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Ask me anything about home electrical requirements, electrical code, wiring, devices

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  • Jul 20th, 2017 11:54 pm
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Member
User avatar
Mar 3, 2013
430 posts
225 upvotes
Newmarket
strikeraj wrote:
May 15th, 2017 3:32 pm
Hi
I need to do Elec-check on my rental property to get the municipal rental license. Is there a checklist somewhere so I can check to make sure things are alright before the inspector comes? The ESA website does not even post the requirement to get the certificate....
I don't want to spend $300 and fail on something stupid to spend $300 for a second check again.

Thanks
No there is no checklist because every home is different. The elec check inspector creates a deficiency list. Fix what's on the list and you pass.
A Licensed Electrical Contractor
Sr. Member
Dec 14, 2011
705 posts
183 upvotes
London
Thank you for your help!

We moved into a new home one year ago. Finishing part of my basement has been on my mind. I am typically a (knowledgeable) diy guy, but I am just not clear on something regarding the electrical. I looked on the ESA site but I am not sure. After I get the permit and run wiring, I need to get the rough in inspection. The site states that the wiring must be exposed (obviously).

The builder wood studded my walls, batt insulated and vapour barriered them floor to cieling. Therefore in order to run the outlet wires, I will need to get under the plastic and insulation.

For inspection, it is acceptable to just unfasten the bottom couple feet and pull up the insulation (temporarily tape it up folded higher against the wall) run my wire and then have it inspected or do I actually need to remove it all so the entire wall is exposed? I think my plan is ok, but don't want to fail the inspection and have to repeat it.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 23, 2008
3528 posts
1435 upvotes
Edmonton
Drakestar wrote:
May 16th, 2017 9:50 am
Thank you for your help!

We moved into a new home one year ago. Finishing part of my basement has been on my mind. I am typically a (knowledgeable) diy guy, but I am just not clear on something regarding the electrical. I looked on the ESA site but I am not sure. After I get the permit and run wiring, I need to get the rough in inspection. The site states that the wiring must be exposed (obviously).

The builder wood studded my walls, batt insulated and vapour barriered them floor to cieling. Therefore in order to run the outlet wires, I will need to get under the plastic and insulation.

For inspection, it is acceptable to just unfasten the bottom couple feet and pull up the insulation (temporarily tape it up folded higher against the wall) run my wire and then have it inspected or do I actually need to remove it all so the entire wall is exposed? I think my plan is ok, but don't want to fail the inspection and have to repeat it.
Here in Edmonton, I had to sit down with one of the electrical people to go over my plan and get my permit. I used that to get clarity on what the inspectors would need/want. I would say your plan is valid. They're going to be looking for things like supports for wire, no splices outside of junction boxes, etc.

C
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
7054 posts
498 upvotes
Toronto
Drakestar wrote:
May 16th, 2017 9:50 am
Thank you for your help!

We moved into a new home one year ago. Finishing part of my basement has been on my mind. I am typically a (knowledgeable) diy guy, but I am just not clear on something regarding the electrical. I looked on the ESA site but I am not sure. After I get the permit and run wiring, I need to get the rough in inspection. The site states that the wiring must be exposed (obviously).

The builder wood studded my walls, batt insulated and vapour barriered them floor to cieling. Therefore in order to run the outlet wires, I will need to get under the plastic and insulation.

For inspection, it is acceptable to just unfasten the bottom couple feet and pull up the insulation (temporarily tape it up folded higher against the wall) run my wire and then have it inspected or do I actually need to remove it all so the entire wall is exposed? I think my plan is ok, but don't want to fail the inspection and have to repeat it.
The first thing. Don't overthink it . Inspectors are pretty reasonable people if they see you trying to do conscientious work.
Member
Jan 14, 2012
204 posts
21 upvotes
KITCHENER
I forgot to ask this question when I was getting quotes for my wiring. Am I responsible for getting a permit from ESA and bringing ESA in to do an inspection, or is the individual(electrician) responsible for obtaining the permit and getting ESA to come in and inspect the job?

Also how would you guys pay, some money upfront, or all at end after inspection? Thank you.
Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
2262 posts
795 upvotes
Supperfly wrote:
May 28th, 2017 8:55 pm
I forgot to ask this question when I was getting quotes for my wiring. Am I responsible for getting a permit from ESA and bringing ESA in to do an inspection, or is the individual(electrician) responsible for obtaining the permit and getting ESA to come in and inspect the job?

Also how would you guys pay, some money upfront, or all at end after inspection? Thank you.
The Licensed Electrical Contractor you hire gets the permit.

https://www.esasafe.com/consumers/permi ... hire-a-lec
Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
2262 posts
795 upvotes
Supperfly wrote:
May 28th, 2017 9:01 pm
So basically he just goes here "https://www.esasafe.com/consumers/permi ... tion-forms" and obtains a permit from them. Thank you.
Punch in this contractors name/numbers and see if they are even registered as a Licensed Electrical Contractor with the ESA. If not than they cannot perform electrical work in your home.

https://findacontractor.esasafe.com/Hom ... ctorSearch
Member
Jan 14, 2012
204 posts
21 upvotes
KITCHENER
Also are they supposed to carry a card with their license #, etc. I looked up the license # i was provided with this quote, but when I put it in, it gives a different company name.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 6, 2002
4951 posts
4847 upvotes
Toronto
OK, physics/wiring/goofed-up question...

I went to replace the basement bathroom fan this weekend. Turn off the breaker. But then as I always do, double check with a proximity beeper. Surprise -- all the fixtures in the bathroom (fan, plug, lights) all chirp!

Play around a bit more, I figure out that I have to turn off the breaker for a completely different circuit (kitchen lighting) before the basement bathroom fixtures stop chirping! So a few questions questions:

1. Is it possible for adjoining wires from another circuit to induce anything in the bathroom circuit that is truly disconnected/properly wired? I think they may run parallel to each other in basement ceiling.

2. If that's not possible, I obviously messed up the wiring somehow. Is the explanation most likely a common neutral? (Note I did not directly test for voltage on the "disconnected" bathroom circuit.)

3. If it's messed up wiring, it probably won't be easy/possible to fix. Is there any danger to having a common neutral? Would a "solution" be to ensure both circuits are on opposite phases?

4. If I can't fix and there's no solution, what's the overload risk of a situation like this (presuming there's enough information to go by)

BTW both circuits were ESA "inspected" in different phases (kitchen reno, basement reno) but the inspector never actually looked at or tested those particular circuits.
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Jr. Member
Jul 2, 2013
155 posts
12 upvotes
Induced voltage is possible yes. Best to check with a multi meter.
Newbie
User avatar
Jul 18, 2007
63 posts
8 upvotes
London
What's the going rate for seasoned electricians?
Jr. Member
Apr 13, 2005
162 posts
14 upvotes
Looking to add an outlet above kitchen cabinets to power under cabinet light strips. Can I tie into the feed to the range hood thats hard wired? It would be simplest to wire.

Reading online.. I dont believe I can tie into the 3 20 amp outlets that already exist in the kitchen.. trust that is against code?

What alternatives are there if neither are to code? There is also a light that I could tie to.. just considering all options before a new line is required, which seems excessive to power LEDs?

Any feedback would be appreciated. Thank you!
[OP]
Deal Expert
User avatar
Oct 26, 2003
26594 posts
1626 upvotes
Winnipeg
rundmc2005 wrote:
Jun 6th, 2017 6:07 pm
Looking to add an outlet above kitchen cabinets to power under cabinet light strips. Can I tie into the feed to the range hood thats hard wired? It would be simplest to wire.

Reading online.. I dont believe I can tie into the 3 20 amp outlets that already exist in the kitchen.. trust that is against code?

What alternatives are there if neither are to code? There is also a light that I could tie to.. just considering all options before a new line is required, which seems excessive to power LEDs?

Any feedback would be appreciated. Thank you!
source from the range hood is fine, and it is against code for 20A breakers
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