Food & Drink

The AMAZING freeze dried pizza challenge!!! preppers... survival... science...

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 20th, 2017 8:02 pm

Poll: Would you eat freeze dried food? Also... Would you keep a stash of emergency freeze dried food?

  • Total votes: 16. You have voted on this poll.
Yes I would eat freeze dried food
 
6
38%
NO, I will not eat it...
 
1
6%
Maybe, I will eat it.
 
2
13%
Yes I would keep a stash of emergency freeze dried food.
 
5
31%
No, I wouldn't keep a stash.
 
1
6%
Maybe, I will keep a stash...
 
1
6%
[OP]
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The AMAZING freeze dried pizza challenge!!! preppers... survival... science...



This is a guy who just freeze dries random food and has a taste review with a bunch of colleagues.
Here... He freeze dried cheese and pizza.
The cheese turns out good.. and I actually had it before in the form of "moon cheese" sold @ starbucks and sobeys.
Some of them don't like it... But it is what it is. Freeze dried food preserves it for a good 20 years if you chamber vacuum seal it. So you can't expect it to taste gourmet. I'd be happy if it just resembled what the food is.


Would you eat freeze dried food?
Would you keep a stash of freeze dried food for emergency purposes? It last 15-20 years easily if stored properly.
Vote on my poll! Multiple answers allowed.


Theres a HArvest right @ home freeze dryer that's $2300 USD on the market...
9 replies
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Nov 15, 2008
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Naw, water is the most important nutrient to me, so I am always trying to eat moister foods like vegetables, fruit, etc.

Though...I think the cheese might end up like this stuff v and yeah I would eat that.

Image

So yes/no. Depends on if the food has a lot of fat in it I guess (e.g., potato chips have no moisture so they are freeze-dried-like)
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lecale wrote:
Mar 19th, 2017 6:33 pm
Naw, water is the most important nutrient to me, so I am always trying to eat moister foods like vegetables, fruit, etc.

Though...I think the cheese might end up like this stuff v and yeah I would eat that.

Image

So yes/no. Depends on if the food has a lot of fat in it I guess (e.g., potato chips have no moisture so they are freeze-dried-like)
His videos are pretty interesting
He made spaghetti & it turned out really well after it was rehydrated. That one seems like the best camp/survival food... high energy & you can throw in ground beef for protien
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UrbanPoet wrote:
Mar 19th, 2017 8:34 pm
His videos are pretty interesting
He made spaghetti & it turned out really well after it was rehydrated. That one seems like the best camp/survival food... high energy & you can throw in ground beef for protien
So these people are...outdoorspeople? Preppers? Really twisted foodies?

I think you could probably overbake a Ristorante and get a similar cracker result (lol my roommate is awesome at it) so yeah, honestly, I would and have eaten that.

Babybel isn't real cheese (process) so I don't think they were using the right kind of cheese for this experiment. If you cook pasta and dehydrate I suppose it is like the pasta version of Minute Rice. I can see that working well.
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lecale wrote:
Mar 19th, 2017 9:16 pm
So these people are...outdoorspeople? Preppers? Really twisted foodies?

I think you could probably overbake a Ristorante and get a similar cracker result (lol my roommate is awesome at it) so yeah, honestly, I would and have eaten that.

Babybel isn't real cheese (process) so I don't think they were using the right kind of cheese for this experiment. If you cook pasta and dehydrate I suppose it is like the pasta version of Minute Rice. I can see that working well.
Freeze drying is quite different. Not the same as dehydration which uses heat. The freeze drying process freezes food at a very low temperature. Then a vacuum chamber removes the moisture. The result is dried food that retains all the nutritional value and color of the original food. Typically the food should be re-hydrated before eating. This brings it back to a more palatable texture.

It has many uses ... e.g. Military, camping, survival kits etc...

This guy sells freeze dried food for camping and survival/prepping purposes.
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UrbanPoet wrote:
Mar 19th, 2017 11:27 pm
Freeze drying is quite different. Not the same as dehydration which uses heat. The freeze drying process freezes food at a very low temperature. Then a vacuum chamber removes the moisture. The result is dried food that retains all the nutritional value and color of the original food. Typically the food should be re-hydrated before eating. This brings it back to a more palatable texture.

It has many uses ... e.g. Military, camping, survival kits etc...

This guy sells freeze dried food for camping and survival/prepping purposes.
Yeah, you should see the pizza when buddy's done with it. A little bit caramelized. I think the Ristorante worked out so well for Prepper Guy because it is a cracker-type crust to begin with.

I didn't realize you could do this with spaghetti but I guess ramen noodles are dehydrated by frying...so the dehydrated spaghetti is just like ramen without all the grease.

(Last night I had to make spaghetti for the neighbour because his wife was out and he put a pack in cold water and then brought it to the boil and was confused that he created a large bonded rectangle of noodles...anyway it was 30 minutes to boil enough water and cook the stuff and get him out the door, so dehydrated spaghetti is topically interesting. He could have been gone in 3 minutes.)

Does this prepper guy have an all-meat video? Sort of intrigued at the palatable rehydrated chicken and the success with ground beef you mentioned.

EDIT: my relatives in alberta do a ground beef jerky like this one (oven dehydration) http://allrecipes.com/recipe/234518/ground-beef-jerky/ You need to start with tube beef because it is a really fine grind, or process it finer yourself.
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Mar 20, 2003
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Well, there's not much new about this, you can buy more and more freeze dried foods, even Costco has a large section on their website. Check out Thrive , they have fruits, veggies, meats, grains, dairy, bakery, etc... a few years ago they only had fruit and veggies.

Hard to know how they taste, a lot of reviews say they are great and taste just like fresh but I suspect they are given free products to review positively- but then again, when your freeze dried strawberries are the last you'll ever eat, maybe that makes them taste better,
KitKat item collector- always looking for swag or branded items.
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lecale wrote:
Mar 20th, 2017 1:10 am

Yeah, you should see the pizza when buddy's done with it. A little bit caramelized. I think the Ristorante worked out so well for Prepper Guy because it is a cracker-type crust to begin with.

I didn't realize you could do this with spaghetti but I guess ramen noodles are dehydrated by frying...so the dehydrated spaghetti is just like ramen without all the grease.

(Last night I had to make spaghetti for the neighbour because his wife was out and he put a pack in cold water and then brought it to the boil and was confused that he created a large bonded rectangle of noodles...anyway it was 30 minutes to boil enough water and cook the stuff and get him out the door, so dehydrated spaghetti is topically interesting. He could have been gone in 3 minutes.)

Does this prepper guy have an all-meat video? Sort of intrigued at the palatable rehydrated chicken and the success with ground beef you mentioned.

EDIT: my relatives in alberta do a ground beef jerky like this one (oven dehydration) http://allrecipes.com/recipe/234518/ground-beef-jerky/ You need to start with tube beef because it is a really fine grind, or process it finer yourself.
Feneant wrote:
Mar 20th, 2017 11:40 am
Well, there's not much new about this, you can buy more and more freeze dried foods, even Costco has a large section on their website. Check out Thrive , they have fruits, veggies, meats, grains, dairy, bakery, etc... a few years ago they only had fruit and veggies.

Hard to know how they taste, a lot of reviews say they are great and taste just like fresh but I suspect they are given free products to review positively- but then again, when your freeze dried strawberries are the last you'll ever eat, maybe that makes them taste better,
They actually are great and taste just like fresh. When fully rehydrated , they are very close to the original product.
These videos... Don't do it much justice. I found it fun to watch to see the freeze dried food... But they didn't use very good preparation in rehydrating. All of that food would have tasted way better if rehydrated long enough and evenly. I notice they do a half ass job of it... and mostly taste test the food in its freeze dried form... Which will obviously be very dry, crunchy and lacking in flavor.

In his channel he also does steak and pork chops. The meat turn out really well! Taste and looks exactly like the original form. Its kinda cool and scary. The only thing is... That lady BBQ everything well done...



theres one around there with chicken breast too...
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UrbanPoet wrote:
Mar 20th, 2017 2:46 pm
In his channel he also does steak and pork chops. The meat turn out really well! Taste and looks exactly like the original form. Its kinda cool and scary. The only thing is... That lady BBQ everything well done...
Hmm I would do the steak by marinading it first, then dehydrating it. To season I would baste the steak with base https://www.walmart.ca/en/ip/better-tha ... 0188766890 instead of salt and then add dry spice. I think the base would help recover some of the beef flavour, and it would fix the not enough salt issue too.

The meat should be about 3/4 water so that 12 oz steak would go down to 3 oz. To rehydrate, instead of dunking it in an unmeasured quantity of water, I would precisely marinade the steak in a ziplock with the missing 9 oz (~255 ml, or 1 cup + 1 tbsp) water. If the steak is able to fully rehydrate it would suck up all the water and spice AND you don't have to lug a bottle of A1 into the woods. I would like to see THAT as an experiment - how much water can the meat recover to begin with? They also had a grey colour on their grilled steaks because of steam because they were too wet still.

When you fully cook pretty much any kind of meat your weight goes 1/6, so if the meat doesn't recover all of its water it's sort of cooked to begin with. Plus, those steaks were fast-fry thin. I think you just want a minute a side to heat and eat. I wouldn't actually give them any serious grill time.

I wonder what they would be like if you grilled them rare and then dehydrated them? A judicious amount of boiling water in a ziploc might make them ready-to-eat. Plus, you'd have enough grill time to actually get some smoke into them.

Have you tried any of these experiments at home yet?
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lecale wrote:
Mar 20th, 2017 7:55 pm
Hmm I would do the steak by marinading it first, then dehydrating it. To season I would baste the steak with base https://www.walmart.ca/en/ip/better-tha ... 0188766890 instead of salt and then add dry spice. I think the base would help recover some of the beef flavour, and it would fix the not enough salt issue too.

The meat should be about 3/4 water so that 12 oz steak would go down to 3 oz. To rehydrate, instead of dunking it in an unmeasured quantity of water, I would precisely marinade the steak in a ziplock with the missing 9 oz (~255 ml, or 1 cup + 1 tbsp) water. If the steak is able to fully rehydrate it would suck up all the water and spice AND you don't have to lug a bottle of A1 into the woods. I would like to see THAT as an experiment - how much water can the meat recover to begin with? They also had a grey colour on their grilled steaks because of steam because they were too wet still.

When you fully cook pretty much any kind of meat your weight goes 1/6, so if the meat doesn't recover all of its water it's sort of cooked to begin with. Plus, those steaks were fast-fry thin. I think you just want a minute a side to heat and eat. I wouldn't actually give them any serious grill time.

I wonder what they would be like if you grilled them rare and then dehydrated them? A judicious amount of boiling water in a ziploc might make them ready-to-eat. Plus, you'd have enough grill time to actually get some smoke into them.

Have you tried any of these experiments at home yet?
The HArvest Right home freeze dryer is $2300USD for the smallest size... lol...
I can't afford it.
However I've eaten plenty of "Mountain House" Freeze dried camp food. I also have a stash in my emergency kit. Beef stragonoff is my favourite...

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