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Asian Last Names Lead To Fewer Job Interviews, Still

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  • Mar 19th, 2017 10:06 pm
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Nov 6, 2010
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I wonder of the breakdown. The article lumps South and East Asian together (as they are all Asians), but I wonder whether for example, Indian/Pakistani names fare better or worse than Chinese/Korean/Japanese ones?

And what about Asians vs other ethnicities? Like Middle Eastern or African? I don't really think it's news that ethnic (or hard to pronounce) last names still statistically result in fewer callbacks, but I would be interested in the breakdown because that would in theory better show where the bias. For example, in light of the political situation in the Middle East, are Middle Easterners viewed as worse than Asians, even though both are viewed as worse than Anglo-Saxons?
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Mar 8, 2015
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I've never had a problem getting job interviews, mind you i'm a CBC and have an English first name. I can see a full on Chinese name being a turn off as there's bias that the individual won't be up to par on their English skills, but a well written cover letter/resume should quash those doubts. I've had FOB friends who are successful in finding jobs relating to their field of study and many who work low-end retail jobs, the former group all have one thing in common: they aren't scared to learn, communicate, and socialize in English so its not a coincidence they are more successful. You need to be able to adapt to your environment, I understand white people working in an Asian country aren't held to as high a standard when it comes to speaking the local language Vs. English over there, but the reality is English is still the most universal language, especially for business. Plus Asian or not, so long as you do a good job net working and are personable and presentable, you should be able to close any gaps on any bias towards your apparent lack of English skills.
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I am part of this minority. This is why I make sure I prominently write on my resume that I'm originally from Ontario, Canada.

While it's true that racism is bad, the real issue is not actually race. It's about ability to communicate with and relate to your co-workers and management. And if you're from another culture and/or your English language skills have room for improvement, there can be issues in this department.
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Dec 16, 2015
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Just adopt some cool english sounding names. Like most fillipinos. For example, Voltster Hydraus. Or Everluna Florrisa.
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Mar 15, 2017
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^^ is that how Filipinos have Spanish sounding last names? What sort of names would they have as birth names? I'm just curious.
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Nov 19, 2014
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allchooedup wrote:
Mar 5th, 2017 12:45 am
I've never had a problem getting job interviews, mind you i'm a CBC and have an English first name. I can see a full on Chinese name being a turn off as there's bias that the individual won't be up to par on their English skills, but a well written cover letter/resume should quash those doubts. I've had FOB friends who are successful in finding jobs relating to their field of study and many who work low-end retail jobs, the former group all have one thing in common: they aren't scared to learn, communicate, and socialize in English so its not a coincidence they are more successful. You need to be able to adapt to your environment, I understand white people working in an Asian country aren't held to as high a standard when it comes to speaking the local language Vs. English over there, but the reality is English is still the most universal language, especially for business. Plus Asian or not, so long as you do a good job net working and are personable and presentable, you should be able to close any gaps on any bias towards your apparent lack of English skills.
The article isn't necessarily about "not" getting a trouble, it's about more difficulty getting a job due to bias. Just because you have a job doesn't mean there hasn't been discrimination in the job market towards you.

How many Asians do you know with marketing jobs in Canada? How many CMOs or VP of Marketing? Advertising? If you got an MBA out of UofT in Marketing, do you think you'd land as well as Cameron Smith or Mike Shaughnessy?

And for a country that always preaches multiculturalism and criticizes the U.S. for xenophobia, it's funny this type of thing isn't more heavily discussed on CBC or CTV news and shows. Is Canada really more open and multicultural than the U.S.?
I'm At The W, But I Can't Meet You In The Lobby, Girl I Gotta Watch My Back, Cuz I'm Not Just Anybody, I Seen Em' Stand In Line, Just To Get Beside Her, That's When We Disappear, You Need GPS To Find Her, Oh That Was Your Girl? I Thought I Recognized Her."
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Mar 29, 2012
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RaraAvis7 wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 1:35 am
^^ is that how Filipinos have Spanish sounding last names? What sort of names would they have as birth names? I'm just curious.
filipino checking in. most of our names are english. our language is practically a different version of spanish. so a lot of filipinos have spanish last names. first names are pretty much english names. my first name is james.
uber_shnitz wrote:
Mar 3rd, 2017 2:22 pm
I wonder of the breakdown. The article lumps South and East Asian together (as they are all Asians), but I wonder whether for example, Indian/Pakistani names fare better or worse than Chinese/Korean/Japanese ones?

And what about Asians vs other ethnicities? Like Middle Eastern or African? I don't really think it's news that ethnic (or hard to pronounce) last names still statistically result in fewer callbacks, but I would be interested in the breakdown because that would in theory better show where the bias. For example, in light of the political situation in the Middle East, are Middle Easterners viewed as worse than Asians, even though both are viewed as worse than Anglo-Saxons?
middle easterns have it bad too. i know a guy from the kurdistan regions who wants to change his entire name because of all the muslim phobia going around. especially if he wants to move to the states. everyone there has muslim phobia. and his first name is muhammad.
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SquirreI wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 9:52 pm
middle easterns have it bad too. i know a guy from the kurdistan regions who wants to change his entire name because of all the muslim phobia going around. especially if he wants to move to the states. everyone there has muslim phobia. and his first name is muhammad.
Oh man i remember a dude back in high school with the name osama

Image

That name carried lot of baggage. It's like someone having name Hitler on their resume
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Nov 24, 2011
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I'd like to know what names they were using. If their idea of a random anglo name is "Sam Vanderbilt" and their idea of a random Chinese name is "Sum Ting Wong", then it'll be no surprise lol
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One time this huge 6 foot 6 black guy chasing after a guy saying "hey!!! Come back!!!".
The guy started running for his life. But the black guy was too fast & caught up.
Then he said "excuse me sir... you dropped this envelope full of hundred dollar bills in front of the bank.".

True story... im a bank teller and the huge black guy was a customer waiting in line & helped me chase him down....

He's actually a nice guy with a job & education...

Bias do exist. Its human nature. We can't fix it... but we can recognize it and try. We can't just sweep it under the rug.
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Nov 19, 2014
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From my experience, the job market in Canada was brutal (especially on the Westcoast). I don't doubt Asian-ness had something to do with it.

Most of the Asians I know in the Vancouver area with business degrees that managed to keep jobs in the city are working real estate jobs (agents, brokers, some are self-employed developers). The others are in retail banks. I know a slim amount working at the Big 4 accounting firms. If we somehow were given the numbers, I'm guessing these accounting firms hire non-Asians at a much higher rate.

We're talking out of the 2 best business schools in B.C. too, UBC Sauder and SFU Beedie. A good percentage of them end up getting discouraged and moving back to Hong Kong.

In B.C., the best corporations to work for seem to be: 1) natural resources; 2) food & hospitality; 3) retail. Both are dominated by white people who very likely didn't go to SFU Beedie.

When you look at the major restaurant chains like Cactus Club or Earl's management core (2 huge employers in BC), unless you're looking in Accounting, you won't find many Asian guys. Same goes for stuff like Lululemon at Management. You might find an Asian guy at Cactus or Lululemon if he's "fabuuuuuuulous"

You'll find tons of white guys, white girls, and Asian girls at every level across departments. Lots of them from Capilano or Langara College.
I'm At The W, But I Can't Meet You In The Lobby, Girl I Gotta Watch My Back, Cuz I'm Not Just Anybody, I Seen Em' Stand In Line, Just To Get Beside Her, That's When We Disappear, You Need GPS To Find Her, Oh That Was Your Girl? I Thought I Recognized Her."
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User699930 wrote:
Mar 2nd, 2017 5:29 pm
I can tell you from personal experience that most asians lack social and language skills.

However, they make up for it because asians are hard working, talented, and can speak chinese.
A Company who discriminates against hiring asians is idiotic and losing alot of talent IMO.

I am asian also but I have a really cool sounding name that sort of combos the first and last name together.

Btw I am not talented or very hard working. I actually put real asians to shame with how lazy I am.

But what people need to understand is that there are a billion asian people. We have an huge pool of talent and diversity. You can't discriminate against such a large group.
You said it yourself, it's a lack of social and language skills. Even if you're a programmer, you still need these things to function in a workplace. Most hiring managers and HR types are looking for 80% language and social skills because that's the currency they deal in. The actual technical skills that actually make a company money, they don't have the first inkling about how to evaluate that.
Check out caRpetbomBer's picks in this thread.
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Syne wrote:
Mar 17th, 2017 1:12 pm
You said it yourself, it's a lack of social and language skills. Even if you're a programmer, you still need these things to function in a workplace. Most hiring managers and HR types are looking for 80% language and social skills because that's the currency they deal in. The actual technical skills that actually make a company money, they don't have the first inkling about how to evaluate that.
Define "social"?

Can you honestly say that most of the Asian Canadians you know are less affable, friendly or easy-going than the average white Canadian? I can't.
I'm At The W, But I Can't Meet You In The Lobby, Girl I Gotta Watch My Back, Cuz I'm Not Just Anybody, I Seen Em' Stand In Line, Just To Get Beside Her, That's When We Disappear, You Need GPS To Find Her, Oh That Was Your Girl? I Thought I Recognized Her."
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Corner3 wrote:
Mar 17th, 2017 1:33 pm
Define "social"?

Can you honestly say that most of the Asian Canadians you know are less affable, friendly or easy-going than the average white Canadian? I can't.
here is an alternate fact, white people is a minority in uw, and my classmates all have good jobs
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UrbanPoet wrote:
Mar 17th, 2017 12:34 pm
Bias do exist. Its human nature. We can't fix it... but we can recognize it and try. We can't just sweep it under the rug.
That's good point

Some people just wanna continue living the lie. and that's okay if you feel comfortable with the lie -- but do be honest with yourself because being biased is neither good or bad. it's simply mechanism so we can make quick decision in this hectic world
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