Expired Hot Deals

[Amazon Canada] Radon Detector - Corentium Home by Airthings - $179.99

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 5th, 2019 7:47 pm
[OP]
Member
Apr 13, 2015
261 posts
225 upvotes
Alberta
I ran for 7 days in one room in my basement, and it was under <100. Now I put it into my furnace room, just to see what it would say, and after 12 hours it is showing 156 Crying Face
Deal Expert
User avatar
Dec 26, 2005
16552 posts
1559 upvotes
Thornhill
teqtoke wrote:
Oct 16th, 2019 4:16 pm
I ran for 7 days in one room in my basement, and it was under <100. Now I put it into my furnace room, just to see what it would say, and after 12 hours it is showing 156 Crying Face
I think the recommendation is not to put it in the utility room, due to drafts etc. Then again, it shouldn't have a higher reading if there are drafts. May be weather-related?

bjl
What we do in life echoes in Eternity... and in Google cache.
RFD discounts for Schluter products
[OP]
Member
Apr 13, 2015
261 posts
225 upvotes
Alberta
t3359 wrote:
Oct 16th, 2019 4:18 pm
I think the recommendation is not to put it in the utility room, due to drafts etc. Then again, it shouldn't have a higher reading if there are drafts. May be weather-related?
The weather is nice today here.
I was just curious what the difference would be between one end of basement and the other where the furnace is.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Nov 28, 2016
13556 posts
1532 upvotes
Out west
robfun wrote:
Oct 16th, 2019 4:13 pm
I thought I'd share my radon notes. I know it's a lot to read, but still thought some might find it useful.

Some info on radon:
- https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/ ... radon.html
- https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/ ... -2013.html

Canada recommends levels be below 200; I believe US and UK recommend levels be below 100.

*** Some stats ***
Thanks to @RETD: best-buy-airthings-wave-wireless-radon- ... #p30192179
Radon Level Lifetime Probability of Getting Lung Cancer
Smoker* Base Level 12%
Smoker 200 Bq/m3 17%
Smoker 800 Bq/m3 30%
Non-Smoker Base Level 1%
Non-Smoker 200 Bq/m3 2%
Non-Smoker 800 Bq/m3 5%

*** Fluctuations: ***
Radon fluctuates through the year and weeks. In Ottawa, our house is around 130 in a dry summer, 175 in a wet summer and about 230 in winter with our HRV running.

*** Here are some things that can make radon increase: ***
- Colder weather, especially winter. Radon can't escape as easily through the soil.
- Rain. Radon can't escape as easily through water logged soil.
- Anything that vents outside (e.g. range hood fan, dryer, portable A/C). This will draw air of the house, which needs to be replaced. air/radon from the soil under your house may be pulled in.
- HRV / air exchanger issues (see section below)

*** Guides: ***
Health Canada: Reducing Radon Levels in Existing Homes: A Canadian Guide for Professional Contractors
https://carst.ca/resources/Documents/Re ... tors-E.pdf

*** Radon detectors ***
There are several - just read @tpirovol notes: best-buy-airthings-wave-wireless-radon- ... #p30102242
Another: Corentium Home by Airthings amazon-ca-radon-detector-corentium-home ... 9-2319071/

*** Mitigation: Sub-slab depressurization ***
The big one is sub-slab depressurization. Create a hole in your basement slab and vent outside from there.
Cost: ~$2500-3500 + tax done by a company. DIY $400-800 (~2 days).
There are some actions (below) that are required before this action (e.g. sump pit sealing, crack/hole sealing).
Below are some other easier starting points.
Lots of details in forums. Here's an example: best-buy-airthings-wave-wireless-radon- ... #p30192332

*** DIY migitation: HRV Air Exchanger ***
- Ensure your HRV is running. We stopped ours for week and radon went from 200 to 500. In Ottawa, we have a fan speed of 4 throughout the year. In summer, it's set to 40 mins re-circulate / 20 mins fresh air. In winter, it's 100% fresh air. These settings aren't the best for our HVAC systems in the dead of summer or winter. We're still experimenting with what's best.
- Ensure the HRV outside inlet cover/screen is clear of debris. When we bought our home it was fully plugged.
- Clean the filters on your HRV monthly. Check the filters on your furnace regularly too.
- Ensure your HRV is properly balanced. Radon Works recommended 15% positive.
- Optional: RadoStat (controls HRV based on radon level) - http://radoncorp.com/mitigation/radostat.php . Anyone used this?
- Note: An HRV that is unbalanced can have negative or positive pressure.
-- positive pressure draws less air in from outside and keeps more of the same air circulating in the home. This can cause radon gas to build up and not be vented.
-- negative pressure pushes more air out of the house than it is drawing in. Then air/radon gets pulled in from cracks to replace the vented air.

*** DIY migitation: Crack, holes, vents ***
- Seal cracks in cement basement floors and walls (where exposed). Our radon mitigator recommended this: https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.self ... 84903.html
- Optional: Some window wells have drains that connect to the weeping tile around your house. Make sure these stay clear in winter to allow radon to vent out. (We added PVC pipe about 4 feet up).
-- Note: We considered adding a fan to this PVC piping to draw air out, but Radon Works said fans are prone to freezing in our climate in the winter.

*** DIY Mitigation: Sump pits (required) ***
- An unsealed sump pit is a common source of radon in the home. The mitigators I spoke to wouldn't evaluate our home until the sump was sealed.
- Weeping tile enters the pit, and if not submersed under water, this allows air/gases from under your house to easily enter the home.
- An air tight seal for your sump pit is typically required before radon mitigators will do anything. I did something like this:

- Adding a ventilation fan to a sump seal is not recommended if there are open drains / weeping tiles that enter the pit. You'll essentially be drawing a large volume of air from outside. If you do choose to go this route, a high airflow fan was recommended like the RN3 https://www.radondetect.ca/fantech-rn3- ... n-fan.html
- Dranjer makes drains that can be used in sealing a sump pit, so that if there is a water leak, the water can still make it to your pit and be pumped out by the sump pump: http://www.radondetect.ca/dranjer-floor-drains/

*** DIY migitation: Seal where the slab meets the wall. ***
Newer homes, built to code, should have a proper seal where the slab meets the wall, but many do not. If the vapor barrier was done perfectly, then the radon may seep up the walls and outside. Otherwise, accessing & sealing where the slab meets wall will help stop radon from entering the home. However, this is time consuming & challenging and may not solve the problem if small cracks are missed). Sub-slab depressurization would be better if one can afford it.
The sealing is often challenging since the following can be in the way: stud, vapor barrier, baseboards, drywall.
What some people do, is:
-- remove the baseboards
-- cut off a 3" strip of drywall (at bottom)
-- cut through vapor barrier
-- use 2 part 2 lb spray foam (must be mixed). Not the one-time use stuff in spray can. ~$400
-- put spray foam where slab meets wall.
-- replace baseboards with 5" high baseboard to cover removed drywall.

*** Radon fans: ***
The two most recommended radon fans are:
- RadonAway RP145 Radon Mitigation Fan, 4-Inch / Great reviews on amazon.ca / Price: $220
-- https://www.amazon.ca/RadonAway-23030-1 ... 00294RBFM/
-- https://www.radonaway.com/rp145-pro.php
- FanTech Rn2 Radon migitation fan 166 cfm 4.5" duct
-- https://www.amazon.ca/Fantech-Rn2-Radon ... B07F6ZYG3B
-- https://www.radondetect.ca/fantech-rn2- ... n-fan.html
-- Replacement for the well reviewed Fantech HP 2190 Radon Fan, 4.5" Duct, 163 CFM
-- For fantech, there are installation kits: http://www.radondetect.ca/installation-kits/
Great info, and probably the most on this entire forum. This post should be stickied or something

While I will be watching mine and keeping an eye on readings, expecially when the colder winter months hit and the furnace runs more, Im taking this off my "worry" list. It will be kept downstairs in the rec room mostly where I will look at it occasionaly, and maybe once in awhile moved to a lower bedroom if I see rec room amounts spike.

I will be mentioning radon to my friends howver, and loan this out to them if they want to check levels.

While the puck thing is cheaper, I like having this now, moved when I want, readings fairly fast, and I have it for years.
Member
Dec 9, 2003
300 posts
114 upvotes
Had mine going for 36 hours now and i'm at an avg of 22 which looks to be great. I was going through all the instructions and what process do you guys follow when going to different rooms? Do you check each space for a few days or a week then reset and move it to the next to do it all over again? If you do the reset will it need to re-calibrate again because that took 24hrs all on its own!
Deal Expert
User avatar
Dec 26, 2005
16552 posts
1559 upvotes
Thornhill
janko023 wrote:
Oct 17th, 2019 9:46 am
Had mine going for 36 hours now and i'm at an avg of 22 which looks to be great. I was going through all the instructions and what process do you guys follow when going to different rooms? Do you check each space for a few days or a week then reset and move it to the next to do it all over again? If you do the reset will it need to re-calibrate again because that took 24hrs all on its own!
When I move the detector, I reset it and let it calibrate all over again. I was doing 7 days per room, but I think others have been doing less.

bjl
What we do in life echoes in Eternity... and in Google cache.
RFD discounts for Schluter products
Member
Jun 29, 2017
278 posts
822 upvotes
For those who did a DIY solution and those who had a contractor do the install, I have a few questions.
@CalgaryBen @MikeB84225 @Drizzt @muffin_man @instanoodles @bya1998 @d_Ave

  • How did you pick the location for the suction point in the slab? Did you do any test points? Did you pick the area with the highest radon levels? Corners vs side-walls? This guide has code limitations on page 46/54.
  • how did you get through the slab? I saw someone mentioned a powerful rented hammerDrill. Did it come with bits? How does this process work? I'm a newb about this. Anyone recommend a good video?
  • Does the fan come with a cord that you can plug right into an outlet? Is there any special electrical work required?

Thanks!
Member
Dec 3, 2010
481 posts
369 upvotes
Toronto
robfun wrote:
Oct 18th, 2019 12:28 pm
For those who did a DIY solution and those who had a contractor do the install, I have a few questions.
@CalgaryBen @MikeB84225 @Drizzt @muffin_man @instanoodles @bya1998 @d_Ave

  • How did you pick the location for the suction point in the slab? Did you do any test points? Did you pick the area with the highest radon levels? Corners vs side-walls? This guide has code limitations on page 46/54.
    I just picked the most convenient corner. Then again I had thick gravel aggregate under slab which would make location less critical.
  • how did you get through the slab? I saw someone mentioned a powerful rented hammerDrill. Did it come with bits? How does this process work? I'm a newb about this. Anyone recommend a good video?
    I had my own rotary hammer (NOT hammer drill). You just need a small diameter SDS drill. Draw the circle for the pipe on the floor and drill holes all around it. Then with a small sledgehammer, chisel and patience you'll get a hole. Don't worry if it's Not perfect, you just need to fit the pipe and you can then seal with polyurethane caulking later.
  • Does the fan come with a cord that you can plug right into an outlet? Is there any special electrical work required?
    Came with cable, you just need an electrical outlet.

Thanks!
Member
Dec 3, 2010
481 posts
369 upvotes
Toronto
For those only testing lower levels, my basement measured under 100, both in summer and winter. But second floor bedroom measured just over 200. It all depends on your HVAC system / indoor airflow.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Oct 25, 2018
535 posts
568 upvotes
robfun wrote:
Oct 18th, 2019 12:28 pm
For those who did a DIY solution and those who had a contractor do the install, I have a few questions.
@CalgaryBen @MikeB84225 @Drizzt @muffin_man @instanoodles @bya1998 @d_Ave


How did you pick the location for the suction point in the slab? Did you do any test points? Did you pick the area with the highest radon levels? Corners vs side-walls? This guide has code limitations on page 46/54.
I too picked the most convenient corner in my house (laundry room) so it is tucked away as you can hear it running but you have to be in the laundry room.


how did you get through the slab? I saw someone mentioned a powerful rented hammerDrill. Did it come with bits? How does this process work? I'm a newb about this. Anyone recommend a good video?
We had a hand drill to start to make a circlein the cement, we then tried to drill holes through the circle, which didn't work well. I bought a hammer drill and killed it, exchanged it the same day since it has a lifetime warranty, lol.
So I changed gears and rented a Jack Hammer drill/demolition drill from the local rental shop, and picked a few bits (you only pay for bits you use) It took like 30 mins and I spent $40 on it! I have ZERO experience using one and it was just me but It was freaking fun!! I only used the chisel tip, it was like a hot knife through butter!

It also helped since once I got through and under my house I could break up the large rocks to pull through as they would not have fit in my 5" hole for removal.



Does the fan come with a cord that you can plug right into an outlet? Is there any special electrical work required?
My RadonAway RP145 fan came with bare wires, I bought this from Amazon and then I just used wire connectors to attach, then you just plug the fan in



Thanks!
Deal Addict
Jan 13, 2003
2052 posts
407 upvotes
Guys, you are supposed to let the tester run for THREE MONTHS
Deal Guru
User avatar
Nov 28, 2016
13556 posts
1532 upvotes
Out west
Loomy wrote:
Oct 18th, 2019 1:36 pm
Guys, you are supposed to let the tester run for THREE MONTHS
Im going to, I got a base idea out of the box. Mine will be permanantly setup, and will look at it randomly. When winter really hits hard, that will be a true reading

If it does increase to an insane amount, then I will worry about it. Until then, it will just do its job
Deal Expert
User avatar
Dec 26, 2005
16552 posts
1559 upvotes
Thornhill
robfun wrote:
Oct 18th, 2019 12:28 pm
For those who did a DIY solution and those who had a contractor do the install, I have a few questions.
@CalgaryBen @MikeB84225 @Drizzt @muffin_man @instanoodles @bya1998 @d_Ave

  • How did you pick the location for the suction point in the slab? Did you do any test points? Did you pick the area with the highest radon levels? Corners vs side-walls? This guide has code limitations on page 46/54.
  • how did you get through the slab? I saw someone mentioned a powerful rented hammerDrill. Did it come with bits? How does this process work? I'm a newb about this. Anyone recommend a good video?
  • Does the fan come with a cord that you can plug right into an outlet? Is there any special electrical work required?

Thanks!
See this doc. Someone had suggested this when I was asking the same thing and it covered whatever I needed to know.

https://carst.ca/resources/Documents/Re ... tors-E.pdf

bjl
What we do in life echoes in Eternity... and in Google cache.
RFD discounts for Schluter products
Newbie
Jul 21, 2011
74 posts
28 upvotes
Toronto
Just curious, how does the radon get into the device? I taped the radon level sticker that came with the box onto the front, that shouldn't impact readings/accuracy right?

Top