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For all of the landlords on here, the good ones are few and far between.

  • Last Updated:
  • May 21st, 2017 12:07 pm
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Aug 14, 2007
7777 posts
493 upvotes
Toronto

For all of the landlords on here, the good ones are few and far between.

Finally glad I have a good landlord that knows what they're doing.

My last landlord was always on and off about wanting the basement back for him and his family so said I need to get a place by May, so I had one by April 1st.

Now I've come to find that in the end, he couldn't afford it and got new renters and I know I can cause problems for him if I go to the board, there is a section on that site specifically for this happening.

Maybe I'll just let it go and not bother, but that place is a dump, full of mould, exhaust in the bathroom doesn't (and never did) work, no CO detector, defective smoke detectors... the list goes on.


New place? Tenants above me are quiet, don't care how loud I am really, landlord actually has people come and do the lawn care and all of that, apartment is nice, no complaints etc.


It took a damn long time (6+ months) to find this place. 90% of the places I saw were definitely illegal apartments, with 80% of them being like 2-3 separate apartments in a basement... beyond ridiculous.

For you landlords on here that actually do what your supposed to do, how hard is it? My plan when I buy a home is to rent the basement out so I'm constantly reading up on legal issues and such. Have you guys ever had a tenant from hell? What did you do?
22 replies
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Mar 23, 2008
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I had a great landlord in my last place. He was a private owner (bought the condo for his kids to go to university, then rented it out after they were done). He treated me as a responsible adult, and I treated the place as if it was my own condo. Like fixing the flame sensor in the furnace that quit on a long weekend and would have cost him $200+ for an emergency send-out, replacing the faucet that was leaking, etc. All with his approval, of course. On his part, he left me alone, wasn't stopping by every week or even every month. Only saw him when it was time to sign the new lease. He sent me a card every Christmas with a gift card for $100 to a nice restaurant.

Basically, we treated each other with respect. I was there for 5 years, and was sad to leave for a number of reasons.

C
Deal Addict
Jan 25, 2007
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Paris
Too may people trying to do it as cheaply as possible (like the "why do I need a permit" crowd on here) and too many idiots to rent to.

My Dad was a landlord for a long time and he said "The problem with renting a house is that you are renting to someone who doesn't have the credit to buy a house for the same cost as the mortgage payment. Those people don't make good tenants"

I also recall talking to a CPA once who said "Never own real estate you dont live in"

A buddy of mine was looking to become a landlord in Guelph recently and his buddy who's a real estate agent told him there are no income positive properties in the city right now, so buy only if you expect the market to keep climbing.
Gbill2004: Thanks but I'll just smell the couch before/if I buy it.

jonnyb: I go in there like PICASSO and toss the glue everywhere, I don't care what house I'm on.
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Mar 23, 2008
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Edmonton
Jerico wrote:
May 19th, 2017 3:25 pm
Too may people trying to do it as cheaply as possible (like the "why do I need a permit" crowd on here) and too many idiots to rent to.

My Dad was a landlord for a long time and he said "The problem with renting a house is that you are renting to someone who doesn't have the credit to buy a house for the same cost as the mortgage payment. Those people don't make good tenants"

I also recall talking to a CPA once who said "Never own real estate you dont live in"

A buddy of mine was looking to become a landlord in Guelph recently and his buddy who's a real estate agent told him there are no income positive properties in the city right now, so buy only if you expect the market to keep climbing.
Any property can be income positive if you put enough cash down on it...

C
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Aug 14, 2007
7777 posts
493 upvotes
Toronto
CNeufeld wrote:
May 19th, 2017 3:16 pm
I had a great landlord in my last place. He was a private owner (bought the condo for his kids to go to university, then rented it out after they were done). He treated me as a responsible adult, and I treated the place as if it was my own condo. Like fixing the flame sensor in the furnace that quit on a long weekend and would have cost him $200+ for an emergency send-out, replacing the faucet that was leaking, etc. All with his approval, of course. On his part, he left me alone, wasn't stopping by every week or even every month. Only saw him when it was time to sign the new lease. He sent me a card every Christmas with a gift card for $100 to a nice restaurant.

Basically, we treated each other with respect. I was there for 5 years, and was sad to leave for a number of reasons.

C
Nice. I treat this place like it's my own. Haven't seen the landlord since, there was very minor things that cost so little to either fix or make better that I just did it, and can easily be reversed if needed (ie, something basic like a door stopper so I don't put a hole in the wall by accident).
Deal Addict
Nov 30, 2003
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If he never gave you an N12 form and never followed thru with filing eviction papers - as the N12 form cannot legally evict you on it's own.. then you causing him problems is not possible

If he did go thru the full process to legally evict you, then you have a case

Being a landlord is mainly hard when you have issues with the tenants, just know the law and if you don't then make sure you read up on each time you have to deal with a situation, screening for tenants also takes time and can be a bit tough

Last year had a tenant who started bouncing cheques, had to go thru the whole eviction process that took about 4 months until they were finally out.. wasted the money on a sheriff as they left days before he showed, and of course you can't get that money refunded even though he takes 3+ weeks to come and for some fun reason they only tell you (the landlord) the day before they will be showing - but send a registered letter to the tenant days/weeks ahead notifying them when he will be coming, not sure how that is fair to the landlord as who knows what the tenant is doing in between that time and you have to be very flexible to be able to be there to meet the sheriff and change the locks

It was a stressful situation, lucky for us we stuck by our guns and didn't believe their lies and followed thru, and we were able to handle the lack of income and pay the mortgages

When you have a good tenant then it's 'easy'.. hopefully you can just collect rent checks and routinely check in to make sure everything is ok, respond timely when there are issues that need attention
Sr. Member
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Dec 27, 2007
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Oshawa
You could easily swap landlords from your thread title and insert tenants.
We once had a family that ended being drug dealers. Ahh memories.
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May 10, 2005
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Ottawa
jonnyb wrote:
May 19th, 2017 4:16 pm
You could easily swap landlords from your thread title and insert tenants.
We once had a family that ended being drug dealers. Ahh memories.
Oh so true.
Bottom line, you get what you pay for. Cheap rent does not get you Prince William as a landlord or a Buckingham Palace apartment.
"We investigate in secret so that we don't smear innocent people." James Comey
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Dec 23, 2015
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Newmarket, ON
XtremeModder wrote:
May 19th, 2017 2:22 pm
My plan when I buy a home is to rent the basement out
Why would you work so hard to buy a home, and then give up the main advantage of homeownership (no close proximity to other people) by letting some strangers live in it? The income is just not worth the headaches.

I used to be a tenant, my parents used to be landlords, and now I am a homeowner, so I've seen all sides and take it from me, being a tenant and being a landlord BOTH suck.

If you want to invest in real estate, look into REITs, it's much less hassle than being direclty involved, not to mention more liquid and more tax friendly.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Aug 14, 2007
7777 posts
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Toronto
Pete_Coach wrote:
May 19th, 2017 6:24 pm
Oh so true.
Bottom line, you get what you pay for. Cheap rent does not get you Prince William as a landlord or a Buckingham Palace apartment.
Funny enough, these apartments I mentioned that were like 3 units in one basement, the crazy landlords were asking 900, I had no idea that more than half the places I saw were like this to begin with either. One was even 1100, the second I saw a second unit in the basement I just walked away, didn't even consider it. The place I have no is a nice walk out and reasonable on rent. Couldn't be any happier to be honest
Sr. Member
Oct 20, 2011
901 posts
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Mississauga
BeapChastard wrote:
May 19th, 2017 6:47 pm
Why would you work so hard to buy a home, and then give up the main advantage of homeownership (no close proximity to other people) by letting some strangers live in it? The income is just not worth the headaches.
Some people overextend themselves and can only afford the house if they rent out part of the home to help pay for the mortgage. They purchase the home, get as many friends and relatives to help renovate a section of the home, usually the basement, forgo permits, or building it to code etc to save money and in the end, when they run into maintenance or repair issues they don't have any savings to do so. They rent out cheaper than the competition so it's easy to rent.

It's like Pete Couch stated, you get what you paid for, in other words, if the rent is cheap than it's usually an illegal apartment not build to code. Also don't expect to get what needs to be repaired quickly or at all.
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Mar 31, 2008
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We have a tenant in the basement. Single girl, who takes the bus. From a small town, has a slight disability. She initially lived here with her bf as a student. But they broke up and she's stayed. She has 2 cats which we never put into the contract is allowed.(she moved in when it was only my wife that owned the house). We haven't raised rent at all the whole time. So it's been nearly 10 years. It's an about 1350 sf basement, walkout. Has 2 + 1 bedrooms. I could probably get 75% more rent today, but she's been a good tenant, doesn't need driveway space, and we would feel bad trying to 'kick' her out. Even then, it would be for a real legitimate reason, and I would do whatever to help her find another place.

When I was changing home insurance and told them about the tenant, and rent they pay and how we've never raised it, nor think about raising it, the agent was like "wow, you guys are too nice". For us, it's not about trying to maximize $$. It's about a peaceful existence. Finding any sort of decent, respectful person is good enough for us. We don't need to get more $$. The reward is in that there's something there, and it's about long-term peace. We look at it more like it helps pay for the taxes and utilities. Our tenant is also low maintenance so that's key for us. If she were to move out, we probably wouldn't look to rent it out. Just that she had never left, and likely won't for awhile.

It's also because we make decent $$ for now, house was bought when it was much cheaper. Alot of those slum lords are like that because they're desperate for $$ and probably don't have much other salaried like source of income, hence the gouging, cheapo, preying mentality. Also, we both have parents who taught us it's not all about money. I bet many landlords didn't have that type of upbringing.
Last edited by at1212b on May 20th, 2017 12:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Feb 8, 2014
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Being a landlord in Ontario means your often selling your soul to your tenant, the government and often even the easter bunny.
The laws are designed to assume all landlords are terrible and billion dollar corporations and that all tenants are saints.
As a landlord you can get into trouble in a million ways from not picking a tenant for a reasonable reason (such as they can't afford your place, if the rent is $1000/month and they make $1001 you can't legally deny them, though they could never eat and the rent is what they will forego) to what you can allow or not allow (smoking is a contentious one) to taking 3 months minimum to get rid of a tenant with often little hope of recovering the lost rent.
In addition professional tenants can work the system to go for 1-2 years without paying rent.

That said the above is not common but a very bad tenant can ruin your investment and sanity and you need to be ready for anything.
If you get lucky you will have no problems, but i know of no one who doesn't have bad tenant stories from mess to damage (no deposits btw) to sob stories to non payment to you name it.

So you can pull it off but you need to do a lot of research into what your getting into and without experience i would not recommend it. I often end up telling people they are running a business so don't fall for the sob stories (which is rather common unfortunately). As mentioned above REITs are a viable, low headache and lower risk option.
Lies, damned lies, statistics and alternative facts
Deal Addict
Jan 25, 2007
1793 posts
418 upvotes
Paris
CNeufeld wrote:
May 19th, 2017 3:28 pm
Any property can be income positive if you put enough cash down on it...

C
Except that opportunity cost plays a part.
Gbill2004: Thanks but I'll just smell the couch before/if I buy it.

jonnyb: I go in there like PICASSO and toss the glue everywhere, I don't care what house I'm on.
Deal Addict
Jan 25, 2007
1793 posts
418 upvotes
Paris
at1212b wrote:
May 20th, 2017 12:17 am
She has 2 cats which we never put into the contract is allowed.
Right there you lost me. You can say no pets. They can sign a no pets clause. You can shout it from the roof.

But they can get a pet and there is little to nothing you can do about it. You don't need to put that she is allowed to have pets in any contract, she is just allowed. Might as well put that she can't breathe your air in the apartment, she needs to bring her own.
Gbill2004: Thanks but I'll just smell the couch before/if I buy it.

jonnyb: I go in there like PICASSO and toss the glue everywhere, I don't care what house I'm on.
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