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Ask me anything about home electrical requirements, electrical code, wiring, devices

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  • Mar 27th, 2017 3:21 pm
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Newbie
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Feb 28, 2016
48 posts
Great, thanks for the professional insight on this! I'll have insulation bats between the trusses but over that will be blown-in insulation. If I wanted to put a similar light in my eaves would the slim LED panel be a good option also? I have plywood under the metal flashing so support wouldn't be an issue.
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Mar 3, 2013
395 posts
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Newmarket
paintballdude05 wrote:
Feb 23rd, 2017 2:30 pm
Great, thanks for the professional insight on this! I'll have insulation bats between the trusses but over that will be blown-in insulation. If I wanted to put a similar light in my eaves would the slim LED panel be a good option also? I have plywood under the metal flashing so support wouldn't be an issue.
You would need a fixture rated for damp locations. The panel in the home depot link lists that it is rated for dry only in the description, but the manufacturers website states they are also rated for damp.
A Licensed & Insured Electrical Contractor
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Oct 24, 2008
547 posts
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I have a question about electrical outlet vapour barriers.

As mentioned before we are finishing the basement. This is a town house so in the basement I only have 2 exterior walls (underground) that I'm working with.

There is some barrier and insulation on the walls but it only goes down about half way, then were is some other material on the lower half (see pic below).
Do I need to use a vapour barrier box around my outlets on these walls? If so, when using a vapour barrier over a device box, do I just cut slits in the top to pass the wire through?
Images
Sr. Member
Sep 11, 2006
750 posts
83 upvotes
bpcrally wrote:
Feb 24th, 2017 3:45 pm
I have a question about electrical outlet vapour barriers.

As mentioned before we are finishing the basement. This is a town house so in the basement I only have 2 exterior walls (underground) that I'm working with.

There is some barrier and insulation on the walls but it only goes down about half way, then were is some other material on the lower half (see pic below).
Do I need to use a vapour barrier box around my outlets on these walls? If so, when using a vapour barrier over a device box, do I just cut slits in the top to pass the wire through?
Thats not an electrical code its a building code. ESA shouldnt say anything if you dont vapor barrier your boxes. You can just use air tight plastic boxes on the perimiter though without the plastic booty I think. They have a foam seal that seals to the back of the drywall.
I hope you put paper down under your stud walls
Member
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Mar 3, 2013
395 posts
193 upvotes
Newmarket
bpcrally wrote:
Feb 24th, 2017 4:53 pm
You mean the poly plastic stuff? if so, yes that is under the walls.

So I shouldn't need to put anything like this on my outlet boxes?
http://www.rona.ca/en/vapour-barrier
I would add vapour barrier boots to the exterior plugs. You may get a draft or condensation in the box otherwise. Cut your wires in and tape the holes with tuck tape.
A Licensed & Insured Electrical Contractor
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Mar 23, 2008
2698 posts
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Edmonton
Question/request for comments on garage wiring...

My main panel for the property is in the garage (which runs an underground 100A line to the house), so no worries on power or breaker space.

Current have 3 circuits. One for lighting/opener, one for a single plug, and one double 100A breaker for the house I'd like to start wiring for more woodworking.

Plans include a 15A 220V circuit for my saw, and two 15A circuits for plugs. Lighting will stay on existing circuit, but bumped up to 4 or 5 LED tube fixtures.

The big question is protecting the wires. The garage is insulated and has wood interior walls (4" x 1/2" strips). The attic is open for storage and easy to move around in. My easy option seems to be surface mounting everything. This means either armoured cable or conduit. I'm leaning towards conduit. I can get by with a single run down two walls for the 2 plug circuits.

Any thoughts on the protection chosen? Or on metal conduit vs pvc?

C
Sr. Member
Aug 6, 2014
685 posts
151 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
i have a giant ceiling fan in my tiny bedroom that i want to remove and replace with a simple pendant light.

i couldn't find a pendant light that i liked, so i just bought a socket and some of that 18-2 lamp wire from canadian tire

first off, the socket doesn't have different coloured screws, they're both silver, so i have no idea how to tell where to connect the neutral wire (http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/levit ... p.html#srp this is what i bought)

secondly, since i have a old small house, i'm guessing the wire in the ceiling is probably 12-2 or 14-2... is it cool to just connect these directly to my 18-2 wires?

thanks!!
[OP]
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Oct 26, 2003
25805 posts
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Winnipeg
CNeufeld wrote:
Feb 27th, 2017 12:04 pm
Question/request for comments on garage wiring...

My main panel for the property is in the garage (which runs an underground 100A line to the house), so no worries on power or breaker space.

Current have 3 circuits. One for lighting/opener, one for a single plug, and one double 100A breaker for the house I'd like to start wiring for more woodworking.

Plans include a 15A 220V circuit for my saw, and two 15A circuits for plugs. Lighting will stay on existing circuit, but bumped up to 4 or 5 LED tube fixtures.

The big question is protecting the wires. The garage is insulated and has wood interior walls (4" x 1/2" strips). The attic is open for storage and easy to move around in. My easy option seems to be surface mounting everything. This means either armoured cable or conduit. I'm leaning towards conduit. I can get by with a single run down two walls for the 2 plug circuits.

Any thoughts on the protection chosen? Or on metal conduit vs pvc?

C
bx is the easiest to work with, especially with only 2 circuits.
Jr. Member
Apr 27, 2015
108 posts
66 upvotes
Toronto, ON
The pot lights in my basement doesnt seem to work anymore. At one time it was working but now when i turn on the dimmer switch it does not turn on.

I purchased one of these non contact voltage testers and put it near the switch and one of the light bulb outputs but nothing lit up.


What can be the issue? Thanks
Deal Addict
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Mar 23, 2008
2698 posts
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Edmonton
divx wrote:
Mar 4th, 2017 11:44 am
bx is the easiest to work with, especially with only 2 circuits.
After doing some pondering, it will likely be 4 circuits. 2 for outlets, one for my tablesaw (re-wired for 220v), and one for my heater (30A, 220v).

C
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Mar 23, 2008
2698 posts
844 upvotes
Edmonton
nkit88 wrote:
Mar 7th, 2017 3:53 pm
The pot lights in my basement doesnt seem to work anymore. At one time it was working but now when i turn on the dimmer switch it does not turn on.

I purchased one of these non contact voltage testers and put it near the switch and one of the light bulb outputs but nothing lit up.


What can be the issue? Thanks
If you have power at the switch but not at the light, I'd start by replacing the switch.

C
[OP]
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Oct 26, 2003
25805 posts
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Winnipeg
CNeufeld wrote:
Mar 7th, 2017 4:21 pm
After doing some pondering, it will likely be 4 circuits. 2 for outlets, one for my tablesaw (re-wired for 220v), and one for my heater (30A, 220v).

C
and another one for EV charger
Newbie
Dec 27, 2006
53 posts
7 upvotes
CNeufeld wrote:
Feb 27th, 2017 12:04 pm
Question/request for comments on garage wiring...

My main panel for the property is in the garage (which runs an underground 100A line to the house), so no worries on power or breaker space.

Current have 3 circuits. One for lighting/opener, one for a single plug, and one double 100A breaker for the house I'd like to start wiring for more woodworking.

Plans include a 15A 220V circuit for my saw, and two 15A circuits for plugs. Lighting will stay on existing circuit, but bumped up to 4 or 5 LED tube fixtures.

The big question is protecting the wires. The garage is insulated and has wood interior walls (4" x 1/2" strips). The attic is open for storage and easy to move around in. My easy option seems to be surface mounting everything. This means either armoured cable or conduit. I'm leaning towards conduit. I can get by with a single run down two walls for the 2 plug circuits.

Any thoughts on the protection chosen? Or on metal conduit vs pvc?

C
Well I'm no electrician but I recently completed a wiring project in my garage. In my setup the main panel is in the basement of the house. I ran 2AWG armoured aluminum wire to a disconnect in the garage and then connected a sub panel to that. I was faced with the same dilemma for the circuits. I wanted 1x30A 220V circuit for a heater, 1x60A 220V circuit for a hard wired welder and 2x15A 120V circuits; one for general use at my work bench and another one dedicated to my air compressor. My garage is drywall and I didn't want to go around punching holes in things so I decided right away to surface mount. I had considered going the BX route, but I had heard talk that BX wasn't acceptable for surface mounting in areas where it might receive mechanical damage. I'd been looking with envy at various EMT (metal) conduit installs so I decided to go that route instead of PVC. I bought this tool from Amazon on sale for $26 and change along with a 48" piece of 3/4" threaded steel gas line for the handle:

https://www.amazon.ca/Gardner-Bender-93 ... B00004WLJB

The level sights fell out and I don't like the way you determine the angles of the bends. Specifically the angle measurements are in the tear drop shaped areas; other benders have long lines for each angle and you bend the conduit until it's parallel with the line. It's going back; I don't recommend it.

In the end it turned out great and I highly recommend going the EMT route. The conduit is crazy cheap, I got it for $3.00 per 10 foot length of 1/2" from the local electrical contracting store. The bending really isn't that hard if you get a decent bender (there are Youtube videos). The parts you need are fairly cheap. You can run multiple circuits in one conduit run. The conduit itself can act as a ground so you don't need a separate ground wire. I don't have a fish and I don't like using stranded wire with plugs, so I bought solid T90/THHN from Home Depot for the 15A circuits which you can easily push instead of having to pull and I used stranded 10AWG for the short run needed for the 30A heater circuit. I recommend buying everything from your local electrical contracting shop (if they are decent) as in my area they were a good amount cheaper for everything compared to the big box stores and buy the T90/THHN wire from Home Depot/Lowes as the electrical contracting shops will only sell lower gauge wire in 500' lengths. Hope this helps, keep us posted on what you decide and how it turns out.
Deal Addict
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Mar 23, 2008
2698 posts
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Edmonton
Divx, the thought occurred to me, but given the relative ease in running new wire, I'm not inclined to do that yet. Since I don't see a PHEV in my near future. I am waiting to hear back from the local utility company about leasing some solar equipment, though. Which may mean significant panel changes, as well as cost benefits for a PHEV.

Theburner, if I go conduit, I'll probably just drop conduit from the ceiling to the surface box. So no bends. I can run normal unprotected wire in the attic, which will cut costs and time. Given that it's a shop area, I do like the extra protection of conduit.

Thanks for the input, all!

C
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