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Ask me anything about home electrical requirements, electrical code, wiring, devices

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  • Mar 27th, 2017 3:21 pm
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Jr. Member
Dec 15, 2013
128 posts
26 upvotes
TORONTO
If the ceiling in my shower is 7 ft, is that too low to install recessed lighting?
Member
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Mar 3, 2013
395 posts
193 upvotes
Newmarket
davidwsw wrote:
Mar 8th, 2017 1:53 pm
If the ceiling in my shower is 7 ft, is that too low to install recessed lighting?
No but the pot light must be WET rated.
A Licensed & Insured Electrical Contractor
Sr. Member
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Feb 25, 2015
681 posts
127 upvotes
York Region
Question for the experts. I have a couple of Leviton single pole Decora switches which I was going to give to my neighbor. I must of bought them about 8-10 years ago but never actually used them or notice the lack of grounding screw.

Are these OK to use or are they not recommended due to the whole not having a grounding screw issue.
Member
Jan 4, 2014
379 posts
77 upvotes
Toronto
bacalhau4me wrote:
Mar 11th, 2017 5:43 pm
Question for the experts. I have a couple of Leviton single pole Decora switches which I was going to give to my neighbor. I must of bought them about 8-10 years ago but never actually used them or notice the lack of grounding screw.

Are these OK to use or are they not recommended due to the whole not having a grounding screw issue.
Only switches I ever ground are dimmers. I've never used the ground screw on a regular switch and have never once had any inspector question it.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
6918 posts
445 upvotes
Toronto
ahumanbeing wrote:
Mar 11th, 2017 6:04 pm
Only switches I ever ground are dimmers. I've never used the ground screw on a regular switch and have never once had any inspector question it.
I have also never seen a switch grounded. Myself or others.
Member
Jan 4, 2014
379 posts
77 upvotes
Toronto
Drew_W wrote:
Mar 12th, 2017 8:57 am
I have also never seen a switch grounded. Myself or others.
I did once go to do work at a home owners place, and at one point or another, they had replaced all the devices and used the ground screw on every one of them. First time I'd ever seen it. Looked like a lot more work.
Sr. Member
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Feb 25, 2015
681 posts
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York Region
Thanks for your answers. I just replaced a faulty receptacle and a couple of dimmers recently so I when I didn't see the ground screw on these switches I started to wonder.
[OP]
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Oct 26, 2003
25805 posts
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Winnipeg
CNeufeld wrote:
Mar 8th, 2017 11:41 am
Divx, the thought occurred to me, but given the relative ease in running new wire, I'm not inclined to do that yet. Since I don't see a PHEV in my near future. I am waiting to hear back from the local utility company about leasing some solar equipment, though. Which may mean significant panel changes, as well as cost benefits for a PHEV.

Theburner, if I go conduit, I'll probably just drop conduit from the ceiling to the surface box. So no bends. I can run normal unprotected wire in the attic, which will cut costs and time. Given that it's a shop area, I do like the extra protection of conduit.

Thanks for the input, all!

C
Is Edmonton pushing solar now? Hydro here is giving out rebates for solar and I'm doing a presentation in house for solar panel installation next week. Also ev charging is already been considered for new development of the projects I'm overseeing. I been getting into revit and will look into 3d rendering so everything looks pretty, new tech rolling out keeps me busy.
Member
Dec 28, 2010
296 posts
3 upvotes
Maple
Builder didn't install dedicated GFCI outlets in my home but instead "linked" regular outlets to one GFCI outlet.

Example. My master ensuite and main bathroom on upper level are connected to the GFCI in my powder room. If the circuit trips in my master, I have to reset it in my powder room.

What's the purpose of this?
Member
Jan 4, 2014
379 posts
77 upvotes
Toronto
Bellotts wrote:
Mar 12th, 2017 2:58 pm
Builder didn't install dedicated GFCI outlets in my home but instead "linked" regular outlets to one GFCI outlet.

Example. My master ensuite and main bathroom on upper level are connected to the GFCI in my powder room. If the circuit trips in my master, I have to reset it in my powder room.

What's the purpose of this?
I've seen it done for two reasons. One, it saves material meaning only 1 gfci and only one feed. Two, in a small home where the first one applies, and if one trips it's not that far. I've also seen it where if the basement trips, you need to run up to the top floor to reset it. It's not wrong, but it is stupid in that case.

If it's annoying you could swap the regular receptacles with gfci and make sure all wires connect to the line side of it. That way the gfci itself will trip, but won't trip anything else, eliminating the need to run to another bathroom to reset
Member
Dec 28, 2010
296 posts
3 upvotes
Maple
ahumanbeing wrote:
Mar 12th, 2017 3:15 pm
I've seen it done for two reasons. One, it saves material meaning only 1 gfci and only one feed. Two, in a small home where the first one applies, and if one trips it's not that far. I've also seen it where if the basement trips, you need to run up to the top floor to reset it. It's not wrong, but it is stupid in that case.

If it's annoying you could swap the regular receptacles with gfci and make sure all wires connect to the line side of it. That way the gfci itself will trip, but won't trip anything else, eliminating the need to run to another bathroom to reset
Right on. Thanks for the clarification.

It's super annoying you're right and seems like a shortcut. I don't know anything about electrical so I'll probably leave it alone for my own sake lol.
Sr. Member
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Feb 25, 2015
681 posts
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York Region
Bellotts wrote:
Mar 12th, 2017 4:36 pm
Right on. Thanks for the clarification.

It's super annoying you're right and seems like a shortcut. I don't know anything about electrical so I'll probably leave it alone for my own sake lol.
Did you buy my old townhouse? lol. I had the same exact same "feature". The first time my wife tripped the master bathroom, took me while to figure out that I had to reset the power room. I even took out the receptacle and swapped it with another one to verify that it was working.
Deal Addict
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Mar 23, 2008
2698 posts
844 upvotes
Edmonton
Bellotts wrote:
Mar 12th, 2017 2:58 pm
Builder didn't install dedicated GFCI outlets in my home but instead "linked" regular outlets to one GFCI outlet.

Example. My master ensuite and main bathroom on upper level are connected to the GFCI in my powder room. If the circuit trips in my master, I have to reset it in my powder room.

What's the purpose of this?
I think my bigger concern might be why the GFCI circuit is breaking often enough for this to be an issue.

C
Member
Dec 28, 2010
296 posts
3 upvotes
Maple
CNeufeld wrote:
Mar 12th, 2017 5:52 pm
I think my bigger concern might be why the GFCI circuit is breaking often enough for this to be an issue.

C
Hasn't happened yet. Hopefully it doesn't.
Member
Dec 28, 2010
296 posts
3 upvotes
Maple
bacalhau4me wrote:
Mar 12th, 2017 5:46 pm
Did you buy my old townhouse? lol. I had the same exact same "feature". The first time my wife tripped the master bathroom, took me while to figure out that I had to reset the power room. I even took out the receptacle and swapped it with another one to verify that it was working.
Nope a new build!
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