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Ask me anything about home electrical requirements, electrical code, wiring, devices

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  • Apr 21st, 2017 2:42 pm
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Jr. Member
Jul 2, 2013
137 posts
8 upvotes
bpcrally wrote:
Feb 19th, 2017 2:48 pm
This is a fairly noob question, but im running wires through my unfinished (but framed ) basement and am wondering how to properly fasten them.

1 I see a couple different options with staples, plastic and metal ones.. Which should I steer towards as a fairly green DYI'er?
2 Any technique to fastening the cable with these? how tight should it be?
3 how far should the staples be from eachother. I read 5 ft but would like to confirm. I also read 8" from a box?
4 Does running the cable through joists/holes in framing count as a "support"? I assume so but want to confirm.
Are you getting this work inspected by ESA?
Sr. Member
User avatar
Oct 24, 2008
580 posts
174 upvotes
lehmanr wrote:
Feb 19th, 2017 8:09 pm
Are you getting this work inspected by ESA?
Is that how you get a permit? If so then yes. I was planning on having someone come into sign off on my work. Not exactly sure how that is all done yet or what is involved.
Member
User avatar
Mar 3, 2013
408 posts
213 upvotes
Newmarket
bpcrally wrote:
Feb 20th, 2017 11:01 am
Is that how you get a permit? If so then yes. I was planning on having someone come into sign off on my work. Not exactly sure how that is all done yet or what is involved.
Hi there, a permit needs to be applied for within 48 hours of commencing any electrical work. Call ESA at 1-877-372-7233 and apply for your permit. When you are done your rough-in you then call ESA to book a rough-in inspection.
When this rough-in inspection is passed, you can then install any insulation and drywall. When the installation is complete, you will call in for your final inspection.
You can read about the inspection process here https://www.esasafe.com/consumers/permi ... ed-to-know

I recommend you go to your local Chapters, Home Depot or even library and pick up a copy of P.S. Knights Electrical Code Simplified. If you read the book and follow it accordingly, you will likely pass without issues.

Good luck with your renovation and if you have any questions feel free to private message me.
A Licensed & Insured Electrical Contractor
Newbie
Feb 19, 2017
1 posts
attempting to install a range hood and hit a snag with the wiring. My source only has black and white wires while the hood includes a green ground that is screwed to the unit. any suggestions?
Member
User avatar
Mar 3, 2013
408 posts
213 upvotes
Newmarket
RJalexcity wrote:
Feb 20th, 2017 2:07 pm
attempting to install a range hood and hit a snag with the wiring. My source only has black and white wires while the hood includes a green ground that is screwed to the unit. any suggestions?
How old is your home and do you know if you have a grounded system or not?
A Licensed & Insured Electrical Contractor
Newbie
User avatar
Feb 28, 2016
49 posts
MrSparky wrote:
Feb 20th, 2017 11:23 am
Hi there, a permit needs to be applied for within 48 hours of commencing any electrical work. Call ESA at 1-877-372-7233 and apply for your permit. When you are done your rough-in you then call ESA to book a rough-in inspection.
When this rough-in inspection is passed, you can then install any insulation and drywall. When the installation is complete, you will call in for your final inspection.
You can read about the inspection process here https://www.esasafe.com/consumers/permi ... ed-to-know

I recommend you go to your local Chapters, Home Depot or even library and pick up a copy of P.S. Knights Electrical Code Simplified. If you read the book and follow it accordingly, you will likely pass without issues.

Good luck with your renovation and if you have any questions feel free to private message me.
This is probably the best tip you'll ever get from this thread. That is an awesome book that is easy to understand, it's worth every penny.
Member
Mar 3, 2009
426 posts
22 upvotes
I have a question about a non-functioning outlet.

The house is not that old, maybe mid-70's, and there is one outlet in the living-room that suddenly stopped working.

I've tried changing the fuse, but didn't help.

Wondering if there's a short somewhere or what it might be?

Thanks for any advice..
Member
User avatar
Mar 3, 2013
408 posts
213 upvotes
Newmarket
fred999 wrote:
Feb 22nd, 2017 11:50 am
I have a question about a non-functioning outlet.

The house is not that old, maybe mid-70's, and there is one outlet in the living-room that suddenly stopped working.

I've tried changing the fuse, but didn't help.

Wondering if there's a short somewhere or what it might be?

Thanks for any advice..
Is your house wired with aluminum wiring?
A Licensed & Insured Electrical Contractor
Member
Mar 3, 2009
426 posts
22 upvotes
MrSparky wrote:
Feb 22nd, 2017 12:21 pm
Is your house wired with aluminum wiring?
I don't know. How can I find out?

I doubt it though, I thought aluminum went out back in the fifties?

It's a townhouse, although it still has the old style fuses, the ones with the glass top that screw in.

It does have a few fuses that you just pull out, I suppose those are for the heavier load circuits like the furnace or whatever.

Thanks.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 19, 2008
4778 posts
813 upvotes
Whitby
fred999 wrote:
Feb 22nd, 2017 12:39 pm
I don't know. How can I find out?
I doubt it though, I thought aluminum went out back in the fifties?
Al was mainly installed in 60's and 70's in Ontario.

Wouldn't be a GFCI upstream from the receptacle not working? If not buy a $20 pen shaped voltage checker, remove cover on non working outlet and see if there is power to the outlet (at black wire). If so remove fuse, check power is now off and check wire connections.
If there is no power present when you check the non working receptacle check next receptacle upstream on that circuit the same way.
nomdesplumes:

"I wonder if adding extra electrical outlets is considered an electrical installation?"
Member
Mar 3, 2009
426 posts
22 upvotes
Zamboni wrote:
Feb 22nd, 2017 1:12 pm
Al was mainly installed in 60's and 70's in Ontario.

Wouldn't be a GFCI upstream from the receptacle not working? If not buy a $20 pen shaped voltage checker, remove cover on non working outlet and see if there is power to the outlet (at black wire). If so remove fuse, check power is now off and check wire connections.
If there is no power present when you check the non working receptacle check next receptacle upstream on that circuit the same way.
Thanks, but I don't know where the next upstream receptacle is. All the other receptacles seem to be working.

I guess what you're suggesting though, as a basic, is to just remove the cover and make sure the wires are not loose.

If they're not loose, then I have no other options except to get an electrician in?

What would be a normal charge for some diagnosis like that? And assuming there's some wiring issue, how would an electrician go about fixing that - opening up the wall somewhere to replace the wire?

If it is a wiring issue, could that be a fire hazard?
Newbie
User avatar
Feb 28, 2016
49 posts
What's the best bang for your buck when it comes to LED downlights/potlights? I'm doing a living room reno and looking at installing 4 new recessed lights in the insulated ceiling. I've seen some deeply discounted 6" LED potlight retrofit kits at Home Depot recently. I've been thinking of picking those up with some 6" potlights fixtures which would bring me in at about $35 per fixture.

LED Bulb
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Cree-TW-Seri ... /205337184

Housing
https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.new- ... 44648.html

The other option would be an LED recessed light like bellow. To get the similar amount of lumens as the above option I'd have to spend the $60 for the 6" version though.

https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.led- ... 26915.html

https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.4-in ... 12336.html

As mentioned, this is basically new construction so either one is an option. The second one is probably easier to accomplish, the first one the cheapest. Thoughts?
Member
User avatar
Mar 3, 2013
408 posts
213 upvotes
Newmarket
fred999 wrote:
Feb 22nd, 2017 2:08 pm
Thanks, but I don't know where the next upstream receptacle is. All the other receptacles seem to be working.

I guess what you're suggesting though, as a basic, is to just remove the cover and make sure the wires are not loose.

If they're not loose, then I have no other options except to get an electrician in?

What would be a normal charge for some diagnosis like that? And assuming there's some wiring issue, how would an electrician go about fixing that - opening up the wall somewhere to replace the wire?

If it is a wiring issue, could that be a fire hazard?
If you're not comfortable with electricity then getting an electrician in is your best option. Call a few electrical contractors and ask what their call out fee is, we don't know your location but it costs you nothing to ask what they would charge.
They may or may not need to cut open walls, you will not know the answer to that until the problem is diagnosed. Could be loose wiring, a bad marret joint, rodent damage etc.
You seem to have old wiring based on your panel still being equipped with fuses. And yes, loose or damaged wiring would be considered a fire hazard.
A Licensed & Insured Electrical Contractor
Member
User avatar
Mar 3, 2013
408 posts
213 upvotes
Newmarket
paintballdude05 wrote:
Feb 23rd, 2017 1:47 pm
What's the best bang for your buck when it comes to LED downlights/potlights? I'm doing a living room reno and looking at installing 4 new recessed lights in the insulated ceiling. I've seen some deeply discounted 6" LED potlight retrofit kits at Home Depot recently. I've been thinking of picking those up with some 6" potlights fixtures which would bring me in at about $35 per fixture.

LED Bulb
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Cree-TW-Seri ... /205337184

Housing
https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.new- ... 44648.html

The other option would be an LED recessed light like bellow. To get the similar amount of lumens as the above option I'd have to spend the $60 for the 6" version though.

https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.led- ... 26915.html

https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.4-in ... 12336.html

As mentioned, this is basically new construction so either one is an option. The second one is probably easier to accomplish, the first one the cheapest. Thoughts?
Your first option in my opinion will look dated. If you go with cans, you will also need to install a plastic vapor barrier boot.
The Slim led panel is the way to go. They are air tight and rated for direct contact with insulation. If you have blown in insulation, you should install a plastic booty for these so no mess is made if they ever need to be replaced.
Avoid the very last fixture you linked to at all costs, it's a piece of junk.
A Licensed & Insured Electrical Contractor
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