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Ask a cleaning lady!

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  • Apr 14th, 2017 2:10 pm
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Member
Aug 14, 2009
317 posts
56 upvotes
petitallegra wrote:
Aug 11th, 2016 10:27 pm
alanbrenton wrote:
petitallegra wrote:
Aug 11th, 2016 3:16 pm
Well, it won't hurt the tiles, but it won't do a good job cleaning either. It especially won't do a good job on grout. If you have shine on your floor, it will leave a residue, unless you somehow rinse the floors after. I don't recommend using any products that soak the floor in water, especially not hardwood. So, overall my answer is no, but if you use it on tiles it won't hurt them (but won't clean them very well.)
So what would be a good liquid to use on these floors? Ours are not really shiny (there slight texture to them) except in the foyer.

If you are looking for a commercial cleaner, I like pledge floor cleaner concentrate for all floors. You mix it with water, and works well with my mop system. (Vileda refillable spray mop with reusable microfibre pads.) cuts grease, and doesn't dry hardwood out.
However, I actually prefer my own mix, which is:
40% cleaning vinegar
60% distilled water
2 squirts castille soap (whichever you like best, I like almond)
2-3 drops tea tree oil.
Shake it up, then let is sit overnight, works as a great all purpose mix, and does a great job on floors.

What castille soap do you use? I tried such a solution with Dr. Bronners and it curdled and turned to a thick goop. Thanks.
Deal Addict
Jan 28, 2014
2900 posts
423 upvotes
Praetorian wrote:
Aug 8th, 2016 11:15 pm
Hi,

How would you handle a garbage can that had been overtaken by maggots? Despite tying up all our garbage bags tightly and being kept in a garbage can closed with a lid, maggots would keep appearing no matter how much insecticide I would spray in the can.

Any advice on how/where to keep the garbage can so as not to deal with this problem? This mainly occurs in the summer with the hot weather.

Thanks again!
Depending on how many people are in your family and/or if you have a freezer (in our case it is just the 2 of us and the dog and only the fridge freezer), I keep meat scraps and anything else that will likely attract maggots in a bag in the freezer (or the fridge) depending on what it is - in a very tight bag. I don't buy things with bones due to said dog - he is very handy and can jump. The maggot attracting items (or at least most of them) are put in the bin by 7:00 a.m. as is required. Some things of course have to go in the garbage which is only picked up every 2 weeks so I am very careful.

Many years ago we went through a maggot issue - never again. It was purely accidental.

I have seen pictures of the new organics bins - the ones with the holes in them caused by the squirrels. I have also seen raccoons in the middle of the afternoon sitting on front porches having their lunch.
[OP]
Member
Jan 15, 2011
369 posts
160 upvotes
Mississauga
lavar wrote:
petitallegra wrote:
Aug 11th, 2016 10:27 pm
alanbrenton wrote: So what would be a good liquid to use on these floors? Ours are not really shiny (there slight texture to them) except in the foyer.

If you are looking for a commercial cleaner, I like pledge floor cleaner concentrate for all floors. You mix it with water, and works well with my mop system. (Vileda refillable spray mop with reusable microfibre pads.) cuts grease, and doesn't dry hardwood out.
However, I actually prefer my own mix, which is:
40% cleaning vinegar
60% distilled water
2 squirts castille soap (whichever you like best, I like almond)
2-3 drops tea tree oil.
Shake it up, then let is sit overnight, works as a great all purpose mix, and does a great job on floors.

What castille soap do you use? I tried such a solution with Dr. Bronners and it curdled and turned to a thick goop. Thanks.
That's totally normal, it will curdle and goop. You need to shake it really really good, then let it settle for 24 hours, and it will clear right up :) make sure you are only doing two short squirts, you don't need a lot. I like the Dr Bronners almond, or peppermint. (Almond is better for wood floors, but peppermint smells so great!)
Newbie
Aug 3, 2016
64 posts
14 upvotes
What solution should I use for :

1. Cleaning bathtub.

2. Cleaning bathroom tiles and the grout between them.

I used vinegar and scrubbing bubbles, they were OK , but I need something better. Something that I spray or apply and ket is sit for few hours and then wipe it off, without too much effort and hard scrubbing.
Sr. Member
Jan 3, 2008
944 posts
38 upvotes
I do have the same questions. My grout has turned to different color (that bad) on tiles above bath tub. This weekend I used steam to clean with Clorox spray and it did an ok job. I have tried many solutions so far and clorox has given me better results. What solution do you recommend to clean the mold on the tub sealant?

This weekend I may try to use baking soda and vinegar to clean tiles even further.
Jasonoradrian wrote:
Aug 13th, 2016 2:13 am
What solution should I use for :

1. Cleaning bathtub.

2. Cleaning bathroom tiles and the grout between them.

I used vinegar and scrubbing bubbles, they were OK , but I need something better. Something that I spray or apply and ket is sit for few hours and then wipe it off, without too much effort and hard scrubbing.
Newbie
Dec 30, 1969
16 posts
1 upvote
Bowmanville, ON
We bought a sofa and two reclining chairs, bonded leather. Still had tags on them, excellent condition, but sat in a house where the owner smoked. We didn't even realize how bad the smell was until we put them in our smoke free home. Ugh I feel so bad for buying them but we got an excellent deal. Any way to remove the smoke smell from bonded leather? I am currently trying baking soda in baby socks and bounce sheets strategically placed in the crevices of the reclining chair. In those particular spot it seemed to work. I won't be able to get at the whole chair this way unless I invent some sort of baking soda/bounce sheet contraption. Would so appreciate some suggestions on how to get rid of the smell.
Newbie
User avatar
Jul 21, 2005
86 posts
24 upvotes
AJ1980 wrote:
Nov 1st, 2016 2:48 pm
We bought a sofa and two reclining chairs, bonded leather. Still had tags on them, excellent condition, but sat in a house where the owner smoked. We didn't even realize how bad the smell was until we put them in our smoke free home. Ugh I feel so bad for buying them but we got an excellent deal. Any way to remove the smoke smell from bonded leather? I am currently trying baking soda in baby socks and bounce sheets strategically placed in the crevices of the reclining chair. In those particular spot it seemed to work. I won't be able to get at the whole chair this way unless I invent some sort of baking soda/bounce sheet contraption. Would so appreciate some suggestions on how to get rid of the smell.
Good luck. I was given an amazing leather sectional for free, and ended up getting rid of it because we couldn't eliminate the damn smoke smell. I think the only thing that would work is to take it apart completely, spray the frame with some kind of odour killing primer, and put in all new stuffing.
[OP]
Member
Jan 15, 2011
369 posts
160 upvotes
Mississauga
AJ1980 wrote:
Nov 1st, 2016 2:48 pm
We bought a sofa and two reclining chairs, bonded leather. Still had tags on them, excellent condition, but sat in a house where the owner smoked. We didn't even realize how bad the smell was until we put them in our smoke free home. Ugh I feel so bad for buying them but we got an excellent deal. Any way to remove the smoke smell from bonded leather? I am currently trying baking soda in baby socks and bounce sheets strategically placed in the crevices of the reclining chair. In those particular spot it seemed to work. I won't be able to get at the whole chair this way unless I invent some sort of baking soda/bounce sheet contraption. Would so appreciate some suggestions on how to get rid of the smell.
Yikes! Okay, most likely the smell is even in the wood and foam filling, and even that fabric that lines the base. You would have to address all of these surfaces. While the exterior surfaces may be salvageable, anything on the interior, like the foam, won't be able to be addressed, without cutting into the couch.
Maybe you could try wiping it down with essential oils, and even orange oil, to at least mask the scent. But, you'll have to do it regularly.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 14, 2005
10297 posts
1325 upvotes
City of Vancouver
What injuries or repetitive stress has the OP sustained through work? eg. any back problems? shoulder problems? problems focusing eyesight?
[OP]
Member
Jan 15, 2011
369 posts
160 upvotes
Mississauga
Becks wrote:
Nov 1st, 2016 6:31 pm
What injuries or repetitive stress has the OP sustained through work? eg. any back problems? shoulder problems? problems focusing eyesight?
My knees are pretty bad, because I am getting up and down from squat positions all day. My feet used to be aching for the first year or two, but now I'm totally used to it, most days the only sitting I do in a 12 hour period is the car drive between clients!
My arms/forearms are very strong, and I have a grip that rivals a heavy weight body builder, lol. Seems to stave off the carpal tunnel for now. I try to scrub with both arms equally, because after my first year, I noticed my dominant arm was getting bigger. Now I'm pretty even. But, at home, there is no jar that can't be opened, lol!
My back goes through phases, mainly after move in/outs, because of climbing into cabinets, and longer periods scrubbing the heavy stuff.
No issues with eyesight. I would think someone in an office setting would have more issues than me, as I work in natural daylight, instead of staring at screens, and florescent overhead lighting.
I also rarely get sick! I just got over an illness, that was the first one in many, many years! If only that was true for my kids, lol!
Sr. Member
Jan 1, 2013
569 posts
106 upvotes
Durham
What is the best way to get grout between tiles in the stand up shower clean again like new? The lower part seems moldy

Thanks,
[OP]
Member
Jan 15, 2011
369 posts
160 upvotes
Mississauga
It depends. Black mold can stain, so depending on how long it's been there, even when you clean it,the stain will remain in the grout.
Use a nylon bristle brush, and vim (bleach-free) and give it a big scrub. Let it sit for 10 minutes, then mist with cleaning vinegar, and wipe clean. Rinse everything after.
If there is residual darkness, sometimes a grey color, unfortunately the mold sat too long, and has stained the grout.
You can buy a grout paint pen, but they don't work great on showers, because it rinses away over time.
Member
Dec 1, 2006
285 posts
14 upvotes
Question. Cleanliness of the house is a constant struggle, with the biggest challenge for us being clutter (random stuff everywhere making it difficult to clean). I always assumed that cleaners won't pick up your junk, therefore I would have to tidy before it is cleaned. How do you deal with this? Junk is clothes, paper, pantry items, dishes, etc... Not garbage.
[OP]
Member
Jan 15, 2011
369 posts
160 upvotes
Mississauga
That's correct, we don't pick up clutter and junk. It depends on the level of clutter, to determine how we handle it.
A couple shirts on the floor, I pick them up and fold and place them somewhere visible, but out of the path of the vacuum. Giant laundry mountain, I vacuum around.
A couple of bills, pens, glasses on the kitchen counter, I wipe underneath, and place back neatly. Anything more than 5-6 items, I push aside best I can, and go around.
Anything heavy, I don't move. 1-2 dishes in the sink, I wash, and put in the drying rack. Sink full of dishes, I stack neatly, hopefully on a towel or paper towel, to not dirty the freshly cleaned counter.
I don't open cabinets, drawers, or closets. And I don't touch personal care items, except to carefully move it aside as I clean. I don't know what is important to a client, or what is junk, so I never move things out of the area it's already in, in case my client needs to find it later. And I never throw out anything that's not in the trash. Who knows what million dollar idea they sketched on that napkin ? ;)
The thing is, you get more bang for your buck with a cleaner when there isn't clutter. If areas of the house are inaccessible, they can't be cleaned.
Final thought: your family uses your home, in the way that works best for you. If you have clutter, you can still have a cleaner, because as long as you aren't a hoarder, bathrooms, kitchens, and the majority of surfaces will still be cleaned. Cleaners don't judge. Truly. I have clients in humble 2 bd condos, with zero clutter, to 6 bd mansions with piles of stuff. I'm just there to clean. BUT...... Guess which home looks amazing when I'm done?
Coming home to a clean house, with piles of clutter, laundry, and dirty dishes, no matter how tidy the pile, never quite gives you the same feeling!
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