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[Anova Culinary] Anova Sous Vide Precision Cooker - BLACK FRIDAY Sale $129 (70 off) for BT, $159 (100 off) for wifi - Free Shipping

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 7th, 2017 11:20 am
Member
Jul 11, 2007
215 posts
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anyone know if there is a timer setting on the device? thanks
Jr. Member
Mar 4, 2008
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gogozy wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 1:21 pm
anyone know if there is a timer setting on the device? thanks
Time is set in the app - so you'll see it countdown on the device once it is set
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Aug 22, 2005
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patiently waiting for a black friday sale...
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Jul 22, 2007
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_Jason_ wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 1:44 pm
patiently waiting for a black friday sale...
they have 60 day guarantee, can buy and return if found cheaper.
i bought it on my visa which provides price protection aswell.

so i just made the purchase since its a reasonable good price now, and can take advantage of the lower pricing if/when available within the next cpl months.

thing about black friday deals... the best are limited, and i am not down for endless page loading/timeouts during black friday at a chance to maybe get it cheaper.
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Oct 1, 2008
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gogozy wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 12:50 pm
i have yet to try the sous vide, but.... just thinking of cooking without heat and sound of sizzling kind of make me a bit upset....
You still have to sear at the end.
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Aug 22, 2005
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sergers wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 2:00 pm
they have 60 day guarantee, can buy and return if found cheaper.
i bought it on my visa which provides price protection aswell.

so i just made the purchase since its a reasonable good price now, and can take advantage of the lower pricing if/when available within the next cpl months.

thing about black friday deals... the best are limited, and i am not down for endless page loading/timeouts during black friday at a chance to maybe get it cheaper.
Thanks for the info. Do you know if they will price match BF deals (limited time offers)?
[OP]
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Aug 16, 2010
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Oh, just a comment about performance. If I had a complaint, it would be that the Anova takes too long to bring the water up to the set temperature. For most cooks of normal size, this is not a problem - I do most of the cooking in a stock pot. But for large ones like a pork shoulder and a couple of racks of ribs, it takes a long time to heat up - for these kinds of cooks, I'll use a Coleman cooler and mix in a bunch of kettles of boiling water to speed up the preheating.
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DiceMan wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 8:30 pm
Oh, just a comment about performance. If I had a complaint, it would be that the Anova takes too long to bring the water up to the set temperature. For most cooks of normal size, this is not a problem - I do most of the cooking in a stock pot. But for large ones like a pork shoulder and a couple of racks of ribs, it takes a long time to heat up - for these kinds of cooks, I'll use a Coleman cooler and mix in a bunch of kettles of boiling water to speed up the preheating.
I just use the hot water from the tap (130F) and it doesn't take the Anova very long to get it the rest of the way. I also use a couple of Coleman coolers (large and small FrankenCooler) to help maintain the temp and eliminate evaporation (which it does very well - often water is still warm after a few days in the cooler between cooks so I will just microwave a few quarts of that water to bring it up to temp again).
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Jul 11, 2007
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flyer12 wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 8:40 pm
I just use the hot water from the tap (130F) and it doesn't take the Anova very long to get it the rest of the way. I also use a couple of Coleman coolers (large and small FrankenCooler) to help maintain the temp and eliminate evaporation (which it does very well - often water is still warm after a few days in the cooler between cooks so I will just microwave a few quarts of that water to bring it up to temp again).
thanks for input, read some review saying 800W or 900W isnt sufficient, is this the reason using coolers as container because cooler are insulated and have less heat loss? btw, with the WIFI unit, i can put the meat in the container before i leave for work in the morning (say...8am), and set the start cooking time few hours later(says... 2pm), and expect meat to be ready after period of set time (.. 6pm), ? i notice a lot of device only has timer to stop, but have to start cooking manually, thanks!
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gogozy wrote:
Nov 1st, 2017 12:28 pm
thanks for input, read some review saying 800W or 900W isnt sufficient, is this the reason using coolers as container because cooler are insulated and have less heat loss? btw, with the WIFI unit, i can put the meat in the container before i leave for work in the morning (say...8am), and set the start cooking time few hours later(says... 2pm), and expect meat to be ready after period of set time (.. 6pm), ? i notice a lot of device only has timer to stop, but have to start cooking manually, thanks!
I would think that the 800W of the Anova would be sufficient - just would take time to heat cold water up, which I have never bothered to do. I just like the cooler idea as it keeps everything tidy and closed from the kids and pets. It also keeps the stove top and counter cleared for other prep (cooler is on the floor in the corner of the pantry out of the way) - I can just see the mess if I tried that with an open stock pot!!

I can't answer the Wi-Fi question as I have the BT model (and have never used that feature). I just turn it on manually when I want to start cooking.
But from what I read earlier, the issue with putting the food in the waterbath hours before you want to start to cook (i.e. before laving for work in the morning) is that it now sits in that dangerous temperature zone (40F - 130F) for hours before the cooking starts. That isn't a good idea at all.. I read about suggestions of an ice bath so it stays cold (less than 40F) until the cooker turns on, but that always seemed like more risk that it was worth.
There are lots of items that can cook relatively quickly (an hour) so I have been doing those on weeknights - my kids can turn on the Anova as soon as they are home from school so it is at the correct temperature when I get home and the meat has already been vacuum sealed (either frozen or fridge) so I just have to pop it in and start the prep on the side dishes.
Fish is a great quick option (20 minutes (30 frozen)). Chicken and pork tenderloin are only an hour. More 'advanced meats' are kept for the weekend as I usually have more time to prep those.
The biggest benefit I find with this (besides the great taste and texture of the food) is the ability to extend the cooking time for hours with no ill effect. A few weekends ago we were having company over but it was a nice day so we were went for a walk in the countryside when they arrived. I had a 3 hours buffer of when the chicken and steak would be done (started the chicken earlier in the day at the higher temp and just kept it in the waterbath when I added the steak at the lowered temp). I was able to add the steak before we left for the walk and it was ready (but not overdone) when we returned home after the 90 minute walk.
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Nov 27, 2003
711 posts
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aerohead888 wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 8:50 am
It is a lot of prep work to cook sous vide, but it produces such great food. Our favourite is prime rib steaks. It always cooks to exactly the temperature that you want. It is a chore to vacuum seal them ahead of time and the hours it can take to cook, but the results are well worth it. I had 6 buddies over for steaks back in the spring. They are still talking about how amazing the steaks came out.

We just started to do Eggs Benedict with the sous vide. It takes a long time to cook compared to traditional poaching, but this takes the guesswork out of the it. No worry about under or over cooking the eggs.

You gotta give it a try. Even if you don't have a sealer, just use water displacement with zip lock bags. That is what I did for the first few months.
A lot of prep work?
1) buy steak
2) season steak with salt and pepper
3) put steak in ziplock bag (add a little butter and aromatics to be fancy)
4) after doing the air removal trick, leave bag/steak in pre-heated water for 1-2hours*
5) remove from bag
6) pat dry
7) sear for 30 seconds a side on a burning hot, cast iron pan
8) serve

*depends on cut and thickness

I'd say prep work is pretty minimal, if you don't count the time it takes to actually bathe.

This thing turns kitchen rookies into master steak chefs overnight. :)

You will have the protein nailed every time, which leaves you time to step up your sides game.
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Aug 27, 2008
587 posts
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Ottawa
deeznuts wrote:
Nov 1st, 2017 2:56 pm
A lot of prep work?
1) buy steak
2) season steak with salt and pepper
3) put steak in ziplock bag (add a little butter and aromatics to be fancy)
4) after doing the air removal trick, leave bag/steak in pre-heated water for 1-2hours*
5) remove from bag
6) pat dry
7) sear for 30 seconds a side on a burning hot, cast iron pan
8) serve

*depends on cut and thickness

I'd say prep work is pretty minimal, if you don't count the time it takes to actually bathe.

This thing turns kitchen rookies into master steak chefs overnight. :)

You will have the protein nailed every time, which leaves you time to step up your sides game.
Compared to grabbing a steak from the fridge and going directly to step 7... yes, it's a lot of prep work.

That being said, I can't go back to non-sous vide steaks. I'll now buy the steaks the day before, marinade, vacuum seal them and have them rest in the fridge overnight before cooking.

More work, but well worth it.
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Nov 27, 2003
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aerohead888 wrote:
Nov 1st, 2017 3:07 pm
Compared to grabbing a steak from the fridge and going directly to step 7... yes, it's a lot of prep work.

That being said, I can't go back to non-sous vide steaks. I'll now buy the steaks the day before, marinade, vacuum seal them and have them rest in the fridge overnight before cooking.

More work, but well worth it.
Fair enough, but even doing the steak from the fridge, in a pan, takes time, if done properly. For example, according to Jamie Oliver (arbitrarily taking his opinion, because I like the bit he did on "pink slime"), the steak should be left out for an hour to come to room temperature before putting it in the pan. After that, it's probably cooked in 6-10 mins, but you have to watch it. https://www.jamieoliver.com/news-and-fe ... ect-steak/

So you basically replace the step of waiting for the meat to reach room temp, with bathing it.

Now, if you get a nice cut from the butcher, bring it home at pretty much room temp, and slam it right on the grill, or pan, I'll grant you that is super low prep. But you need some time for sides prep anyways. I think having that hour to kill is perfect either way.

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