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Access hole in laundry closet wall?

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  • Dec 31st, 2019 2:45 pm
[OP]
Member
Mar 15, 2007
492 posts
53 upvotes
Toronto

Access hole in laundry closet wall?

The second floor laundry closet in our townhouse has a hole cut in the wall towards the floor. There are some pictures showing the hole with the grille removed.

The wall the hole is in is shared with a bathroom, in the closeup picture you can see the white plastic of the tub. Is there any reason the builder would have made this hole in the wall? The laundry closet water lines are not accessible through it and neither is the plumbing for the tub.

In the near future we will be renovating this laundry closet and the bathroom beside it, which will include replacing the tub with a shower stall. If there are no building requirements to have this hole I’m just going to fill it in to get rid of the ugly grille.
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5 replies
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
13358 posts
13711 upvotes
Oakville
Well the dryer needs a source of air so it could just be air vent.
Deal Fanatic
Oct 26, 2008
6064 posts
1727 upvotes
BC
Agree it is intake air for dryer whether gas or electric.

Laundry closets must either have louvered doors, or a good gap at the bottom of a solid door.

Looks like you have a solid door from the strike plate in the picture and probably no air gap at the bottom as that can present the same issue as louvered doors - noise into living areas.
So alternative make up air required.
Definitely don't do away with it in future reno. Unless you want to undercut the door, or fit a louvered door.
Newbie
Sep 12, 2017
63 posts
36 upvotes
They likely cut the drywall to get access under the tub. Often they sprayfoam under the tub to stop it from creaking and try to support it. Not the best practice, but commonly happens. I'd guess they installed the tub first. Then needed access to foam it in place and just cut through from the laundry room side.
[OP]
Member
Mar 15, 2007
492 posts
53 upvotes
Toronto
macnut wrote: Agree it is intake air for dryer whether gas or electric.

Laundry closets must either have louvered doors, or a good gap at the bottom of a solid door.

Looks like you have a solid door from the strike plate in the picture and probably no air gap at the bottom as that can present the same issue as louvered doors - noise into living areas.
So alternative make up air required.
Definitely don't do away with it in future reno. Unless you want to undercut the door, or fit a louvered door.
The door to the laundry closet is solid and there is about a half inch of gap between the door and the floor.
CanadianHandyman wrote: They likely cut the drywall to get access under the tub. Often they sprayfoam under the tub to stop it from creaking and try to support it. Not the best practice, but commonly happens. I'd guess they installed the tub first. Then needed access to foam it in place and just cut through from the laundry room side.
There is definitely spray foam under the tub so this makes sense.

There does not appear to be any ducting in the wall cavity above the hole in the wall, however I can't see all the way to the top so I can't be sure if something comes in from the side. The ceiling in the bathroom beside the laundry closet is lower than all the other ceilings on the second floor so I assume there is something running through there.

There is an air vent mounted high on a wall on the third floor which shoots straight down to a point somewhere above the second floor bathroom. Could it be possible that the laundry closet is pulling in air from this vent on the third floor? Seems like that would be a lot of work compared to maybe putting a vent on the bottom of the laundry room door.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 15, 2007
4814 posts
2018 upvotes
nonlinear wrote: The door to the laundry closet is solid and there is about a half inch of gap between the door and the floor.



There is definitely spray foam under the tub so this makes sense.

There does not appear to be any ducting in the wall cavity above the hole in the wall, however I can't see all the way to the top so I can't be sure if something comes in from the side. The ceiling in the bathroom beside the laundry closet is lower than all the other ceilings on the second floor so I assume there is something running through there.

There is an air vent mounted high on a wall on the third floor which shoots straight down to a point somewhere above the second floor bathroom. Could it be possible that the laundry closet is pulling in air from this vent on the third floor? Seems like that would be a lot of work compared to maybe putting a vent on the bottom of the laundry room door.
Looks like it was just opened to spray foam the tub and instead of patching they used a grill. There’s no other reason
Everything has been said before, but since nobody listens we have to keep going back and beginning all over again. - Andre Gide

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