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Ask me anything about home electrical requirements, electrical code, wiring, devices

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  • Jul 21st, 2017 1:15 pm
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Sr. Member
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Oct 24, 2008
615 posts
180 upvotes
Drew_W wrote:
Mar 20th, 2017 9:26 am
1104. 2011FBAR for exterior walls.

You may like the additional space a 2001R provides though versus a metal box, especially if you have dimmers to install (or floor heating thermostats or GFIs or whatever). Plastic boxes are also usually cheaper than metal.
Thanks, I have 2 dimmers so I'll check out the 2001R/ deeper box for those vs the outlets.
Jr. Member
Jan 30, 2015
189 posts
73 upvotes
Toronto
Drew_W wrote:
Mar 20th, 2017 9:20 am
If it's a single gang box use an 1111. NMD90 is fine.
Unfortunately it is going to be two dimmers and a switch. I presume I need a deep box for that. I am trying to avoid bumping out the wall if I can avoid ir
Deal Addict
Jun 7, 2008
1858 posts
16 upvotes
Toronto
Apparently I have quite a few reversed polarity outlets in my home that I recently moved into.
What is the approximate cost to fix each outlet, and is this something that can be DIY'ed? Thanks!
Newbie
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Feb 28, 2016
50 posts
It's fairly easy to DIY the outlets. You might also want to take the opportunity to update your outlets and switches while you're at it (if needed). If you're hiring somebody to do it, I'd figure 10 minutes or so per plug, factor in the electricians minimum call out rate as well as their hourly rate.
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May 1, 2003
6468 posts
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Is there any difference between a slim breaker and a standard width breaker aside from physical size? I had a couple breakers in my panel replaced with skinny ones because the panel was full, and I needed some room. The guy I had out said the only difference was price because the wider breakers that came with the panel and were cheap. Is that true?
Member
Jan 4, 2014
411 posts
90 upvotes
Toronto
bionicbadger wrote:
Mar 21st, 2017 3:44 pm
Is there any difference between a slim breaker and a standard width breaker aside from physical size? I had a couple breakers in my panel replaced with skinny ones because the panel was full, and I needed some room. The guy I had out said the only difference was price because the wider breakers that came with the panel and were cheap. Is that true?
No difference. They work the same. Some panels don't come with them, but most now a days allow you too. It may be an issue if you're whole panel is filled with them, but replacing them here or there won't do anything.
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Oct 19, 2008
4930 posts
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Whitby
tragd wrote:
Mar 21st, 2017 1:23 pm
Apparently I have quite a few reversed polarity outlets in my home that I recently moved into.
What is the approximate cost to fix each outlet, and is this something that can be DIY'ed? Thanks!
You might not have as many to fix as you think...if the polarity is reversed on 1 receptacle every receptacle downstream will also be reversed.
nomdesplumes:

"I wonder if adding extra electrical outlets is considered an electrical installation?"
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Jan 4, 2014
411 posts
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Toronto
Zamboni wrote:
Mar 21st, 2017 5:00 pm
You might not have as many to fix as you think...if the polarity is reversed on 1 receptacle every receptacle downstream will also be reversed.
This is not true. Fixing one will not fix the rest. They'll each have to be checked. I would suggest buying a cheap plug tester from Canadian tire and checking your outlets. It will help you determine what needs to be changed.
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Oct 19, 2008
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ahumanbeing wrote:
Mar 21st, 2017 7:33 pm
This is not true. Fixing one will not fix the rest. They'll each have to be checked.
I didn't say not to check all the receptacles. What I posted is true, take a minute and think about it. White and black wires are reversed on outlet 3 of a circuit, white is then hot on the circuit downstream on every outlet tested. Fix the one miswired outlet and black is now hot on every outlet downstream. Fixing one fixed the rest.
nomdesplumes:

"I wonder if adding extra electrical outlets is considered an electrical installation?"
Member
Jan 4, 2014
411 posts
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Toronto
Zamboni wrote:
Mar 21st, 2017 8:08 pm
I didn't say not to check all the receptacles. What I posted is true, take a minute and think about it. White and black wires are reversed on outlet 3 of a circuit, white is then hot on the circuit downstream on every outlet tested. Fix the one miswired outlet and black is now hot on every outlet downstream. Fixing one fixed the rest.
This is only true if the outlet had one pair that was hooked up wrong, but not the other. Chances are someone reversing the polarity is doing it wrong on both sets of wires ie both blacks on left side of receptacle and both whites on right side. If two or three receptacles are all wired reverse polarity, and you only fix one, it will be correct, but the others won't, as your hot wire is still connected to the incorrect terminal on the other receptacles.

Edit: Here's a photo to explain. Image
Correcting the wires on receptacle A does not change the polarity on B, it must also be changed.
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Oct 19, 2008
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ahumanbeing wrote:
Mar 21st, 2017 10:36 pm
This is only true if the outlet had one pair that was hooked up wrong, but not the other.
Yep...guess I could have gone into more detail on chances/odds and exactly what is wrong? It does happen that someone puts black with white(one pair wrong) and its always backstabbed receptacle when I see it.
nomdesplumes:

"I wonder if adding extra electrical outlets is considered an electrical installation?"
Member
Jan 4, 2014
411 posts
90 upvotes
Toronto
Zamboni wrote:
Mar 22nd, 2017 7:49 am
Yep...guess I could have gone into more detail on chances/odds and exactly what is wrong? It does happen that someone puts black with white(one pair wrong) and its always backstabbed receptacle when I see it.
Homeowners do some funny things when they do their own electrical.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
7057 posts
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Toronto
Lacklustre wrote:
Mar 21st, 2017 1:02 pm
Unfortunately it is going to be two dimmers and a switch. I presume I need a deep box for that. I am trying to avoid bumping out the wall if I can avoid ir
Boxes with ears, 2" deep with the mounting rail for them. Don't remember the p/n but they are at HD.
Deal Fanatic
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Jul 14, 2008
7481 posts
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Ontario
I have a question about powering on a wet/dry shop vac.

I'm currently reorganizing my garage, and the most convenient location to house the vacuum is not easily accessible (a shelf up top, for instance). The power switch is located on the main unit, so while all the hoses will be easy to grab, I'd need at least a stool to power it on.

However, if I plug this into a power bar a little lower, instead of direct to the outlet, is there any difference using the power bar switch to turn on the vacuum? (leaving the vacuum switch "ON" and using the powerbar to turn it on and off).

Also, on a related note, there is 1 plug (2 outlets) on the ceiling of my garage (garage door opener and shop LED light is connected to it). I'd like to add one of those drop/pull down plugs - easier to plug various power tools instead of cord being in the way (e.g., drill press, router). Are there any regs I need to be aware of attaching a power bar at this location? Still recommend keeping the garage opener directly connected? And practically, do you have a tip on how to easily grab the plug (high ceiling) - attach a string to pull down if it gets pulled up? Just add a stop? etc

Thanks
Sr. Member
May 9, 2003
725 posts
45 upvotes
Question about a new build in Ontario (2016-2017).

1) Is it code to require a GFCI and/or cover for an outdoor receptacle (ie: for a patio)

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