Expired Hot Deals

[Amazon Canada] All-new Kindle Paperwhite $109.99 (21% off)

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 3rd, 2019 2:37 am
Banned
Oct 5, 2015
951 posts
664 upvotes
Outremont, QC
my old Kobo is still working fine, very tempting for the new Kindle and it's waterproof
Jr. Member
Jan 28, 2017
128 posts
60 upvotes
For those complaining of the long wait to borrow ebooks at the library: if it's a specific book you want, yeah. The library screen will give you suggestions, however, on similar books currently available to borrow. Of course the newer (or the more popular) the book is, the lower the chance it will be available to borrow tout de suite, you would have to put a hold on it. I found that if you cast your net wide, it might work. For example, let's say I look for books by David Baldacci and John Sandford. Some of those (say 5) I might be able to borrow right away, and other 30-40 books go on hold. By the time I am done with the first 5, some of those holds are coming in.
Deal Fanatic
May 9, 2007
5926 posts
1004 upvotes
Vancouver Island, BC
alpovs wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 11:52 am
No, I didn't. Something is wrong with your reading comprehension. Good reason not to have a library card.
Or a good reason to get a library card. Winking Face
Earthlings, you're evicted.
You are not getting the damage deposit back.

God
Jr. Member
Dec 9, 2014
123 posts
55 upvotes
GTA
alpovs wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 4:33 pm
Depends on whom you ask. I was choosing between this Kindle and Kobo Clara HD. If you read reviews for Clara HD the general opinion is that it's better.
Agreed. While the Kindle has slightly better build quality, the Kobo's are more customizable. Kobo has always been one step ahead when it comes to features on their eReaders (compared to Amazon). They got the front light first, they had customizable fonts first, waterproofing, comfort light, etc. The front lighting of the Kobo's is also much more even I've found. My 2nd gen Paperwhite had dark spots at the bottom of the eReader. Exchanged twice and they all had uneven lighting while my Clara HD's lighting has been pretty uniform and this seems to be the consensus for mobileread members too.
Deal Addict
Jun 1, 2008
1472 posts
272 upvotes
Toronto
alpovs wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 11:31 am
As I thought they recommend to rinse it with fresh water after exposure to saltwater.
Notice that it has only been certified for immersion up to two meters in fresh water. For saltwater they mention what to do if it is splashed on. In the review I read, which I can’t find so who knows, they were quite emphatic about the saltwater. Anyway, nice to know it can be splashed on by saltwater!
Deal Addict
Jun 1, 2008
1472 posts
272 upvotes
Toronto
alpovs wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 11:27 am
Speaking of this and the Kindle... The consensus is the books from Overdrive can be converted to MOBI format for reading on Kindle. In the process DRM has to be removed, which removes the 20 day expiration of the book...

What do you think of the adjustable backlight color on Kobo? This is the biggest selling point for me. Based on what I read other ebook readers including the extinct ones got this feature many years ago. It seems to me the Kindle is technologically behind.
I really like the way the Kobo is backlit. It’s easier on the eyes than my Kindle. I really have no complaints with it.

My other musings regarding e-readers are only opinions. Sony used to have consumer e-readers. They left. Phones are now much larger and reading library books on them is easy. I prefer the screen technology you have on the Kobo and Kindle, but for the occasional library book a tablet would do and I suspect someone with a large phone would be quite comfortable doing that.

It’s pretty hard for public libraries to keep supporting Overdrive, which is owned by the same company that owns Kobo ( not entirely sure about that as things have been changing so fast), which is not making a Kindle version in Canada in order to push Kobo sales. Something has to give. Of course if Overdrive is no longer affiliated with a Kobo then that reason is void. They do support, though not as nicely as with the Kobo, Kindle in the US.

Thanks for the Mobi issue trick, but that does seem to be a non-trivial process. You have to first get rid of the copy protection and the convert it from ePub to Mobi and all this on a computer? Probably not strictly legal, but who knows...

Thinks are changing fast in the digital world. I still think the Kindle will, unfortunately, be the only consumer e-reader left in a few years. Hope I am wrong. I would have thought the ePub format for Kobo would have been a bigger asset. It isn’t obvious how to read books bought on iTunes or Google Play with it, and they both use ePub. That, to me, would be really great as I have libraries of books on both.

Anyway, the $110 price for the Kindle is excellent. That’s what I paid for my Kobo from Staples a month or so ago.
Deal Addict
Jun 1, 2008
1472 posts
272 upvotes
Toronto
JHW wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 12:10 pm
As an aside, the attacks on the library system ("who has a library card anymore these days") gave me a good chuckle. It's reminiscent of the attacks on the library from a particular former Toronto city councillor (now in higher office) circa 2011.
The future of libraries, librarians, etc... is not at all clear. They are in a similar position as newspapers have been for quite a while. Once books go totally digital the library will be totally changed. Librarians now get very different training than in the past. While it’s great to have someone who can recommend great books, is a scholar, etc... it is less clear that people need them to teach you how manage search engines. That is, they are not really the first person one thinks of for computer advice. The scholarship issue is still there but there is no shortage of well educated people who can recommend great reads. I just don’t see where they will fit in. “Library Science” is really an odd description of the field.

I guess we will all see if paper books continue... I wouldn’t bet on it.
Deal Addict
Jun 1, 2008
1472 posts
272 upvotes
Toronto
BobSagget wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 3:58 pm
lol there are so many different genres of books, you really need to mention what types of genres you are into.
www.goodreads.com is a very good site for finding new books and I highly recommend it. Since Amazon bought Goodreads, it's also integrated into Kindles as well.

Once you sign up and start reading and rating books, it will give you recommendations on books it feels you will like.
Does Goodreads allow you to manage books in a cross border way? Amazon makes it very difficult to manage books from different countries. I currently use two Kindles for that which is not ideal.
Deal Addict
Jun 1, 2008
1472 posts
272 upvotes
Toronto
JHW wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 12:04 pm
I can't see Canadian libraries moving to support Kindle unless Kindle's Canadian market share increases substantially enough to justify the added expense of licensing additional formats from the publishers. The existing conflict over exclusivity deals on e-Audiobooks with Audible (also owned by Amazon) doesn't help either.
Why should our tax dollars be going to support one foreign company over another? The libraries are in an untenable position using Overdrive to push Kobo sales. Is there no other copy protection that is hardware neutral?
Deal Addict
Nov 24, 2004
3722 posts
431 upvotes
Toronto
pmcd wrote:
Feb 12th, 2019 1:41 am

The future of libraries, librarians, etc... is not at all clear. They are in a similar position as newspapers have been for quite a while. Once books go totally digital the library will be totally changed.
...
I guess we will all see if paper books continue... I wouldn’t bet on it.
I agree that the role of the libraries will change. There will be more emphasis on electronic resources and less on physical resources. I can see library branches becoming more like "community hubs" or working spaces that happen to also have books.

I also agree that the role of the librarian will change dramatically.

I disagree with your analogy between libraries and newspapers. Newspapers are suffering because of competition with on-line news sources offering the same "service" (news) for free. Libraries already offer their product for "free" -- what competition do you see that is capable of killing libraries off?

The e-book format only really "works" for pure text-based works with limited graphical content. When it comes to reference works, textbooks involving diagrams, anything with lots of illustrations, etc., paper books still have a lot of advantages. E-books win on convenience for linear reading only, it's not as if the quality of the writing is any better (i.e. it's not like DVD vs. VHS). Plus the fact that there is an existing "extremely long tail" of printed works out there. The idea that paper books will somehow "go away" seems preposterous to me.
pmcd wrote:
Feb 12th, 2019 1:51 am
Why should our tax dollars be going to support one foreign company over another? The libraries are in an untenable position using Overdrive to push Kobo sales. Is there no other copy protection that is hardware neutral?
Chicken and egg. Kobo seems to have overwhelming market dominance in Canada already. I don't have data, but anecdotally, I don't know anyone IRL who uses a Kindle, and I know about a dozen people who use Kobos. If the libraries have to choose one format over another (which they seem to have to because of insane licensing costs) then they'll choose the one that most of their patrons can make use of.
Deal Addict
Jul 3, 2017
3683 posts
2545 upvotes
Kobo got a historical head start in Canada over Kindle, which it has maintained to the present day. That's because Amazon was late getting around to Canada (as usual), and Chapters-Indigo and Kobo jumped in to offer a much cheaper e-reader. It took years for Kindle to catch up on price.

I've always bought Kobo, but I've tried all the others, including Kindle. Meh, nothing much to choose between them other than price. They all buy their screens from eInk and add generic hardware around it. Sure, newer generations have improvements, but it's a generational thing rather than a brand thing - and lately newer generations are getting worse as they concentrate on improving profit margin rather than capability. Reading is pretty much the same on all of them - you don't want to notice features when you're reading - you just want to read the book and have the e-reader fade into the background. The minor quirks of book management are not enough to distinguish one over another, although I can see that someone locked into the Amazon system with a lot of Kindle books might want to stick with it for convenience. I think the average comparison review I've seen generally favours Kindle over Kobo, but mainly for ecosystem reasons like ease of buying books from Amazon, and convenience of emailing books to your Kindle etc.. Ebook formats are easily converted with tools like Calibre, even with DRM.

As for the libraries, I'm sure the reason they chose epub format and Adobe DRM was that it was an industry standard independent of ebook sellers or vendors of ebook readers. They couldn't choose Amazon's Kindle format because it was proprietary to one ebook vendor, and there weren't any other popular choices. Overdrive may be associated with Rakuten, but that doesn't mean that they are promoting Kobo - just epub format. Our library actually offers its own ebook loan platform and Overdrive as alternatives, and it does offer books in mobi format where available (Kindle-compatible without Amazon DRM).

It's a struggle for libraries these days for sure. They're still trying to figure out how to work with ebooks. The limited number of digital copies and ease of borrowing without visiting the library in person means that popular ebooks are always unavailable with long waiting periods. The book publishers are demanding that libraries be forced to re-buy digital books after a certain number of loans to simulate the way that print books wear out and need replacing - otherwise, they say that it will break their book pricing model. And like my local library, they are being pulled in too many different directions - on the rare occasions I visit the library in person these days, it's hard to find any actual books. They have multi-media centres and classrooms and lounges and kids play areas, CDs and DVDs, and computer terminals. The research section is a pathetic shadow of what it used to be. What books they have are dominated by things like a huge percentage of foreign-language books because of changing demographics (Chinese in my area), and rows of easy-to-buy series like "Chicken Soup for every f'in thing you can imagine". It's a sad experience to compare to the book browsing of the past.
Sr. Member
Sep 16, 2013
594 posts
278 upvotes
SW ON
pmcd wrote:
Feb 12th, 2019 12:59 am
Notice that it has only been certified for immersion up to two meters in fresh water. For saltwater they mention what to do if it is splashed on. In the review I read, which I can’t find so who knows, they were quite emphatic about the saltwater. Anyway, nice to know it can be splashed on by saltwater!
The instructions in the link provided state: "If your Kindle is immersed in salt water, chlorinated water, soapy water, or liquids other than fresh water, make sure you rinse that liquid out of the device with fresh water such as cold tap water."
Sr. Member
Sep 16, 2013
594 posts
278 upvotes
SW ON
Exp315 wrote:
Feb 12th, 2019 9:57 am
As for the libraries, I'm sure the reason they chose epub format and Adobe DRM was that it was an industry standard independent of ebook sellers or vendors of ebook readers. They couldn't choose Amazon's Kindle format because it was proprietary to one ebook vendor, and there weren't any other popular choices. Overdrive may be associated with Rakuten, but that doesn't mean that they are promoting Kobo - just epub format.
This! "EPUB is a technical standard published by the International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF). It became an official standard of the IDPF in September 2007, superseding the older Open eBook standard. The Book Industry Study Group endorses EPUB 3 as the format of choice for packaging content and has stated that the global book publishing industry should rally around a single standard."

EPUB is standard. Amazon chose not to support it.
Deal Fanatic
May 9, 2007
5926 posts
1004 upvotes
Vancouver Island, BC
pmcd wrote:
Feb 12th, 2019 1:41 am
“Library Science” is really an odd description of the field.

I guess we will all see if paper books continue... I wouldn’t bet on it.
Yes, and academic preparation has changed. It used to be an MLS (Master in Library Science). It is now an MLIS (Master of Library and Information Science).
Earthlings, you're evicted.
You are not getting the damage deposit back.

God
Deal Addict
Jun 1, 2008
1472 posts
272 upvotes
Toronto
@Exp315

Is Adobe’s DRM used by Apple, which uses ePub? I just don’t understand the link. I can understand using ePub but the real issue is which copy protection is to be used.

I am not blaming Overdrive. I don’t see why I should be supporting Overdrive which is owned by the same company that owns Kobo. Overdrive supports the Kindle in the US. Why don’t they in Canada? In any case libraries should not be picking hardware. It’s not an ePub issue, otherwise they would support iPads, Google Books, etc... You cannot read a library book on an Apple device without using Overdrive.

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