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  • Nov 8th, 2006 3:26 am
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5 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 2, 2003
2846 posts
225 upvotes
Peterborough, ON
Dear Bob,

I just wanted to say thank you for being my reference. As a result, I start my new position next monday. I appreciate your time and would like to be able to call upon you again for any future opportunities.

Sincerely,


T-Man

Or


Dear Bob,

I just wanted to say thank you for being my reference. They decided to hire another candidate over me this time around due to lack of experience. Although I did not get the position this time I appreciate your time and would like to call upon you again for future opportunities.

Sincerely,


T-Man




However you put it, you are doing the right thing by at least thanking them. Good Luck! Whats the job?
Tung(Tom)Nguyen
Sr. Member
Nov 21, 2003
848 posts
2 upvotes
0
It's important to thank people for providing a reference, but it doesn't have to be formal. Just a quick note/email saying thanks and mentioning how the interview went, etc.
Deal Addict
Feb 24, 2004
1433 posts
73 upvotes
EH100501AC wrote:I did some Googling only to find a Thank You Letter saying thanking someone for referring them to you but I would like to see any samples, templates or guides on thanking someone for referring you to someone else.
Yeah, I agree it doesn't have to be formal. My references range from personal friends to VPs of major corporations I've met in my career. For personal friends, I'd give them a call and we'd go out for beer or lunch -- I'd treat, of course. For the VP-type, they're always too busy to go out so I'd buy them a small gift (a nice bottle of wine seems to work really well ~ $20) and write "A small token of my appreciation" on a gift card. You'll get the regular "Oh, you shouldn't have!" or "It was my pleasure!" reponse. I'd also send them an email about 3-6 months after I start the new job to say how much I like it and thank them again. Also, offer to have lunch if you're available. Mainly just to keep that relationship. Most importantly, be sincere.. So do only what you feel is adequate, and don't come off as bribing them. Most people agree to be your reference because they genuinely think you're a capable person.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Feb 23, 2004
2634 posts
106 upvotes
Calgary
fly wrote:
Jun 1st, 2006 1:40 pm
Yeah, I agree it doesn't have to be formal. My references range from personal friends to VPs of major corporations I've met in my career. For personal friends, I'd give them a call and we'd go out for beer or lunch -- I'd treat, of course. For the VP-type, they're always too busy to go out so I'd buy them a small gift (a nice bottle of wine seems to work really well ~ $20) and write "A small token of my appreciation" on a gift card. You'll get the regular "Oh, you shouldn't have!" or "It was my pleasure!" reponse. I'd also send them an email about 3-6 months after I start the new job to say how much I like it and thank them again. Also, offer to have lunch if you're available. Mainly just to keep that relationship. Most importantly, be sincere.. So do only what you feel is adequate, and don't come off as bribing them. Most people agree to be your reference because they genuinely think you're a capable person.
But how to find reference when people near you always "Eat their young?"
or tell you "come more to work, you make more money, don't go back to school" (dead end/entry position jobs)
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