screwed them into my box.
Now when I went to put in my receptacles, I noticed that the ones I bought have a separate green screw for the ground. Problem: my incoming and outgoing copper ground are too short. Damn.
I have a 14/2 wire coming from the panal (getting a contractor to hook up the breaker so I don't die) into the box, and then a 14/2 wire leaving the box and going to the next receptacle.

So on reading I think that I have a couple of options:
1. unscrew the ground wires I attached to the box and attach a pigtail that screws into the box and then the green screw on the receptacle.
2. remove the fibre 'washer' from the mounting screw of the receptacle so that the when attached the yolk of the receptacle contacts the metal box making everything grounded.
3. getting a piece of copper wire and run it from the green mounting screw of the receptacle to a different screw attached to the box.

I'm leaning towards #2 because it is easier, faster, and wont take up anymore room in the box. I think #3 would be pretty easy as well.
I plan on testing each outlet with something like this this tester: http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/gardn ... p.html#srp
Sorry this was so long. I just want to make sure it is all safe and correct.

I'm not sure if these options are allowed here. I'm going to go to the library (unless ya'll can help) and check out the code book or Knight's book. The rough in inspector didn't say anything about it, but I don't want a hassle on the final. He actually didn't seem to concerned since really all I was running was receptacles (no lighting, heated floor etc), so simple 14/2 going box to box on one circuit.
This has been discussed before in this thread. You don't have anything to do.
When you screw your receptacles in the metal box you are effectively grounding the outlet.
(The screw touches the metal part of the outlet and then the screw touches the box.)
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 10, 2008
3528 posts
289 upvotes
St. John's
AMD wrote:
Nov 23rd, 2017 9:11 am
This has been discussed before in this thread. You don't have anything to do.
When you screw your receptacles in the metal box you are effectively grounding the outlet.
(The screw touches the metal part of the outlet and then the screw touches the box.)
Is it really code not to have your receptacle pigtailed to the incoming grounds? Doesn't seem right to me.
Let's hug it out
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Deal Addict
Sep 11, 2006
1029 posts
218 upvotes
Toronto
Drakestar wrote:
Nov 23rd, 2017 9:01 am
2. remove the fibre 'washer' from the mounting screw of the receptacle so that the when attached the yolk of the receptacle contacts the metal box making everything grounded.
AMD wrote:
Nov 23rd, 2017 9:11 am
This has been discussed before in this thread. You don't have anything to do.
When you screw your receptacles in the metal box you are effectively grounding the outlet.
(The screw touches the metal part of the outlet and then the screw touches the box.)
This is some hack garbage advice here. You ground the receptacle with a copper wire end of story. We are in Ontario Canada and not some third world country.
Deal Addict
Sep 11, 2006
1029 posts
218 upvotes
Toronto
RCGA wrote:
Nov 23rd, 2017 9:25 am
Is it really code not to have your receptacle pigtailed to the incoming grounds?
No
Sr. Member
Dec 14, 2011
866 posts
244 upvotes
London
DIrty-D wrote:
Nov 23rd, 2017 9:26 am
This is some hack garbage advice here. You ground the receptacle with a copper wire end of story. We are in Ontario Canada and not some third world country.
You sound hostile, but that is okay I don't mind. @AMD seems to think I don't need a separate copper wire which is in line with one of the options I outlined. Everything I read online agrees with these responses (differing opinions), I'll go to the library. I think they are friendly there. Thanks all the same:) Take an upvote for trying to help, I appreciate it.
Deal Addict
Sep 11, 2006
1029 posts
218 upvotes
Toronto
Drakestar wrote:
Nov 23rd, 2017 9:51 am
You sound hostile, but that is okay I don't mind. @AMD seems to think I don't need a separate copper wire which is in line with one of the options I outlined. Everything I read online agrees with these responses (differing opinions), I'll go to the library. I think they are friendly there. Thanks all the same:) Take an upvote for trying to help, I appreciate it.
My comment was meant for @AMD I should have clarified that. You need a ground wire at the receptacle screw for a solid ground connections. What happens to the ground connection when the plug becomes loose over time?
Sr. Member
Dec 14, 2011
866 posts
244 upvotes
London
DIrty-D wrote:
Nov 23rd, 2017 11:35 am
My comment was meant for @AMD I should have clarified that. You need a ground wire at the receptacle screw for a solid ground connections. What happens to the ground connection when the plug becomes loose over time?
No problem! I’m sorry to stir things up. I had a similar thought about it getting loose, since I have seen that happen before. I’d hate for someone to get a nasty shock.

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