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[Anova Culinary] Anova Sous Vide Precision Cooker - Back on Sale: $139 (60 off) for BT, $169 (90 off) for wifi - Free Shipping

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 10th, 2017 6:47 am
Newbie
Jan 2, 2015
82 posts
24 upvotes
Sarc wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 9:32 am
Did you sear the chicken after?
That's a good question, it's been almost a year so I'll try again ;)
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May 30, 2011
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secretliar wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 9:34 am
That's a good question, it's been almost a year so I'll try again ;)
Yes, you NEED to sear the meat after cooking. Cast iron pan, hot BBQ, etc. Otherwise the outside appearance is a bit 'slimy'. Still tastes fine, just not that appetizing to look at.

Chicken via sous vide is definitely better than standard oven or BBQ alone. Check out Serious Eats Guide to Chicken to see what effect different times and temperatures have - maybe you were at the wrong temp for your preferred texture (my favourite is 145F for 90 minutes, then finish on hot BBQ with sauce).
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Oct 1, 2008
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chadw01 wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 9:31 am
Thanks OP.

Never knew about Sous Vide cooking before, but now I'm curious and have questions.

1. What are the health implications of boiling food in plastic bags and possibly having chemicals leaching into the food?
3. Won't the bag melt if it's clipped to the pot while boiling?
I listen to a podcast called "Cooking Issues" with a food scientist/chef named Dave Arnold who likes to talk about sous vide (among many other topics). His answers to the above questions are: First, when doing sous vide cooking you should not be anywhere near "boiling" temperatures, you're probably aiming for 65-75 degrees C, and at those temperatures, name-brand Zip Loc bags are certified to be safe.

So don't set your circulator too hot and don't use dollar store bags, and you should be fine.

A quick Google search produces a ton of results that basically reiterate these points, so while that's not definitive proof that it's safe, I'm comfortable with that answer.

Here's a good guide to sous vide that also has a few words to say on the subject.

https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/a- ... -packaging
[OP]
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Aug 16, 2010
3935 posts
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chadw01 wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 9:31 am
Thanks OP.

Never knew about Sous Vide cooking before, but now I'm curious and have questions.

1. What are the health implications of boiling food in plastic bags and possibly having chemicals leaching into the food?
2. Is it possible to get all the air out of the bag using the displacement method vs a commercial sealer, and if not, isn't there a concern of bacterial growth during cooking?
3. Won't the bag melt if it's clipped to the pot while boiling?

For anyone that can answer, much appreciated.
1. As said, you would never come close to boiling temperatures. Killing bacteria is a function of time vs temp and not an absolute single target temperature. The recommended 165 for chicken kills bacteria instantly. A lower temperature like 150 kills the same bacteria in about 3 min. The whole point of sous vide is to cook at exactly the temperature you want your finished food to be and not one degree more. You would also use "Food Grade" bags, and generally, the higher MIL rating (thickness) the better.

2. You can get most of the air out with the displacement method. For most cooks, that's fine. For long cooks like beef brisket or pork shoulder (say, over 12 hours) I would use a vacuum sealer.

3. Not a problem since you're not boiling.
flyer12 wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 9:48 am
Yes, you NEED to sear the meat after cooking. Cast iron pan, hot BBQ, etc. Otherwise the outside appearance is a bit 'slimy'. Still tastes fine, just not that appetizing to look at.

Chicken via sous vide is definitely better than standard oven or BBQ alone. Check out Serious Eats Guide to Chicken to see what effect different times and temperatures have - maybe you were at the wrong temp for your preferred texture (my favourite is 145F for 90 minutes, then finish on hot BBQ with sauce).
Yes, that Serious Eats chicken reference guide is excellent and I often refer to it. Here's a handy printable quick reference time/temperature guide I also use from Chef Steps:
https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/so ... ture-guide
Member
Jul 11, 2007
209 posts
16 upvotes
GTA
thanks OP, i am serious consider this because this will make busy schedule much easier to handle, and likely easier to get kids eat! our current method of steak is in 30-40 min in oven at 130F with temperature probe, and quick sear at the end., this method, the stake is flavorful, very tender, and more forgiving to time irregularity/mistake, it does lack a bit of ruggedness of charcoal/grilling taste (we use to charcoal grill but charcoal grilling. our oven does not have wifi, and i am considering to get an wireless thermometer, for anyone with experiences, will sous-vide will make the stake/chicken taste even better then oven method?

another advantages i can think of sous-vide; is the it does not produce fume, smoke or smell during process, so we don't need to keep the rangehood on all the time during cooking period.

as for these concern about chemicals in bags leach out, would having a layer of aluminum foil warp or seal the food inside the zip bags helps?


thanks
Jr. Member
Jul 22, 2007
184 posts
20 upvotes
gogozy wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 11:43 am
while searching for more information about this cooking method, i found the Bay has one from Hamilton Beach on sales for $149.. (not sure if this is a good deal or not)
HAMILTON BEACH Slow Cooker with Sous-Vide Cooking Option
that same model is $129 on amazon.ca and walmart

reading the limited reviews, its a good slowcooker with low/mediocre sous vide abilities.



the main reason i purchased the anova wifi model: good reviews, and they key item was remote control through wifi.
bluetooth would be pretty useless for me due to range/architecture of my house, and the ability to be able to control it remotely is a defining factor for the purchase.

if i dont like it, i can return it in 60 days.
[OP]
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Aug 16, 2010
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gogozy wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 11:43 am
while searching for more information about this cooking method, i found the Bay has one from Hamilton Beach on sales for $149.. (not sure if this is a good deal or not)
HAMILTON BEACH Slow Cooker with Sous-Vide Cooking Option
While I can't say that I've used the Hamilton Beach SV cooker I'd say, in general, Hamilton Beach is not known for high quality. The Anova is a premium machine and very well regarded with a large user base and very well supported in the online community. 149 for the Hamilton Beach vs 139-169 for the Anova - hands down, I'd go with the Anova.
Newbie
Aug 30, 2015
58 posts
20 upvotes
Victoria, BC
Be warned: If there's a downside to sous vide it's that restaurant steaks will no longer taste as good as what you can make at home.
Member
Jul 11, 2007
209 posts
16 upvotes
GTA
sergers wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 12:35 pm
that same model is $129 on amazon.ca and walmart

reading the limited reviews, its a good slowcooker with low/mediocre sous vide abilities.



the main reason i purchased the anova wifi model: good reviews, and they key item was remote control through wifi.
bluetooth would be pretty useless for me due to range/architecture of my house, and the ability to be able to control it remotely is a defining factor for the purchase.

if i dont like it, i can return it in 60 days.
thanks, i think Walmart drop the price too!! a review on Hamilton unit says the bath isn't deep enough and no circulation device, plus it has no wireless connectivity. i am considering Anova because i already has an instant pot which make my crockpot useless.... and Anova is flexible to work on different size of pot, small, or big, and easy to store, Hamilton beach will definitely take away a high chunk of space. One question, i went through the Anova pages and read a lots there, i read about how user able to set some parameter on device, but i didnt find more detail and picture only temperature setting and didn't see the timer on the device, anyone know if i can use the Anova to set the time and temperature or, if there are other more parameters?

thanks
Jr. Member
Jul 22, 2007
184 posts
20 upvotes
setlist wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 12:37 pm
Be warned: If there's a downside to sous vide it's that restaurant steaks will no longer taste as good as what you can make at home.
i already have that problem without the sous vide lol, my problem is finding quality cuts consistently when only buying 2 steaks.
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Mar 10, 2004
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setlist wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 12:37 pm
Be warned: If there's a downside to sous vide it's that restaurant steaks will no longer taste as good as what you can make at home.
Also if you are a cheapskate like me - known lower cost/crappy cuts of meat (round steaks, blade steaks, shoulder steaks etc) come out fork tender.

I have a Coleman type plastic picnic cooler. We cut a hole in one corner = the diameter of the Anova. It keeps the water warm reducing the need for the Anova heating element to boost the temperature of the water.
Last edited by plymouthhater on Oct 31st, 2017 12:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Member
Jul 11, 2007
209 posts
16 upvotes
GTA
setlist wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 12:37 pm
Be warned: If there's a downside to sous vide it's that restaurant steaks will no longer taste as good as what you can make at home.
i totally agree, we don't have sous vide device, but after owning a kamado grill I can confirm that, we no longer go to (stake) restaurant for the taste, it's usually because we run out of time to cook at home, or, enjoy services. buy some good stake and enjoy family time. i think this will be an excellent device to cook scallops.
i have yet to try the sous vide, but.... just thinking of cooking without heat and sound of sizzling kind of make me a bit upset....
[OP]
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Aug 16, 2010
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plymouthhater wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 12:48 pm
Also if you are a cheapskate like me - known lower cost/crappy cuts of meat (round steaks, blade steaks, shoulder steaks etc) come out fork tender.
+1. I know a lot of people like using premium cuts like beef tenderloin and rib steak / prime rib for this method of cooking but I find the cheapo cuts you listed benefit most from sous vide.
Jr. Member
Sep 18, 2012
137 posts
88 upvotes
Quebec City
What temperature you cooked the chicken at?

Was it chicken breasts or whole chicken?
secretliar wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 8:59 am
We almost never eat beef, we will try.
We tried with chicken and prefered the oven results as the texture came out weird with anova :S

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