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Ask me anything about Executive Search / Recruitment

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 21st, 2017 10:46 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Jun 6, 2007
126 posts
3 upvotes

Ask me anything about Executive Search / Recruitment

Happy to answer any questions about this industry.
9 replies
Newbie
Sep 11, 2017
50 posts
17 upvotes
Are your placements FTE only or contractors as well?
[OP]
Jr. Member
Jun 6, 2007
126 posts
3 upvotes
FedExpress wrote:
Nov 7th, 2017 9:45 pm
Are your placements FTE only or contractors as well?
Only full time
Newbie
Sep 11, 2017
50 posts
17 upvotes
How important is Social IQ in placing a candidate and how as a recruiter can you determine if the candidate has the right IQ that the client wants?
[OP]
Jr. Member
Jun 6, 2007
126 posts
3 upvotes
FedExpress wrote:
Nov 8th, 2017 11:33 am
How important is Social IQ in placing a candidate and how as a recruiter can you determine if the candidate has the right IQ that the client wants?
I would correlate your question to emotional intelligence. It is important in general. At the executive levels, most meet baseline threshold otherwise they would not be an "executive".

Depending on the role, clients may care more or less for this (because smart clients know they cant have everything). E.g., CEO/EVP or SVP of Sales: very high need for it. SVP of technical operations... need it to be strong but can pass with lower if everything else is through the roof.

It is judged with competency based interviews, psychometric tests, and recruiters judgement.
Jr. Member
Jan 12, 2017
101 posts
24 upvotes
Is there a difference in the screening and recruitment process when an executive search firm is engaged vs typical in-house hr or is it a qualitative enhancement (ie more rigorous checks, more insightful feedback, more hands on/recommend candidates vs administrative)?

When companies use an executive search firm vs in-house HR for non-private companies/government/crown agencies, is there often more flexibility in compensation?

Thanks!
[OP]
Jr. Member
Jun 6, 2007
126 posts
3 upvotes
Chickennbeans wrote:
Nov 8th, 2017 1:11 pm
Is there a difference in the screening and recruitment process when an executive search firm is engaged vs typical in-house hr or is it a qualitative enhancement (ie more rigorous checks, more insightful feedback, more hands on/recommend candidates vs administrative)?

When companies use an executive search firm vs in-house HR for non-private companies/government/crown agencies, is there often more flexibility in compensation?

Thanks!
The top firms identify executives that are right for the role via their network (i.e., database with knowledge captured by colleagues around world). There are no job postings. Those potential candidates are reached out to and convinced to consider the opportunity - which is typically a step up for them based various factors (e.g., money, location, title, topic, company brand, etc.).

The premise is getting the best person for the job, not the available person for the job. And senior leaders know that the best person vs. an acceptable person can make a huge difference for their company's profitability.

These firms also guarantee placements - if anything goes wrong and the client no longer wants the candidate, the new search is free for up to a year. So finding the best is in both party's interest vs. finding whatever works and moving on.

In terms of compensation: i think you have a sounding board as the mediator when their is a recruiter involved. Good recruiters are transparent to both parties, with a slight bias towards the client (who is paying them).
Jr. Member
Jan 12, 2017
101 posts
24 upvotes
Very insightful. Thanks!
ColdRFD wrote:
Nov 8th, 2017 6:26 pm
The top firms identify executives that are right for the role via their network (i.e., database with knowledge captured by colleagues around world). There are no job postings. Those potential candidates are reached out to and convinced to consider the opportunity - which is typically a step up for them based various factors (e.g., money, location, title, topic, company brand, etc.).

The premise is getting the best person for the job, not the available person for the job. And senior leaders know that the best person vs. an acceptable person can make a huge difference for their company's profitability.

These firms also guarantee placements - if anything goes wrong and the client no longer wants the candidate, the new search is free for up to a year. So finding the best is in both party's interest vs. finding whatever works and moving on.

In terms of compensation: i think you have a sounding board as the mediator when their is a recruiter involved. Good recruiters are transparent to both parties, with a slight bias towards the client (who is paying them).
Deal Fanatic
Mar 15, 2005
5274 posts
798 upvotes
How does someone with good experience and an upward projecting career eventually break into an executive role? I saw a lot of this when I was at a senior analyst looking to enter management, I was commonly told "we only want people with management experience". How do you get that experience if nobody ever takes a chance on you? Regardless, I eventually broke through that barrier with some luck and being in the right place at the right time but I would imagine another glass ceiling will be there at the executive level. Any tips for someone to better position themselves for such a role? I'm probably 10 years+ out form it anyway, but always good to have a path.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Jun 6, 2007
126 posts
3 upvotes
Ziggy007 wrote:
Nov 21st, 2017 10:54 am
How does someone with good experience and an upward projecting career eventually break into an executive role? I saw a lot of this when I was at a senior analyst looking to enter management, I was commonly told "we only want people with management experience". How do you get that experience if nobody ever takes a chance on you? Regardless, I eventually broke through that barrier with some luck and being in the right place at the right time but I would imagine another glass ceiling will be there at the executive level. Any tips for someone to better position themselves for such a role? I'm probably 10 years+ out form it anyway, but always good to have a path.
As much as "right place, right time" might sound cliched, that's exactly what it is. However, right place means being top of mind when there is a need and right time means being ready with the skill set required. The best way to ensure those is staying connected with the leadership teams so they can trust you. This is important because essentially everyone is looking for a minion to make them look good and de-stress their lives. If they can trust you to be that person, than you are golden. The second piece around readiness requires taking on initiatives or transformation assignments that set you apart from the crowd. You will develop the skills that are needed for the next level by getting away from the day to day role.

Easiest way to think about it is if you are 8 people within a team, why should you be promoted to be everyone else's boss? Is everyone less capable than you in terms of taking on the next role.

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