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Jan 11, 2008
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Thanks for this thread!

Do you often have patients who don't want or decline x-rays?

I don't go to the dentist as often as recommended (about every 4 years), but take good care of my teeth. I only have 2 fillings and haven't had a cavity in over 20 years. The dentist always says my teeth are in better shape than those that come every 6 months.

I went to a new dentist recently and did do the full set of x-rays, but don't feel I need them on a regular basis.

I am planning to start going regularly only so I can start getting my almost 3 year old used to and comfortable with going to the dentist.

The thing is, I don't want x-rays for my daughter or me very often. I know the radiation is supposed to be low but I don't feel comfortable with it or feel it is necessary for us.

I find I get a lot of pressure to get x-rays. Do ever get patients who decline x-rays and if so, do you still treat them? I often feel I'm being told I must have them.

Thanks!
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[OP]
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Dec 12, 2016
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sillysimms wrote:
Dec 20th, 2016 10:26 pm
Thanks for this thread!

Do you often have patients who don't want or decline x-rays?

I don't go to the dentist as often as recommended (about every 4 years), but take good care of my teeth. I only have 2 fillings and haven't had a cavity in over 20 years. The dentist always says my teeth are in better shape than those that come every 6 months.

I went to a new dentist recently and did do the full set of x-rays, but don't feel I need them on a regular basis.

I am planning to start going regularly only so I can start getting my almost 3 year old used to and comfortable with going to the dentist.

The thing is, I don't want x-rays for my daughter or me very often. I know the radiation is supposed to be low but I don't feel comfortable with it or feel it is necessary for us.

I find I get a lot of pressure to get x-rays. Do ever get patients who decline x-rays and if so, do you still treat them? I often feel I'm being told I must have them.

Thanks!
Hi sillysimms,

Thank you for your question.

I do have patients that decline x-rays or want to take them less frequently. Like you mentioned, the radiation is very low, especially with new technology such as digital x-rays. In fact, a flight to New York would expose you to as much radiation as quite a few x-rays. Regardless, I still respect my patients' decisions because at the end of the day, it is their body.

Especially for a patient like yourself, where you haven't had a cavity in over 20 years, the risks are much lower than someone that has cavities at every visit. In this case, I would be more comfortable to prolong the time between x-rays. I do warn the patient that x-rays are a valuable diagnostic tool, because they show us areas which we cannot see with our eyes (in between the teeth, bone levels).

However, I would never pressure a patient to get x-rays. I would definitely still treat them just like any other patient. If you are feeling uncomfortable or feel pressured, I would consider finding a dentist that shares a common philosophy with you.

Hope that helps!
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Jul 7, 2005
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AskADentist wrote:
Dec 15th, 2016 11:35 am
Hi pfbmgd,

The cost of implants is always a popular questions from patients that are interested in implants. A molar implant, which comprises of the implant itself and the crown on top will be around $3000-5000.

You may ask why that there is such a large range for the price, so let me explain some factors that may influence the price.

The first is the provider that will be placing the implant. Many dentists including general dentists and specialists, such as oral surgeons and periodontists, can place implants. Their expertise and experience can play a large factor on how much they charge for the implant surgery. For example, an oral surgeon specialist who has done 1000 implants will probably charge more than a general dentist who has only placed 50.

The second is that there are many brands of implants. It may be a surprise to some people but there are MANY implant companies, over 300+. Some of the implant companies have been around a long time and have the most research and history. Some are much newer so they do not have this. In general, the older companies tend to be more expensive.

As well, you have to be careful when getting prices. Sometimes when quotes are given, they do not include the crown portion, which is the actual tooth that goes on top. As well, there are different costs associated with different materials for the crown as well.

The first step for getting an implant would be to get a consultation in order to assess your mouth and the area that you want the implant. For example, a mouth that is not in good condition with alot of gum disease is not an environment that is conducive to an implant succeeding. Another example is that there is not enough bone in the area for an implant, so you will require an additional procedure like a bone graft to build up the bone for an implant.

There is alot of information so let me know if you have any other questions.
How about replacing all your teeth with some sort of implants. Healthy gums and bone. How would you go about doing this and what would you charge?

What would you recommendations to a patient asking for this, whether its for or against and why. The patients teeth are intact and functioning fine. No special circumstances. Over 65% of teeth are filled.
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A senile family member stopped brushing their teeth regularly, and they eat sugary foods every day. How long before the crap hits the fan?
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Dec 12, 2016
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linsook wrote:
Dec 21st, 2016 10:25 am
How about replacing all your teeth with some sort of implants. Healthy gums and bone. How would you go about doing this and what would you charge?

What would you recommendations to a patient asking for this, whether its for or against and why. The patients teeth are intact and functioning fine. No special circumstances. Over 65% of teeth are filled.
Hi linsook,

Thank you for your question.

I am not sure if I am understanding your question correctly. You are asking if it would be a good idea to replace all your teeth with implants, even if the patient has intact teeth with healthy gums and bone and is functioning fine?

Even if 65% of the teeth are filled, there is nothing wrong with this. While implants are a great option for replacement of missing teeth, my philosophy is that your natural teeth will always be better than any type of replacement.

As well, once you go into full arch implant solutions, the difficulty and cost is significantly higher.

Hope that answers your question. Let me know if I misunderstood at all.
[OP]
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Dec 12, 2016
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Becks wrote:
Dec 21st, 2016 7:28 pm
A senile family member stopped brushing their teeth regularly, and they eat sugary foods every day. How long before the crap hits the fan?
Hi becks,

It depends on what you mean by "crap hits the fan".

While some people may be more or less prone to getting cavities, it is very likely that your family member will start to get them with poor oral hygiene and a diet with sugary food.

As well, gum/periodontal disease with bone loss are very likely with poor oral hygiene as well. The rate of cavities and gum disease is quite varied from one individual to the next, but is inevitable given the circumstances.

My best guess is that cavities would start to form and progressively get bigger from 6-12 months. Often times, when I have seen this happen, the cavities either get so large that the teeth break, or cause pain from infection. If periodontal disease progresses before this happens, the teeth will become very loose. Either way, both of these leads to multiple if not all teeth to need to be extracted in the long run.
Sr. Member
Jul 7, 2005
698 posts
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North York
AskADentist wrote:
Dec 22nd, 2016 8:33 am
Hi linsook,

Thank you for your question.

I am not sure if I am understanding your question correctly. You are asking if it would be a good idea to replace all your teeth with implants, even if the patient has intact teeth with healthy gums and bone and is functioning fine?

Even if 65% of the teeth are filled, there is nothing wrong with this. While implants are a great option for replacement of missing teeth, my philosophy is that your natural teeth will always be better than any type of replacement.

As well, once you go into full arch implant solutions, the difficulty and cost is significantly higher.

Hope that answers your question. Let me know if I misunderstood at all.
Thanks, you answered what I wanted to know.
[OP]
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Dec 12, 2016
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linsook wrote:
Dec 22nd, 2016 10:51 am
Thanks, you answered what I wanted to know.
No problem! Glad that I could help.
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Aug 3, 2010
216 posts
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Thanks for the responses.

Curious..

1. What are your thoughts on recommending and offering 100% Xylitol sweetners and gums for your patients. I am baffled why no dentists do this. From what i've researched it seems like regular sugars should have been banned long ago from this country and replaced with xylitol since it prevents the bacteria from being able to metabolize any food and ultimately starve while at the same time it boosts the pH in your mouth -- hence, very low chance of cavity formation. And bonus of being able to be taken by diabetics in any quantity.

2. Although i've heard many-a-dentists mention using soft toothbrushes i have never found one who have given recommended brands. Too many toothbrushes on the market brag about being "Soft" because they know that is a selling point despite the brush being as rigid as nails. For that matter, there is no toothbrush on the market with a label bragging "Hard!" or "Extra Stiff!". It's always "Soft". Love to get your honest feedback and recommendations.

3. Because i've moved a lot i've had to go to different dentists (incl. 1 orthodontist and 1 periodontist) over the years and as i get to know him/her enough that we can have a casual conversation, i eventually ask the question: Do you love your job? And the answer has always been "No". More specifically, they have all consistently told me if they were to do it again, they would choose a different profession. Most times i never delve beyond that point since their facial expressions are very telling, but i figure most got into this industry because the profession pays very high and it is what drew them in at first, but once they became financially secure and the awe of financial freedom became an afterthought they began to realize they had other, more exciting interests that they had surpressed and now yearn for but feel its now lost. What are your thoughts on other dentists in your field and what you've discovered about their true feelings? Was money the driving factor for most?
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What is reasonable cost for a 45 min cleaning session?
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What do you think of the '6 month braces' being advertised, is it safer/effective than the usual 1-2 year braces?
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Why do some dishonest dentists lie about how many cavities a person has (especially when they have none!), while also never telling them how to live a lifestyle how not to get cavities? (brushing and flossing isn't good enough.)
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scoobydoo wrote:
Jan 10th, 2017 5:16 am
Why do some dishonest dentists lie about how many cavities a person has (especially when they have none!), while also never telling them how to live a lifestyle how not to get cavities? (brushing and flossing isn't good enough.)
How else wud they make money?? *welp*
If the glove don't fit you must acquit! #WINNING
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aznnorth wrote:
Jan 10th, 2017 10:49 pm
How else wud they make money?? *welp*
when the dolla is more important than care then i can see why some folks would have questionable attitude about the practice
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aznnorth wrote:
Jan 10th, 2017 10:49 pm
How else wud they make money?? *welp*
What's the point of going to a dentist if all they care about is making money and not making sure our dental health is good?

PS: I've had many dentists damage my teeth on purpose to make money and I'll get into that soon.
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