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Mar 21, 2010
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Got a quote for Trane XR15i, 1.5 tonnes for $2700+hst, installed. House is new construction, 1820 sq ft, single detached, south facing.

Is the price reasonable? I've heard Trane makes one of the best AC units out there.

Still getting more quotes, but wanted to vet the first one.

Thanks.
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Dec 29, 2008
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tacowangtang wrote:
May 30th, 2011 1:34 pm
Got a quote for Trane XR15i, 1.5 tonnes for $2700+hst, installed. House is new construction, 1820 sq ft, single detached, south facing.

Is the price reasonable? I've heard Trane makes one of the best AC units out there.

Still getting more quotes, but wanted to vet the first one.

Thanks.

Go for a 2 ton we live in a 1930 sq ft so your not that much off and everyone i talked to said 2 ton including the builder. Trane owns American Standard or vise versa can't remember. Can't comment on the model vs price i'll leave that to the pros, but i'm getting a Amercian Standard Gold SI Allergance 13 for 2315 + HST which is the best quote i got.

@nighthawk26
Thanks i'm just gonna have the guy come and take a look, i think the extra yellow wire is for the AC since few neighbors had it installed by the builder and it was installed in the backyard which is where the wire is in the basement. But we are going to put it at the side as our backyard is kida small and don't need a 2 ton AC making it even smaller, that and to get revenge at my neighbors as they got a F***KING noisy Concord AC right next to my window and i can't sleep if the window is open which is why we are desperate for the AC. But then also scared that the noise will travel into the room when our AC is on thus the reason for going Gold.
Member
Jun 17, 2004
204 posts
22 upvotes
Burlington
I'm moving in to a 2500 square foot home in a couple of weeks. It's was built in 2001 and is quite well insulated and airtight. It has a high efficiency Keeprite Furnace.
Upon doing the inspection there were a couple of issues.

1. There is a Fresh Air Line drilled into the side of the house. Not an HRV, it's just a 4 inch line with a downward facing vent on the outside of the house. The fresh air line runs straight into the return air duct in the basement, which runs the length of the house then into the furnace. The inspector recommended that I close off this line or have an HRV. He said fresh cold air like that running into the furnace can cause condensation within the furnace. Is an HRV really necessary, or am I ok with just sealing off this line?

2. In the same return air duct in the basement, the previous owner cut a hole and put a makeshift 'register' directly in the return duct. The inspector noted that the furnace would probably pull more air from the basement into the furnace rather than properly recirculate return air from the rest of the house when something like this is done. Thoughts?

Any recommendations on these 2 issues?
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Jr. Member
Dec 29, 2003
198 posts
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Edmonton, AB
I have a 2100 sq-ft energy efficient home (Energuide 84) in Edmonton. The builder offered to install 2.5 tonnes, while all contractors are saying 3.5 tonnes "just in case". I think 2.5 tonnes is plenty because last summer, I was in the builder's showhome (same model house) and their central AC was short cycling on a 25*C day.

I am following the 1 ton per 1000 sq-ft rule (excluding basement). Can some of the experts confirm that 2.5 tonnes is sufficient for my need?

Thank you!
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Nov 21, 2009
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Ottawa
nighthawk26 wrote:
May 27th, 2011 1:17 am
I'm not sure what a VSX model is from Goodman, sorry. Main thing if you're going to buy a Goodman, RESEARCH the hell out of the dealer. All too often I see peopl eon here blowing their brains out comparing brands of AC units. You compare Goodman to Keeprite, and Lennox to Carrier (for example). More relevant woul dbe the dealer as the compared brands are in the same "class" to to speak. Check for Warranty... WHERE IT COMES FROM. To be Frank, all those prices are so close, NONE of that should be the deciding factor. Choose the rep you trusted the most with the company with the best history, referrals, whatever.
bririp wrote:
May 27th, 2011 6:20 am
The VSX isn't "goodman" per se. It is GMC, which is a new builder model, entry level unit. As Nighthawk said, for $200-$300, price shouldnt be your deciding factor. Go with the person you trust, check homestars, etc.

Actually, I have different advice: if you're going to buy Goodman, then sit back and wait for the next Spring: in my previous company, we sold a bunch of Goodmans one summer. Made good profit on the equipment because it was cheap. The next Spring, once the first heat wave hit (it was a freak early summer), we got service calls from practically EVERY Goodman we installed: they leaked the refrigerant out over the Winter because the service valves had leaked. This was a costly repair, as you had to replace the service valves with new ones (they never said if they were different ones) pump a vacuum in the lines (takes time), as well as supply new refrigerant. We never got the compensation we deserved, and have since then never sold a single Goodman.

Just sayin' :cheesygri
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Member
Apr 23, 2009
250 posts
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Toronto
donkeyman wrote:
May 31st, 2011 12:55 am
I have a 2100 sq-ft energy efficient home (Energuide 84) in Edmonton. The builder offered to install 2.5 tonnes, while all contractors are saying 3.5 tonnes "just in case". I think 2.5 tonnes is plenty because last summer, I was in the builder's showhome (same model house) and their central AC was short cycling on a 25*C day.

I am following the 1 ton per 1000 sq-ft rule (excluding basement). Can some of the experts confirm that 2.5 tonnes is sufficient for my need?

Thank you!

If your air duct size is big enough for a 3 ton unit, get it. A 3 tonnes AC require 1050cfm to 1200cfm of air supply to the A coil to proper dehumidify and prevent ice build up. I read that it is 350 to 400 CFM per tonne. My house is 2600sq feet with open center hall to the ceiling. The existing duct work is good for 2.5tonnes, the blower can pull around 1000cfm. I replaced my two tonnes with a three tonnes unit. Works great. My old one can only keep the temperature at 23C on a hot humid day or with a lot of people in the house on a hot day. The 3 tonne can hold the temperature at 21C.

By the way, everybody was telling me don't use a 3 tonne it will cycle on and off and don't dehumidify the house properly. I don't find it like that, it will stay on for hours during the day before it shuts down in the evening. My house is nice dry and cool.
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Nov 21, 2009
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pax1234 wrote:
May 31st, 2011 9:23 am
If your air duct size is big enough for a 3 ton unit, get it. A 3 tonnes AC require 1050cfm to 1200cfm of air supply to the A coil to proper dehumidify and prevent ice build up. I read that it is 350 to 400 CFM per tonne. My house is 2600sq feet with open center hall to the ceiling. The existing duct work is good for 2.5tonnes, the blower can pull around 1000cfm. I replaced my two tonnes with a three tonnes unit. Works great. My old one can only keep the temperature at 23C on a hot humid day or with a lot of people in the house on a hot day. The 3 tonne can hold the temperature at 21C.

By the way, everybody was telling me don't use a 3 tonne it will cycle on and off and don't dehumidify the house properly. I don't find it like that, it will stay on for hours during the day before it shuts down in the evening. My house is nice dry and cool.

Real simple: have a certified heat gain calculation done. You don't go by square feet per ton - it's just a shoot-from-the hip method! If the heat gain isn't done, then I go by square feet of above-grade living space: older homes 800 ft2/ton, R2000 homes 1,000 ft2/ton. But that is still a shoot-from-the-hip approach. If your kid was sick or your car was defective, wouldn't you want the correct way done?
Make sure your heat gain calculation includes window shading, ventilation and air leakage!!!
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Jr. Member
Dec 29, 2003
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Edmonton, AB
pax1234 wrote:
May 31st, 2011 9:23 am
If your air duct size is big enough for a 3 ton unit, get it. A 3 tonnes AC require 1050cfm to 1200cfm of air supply to the A coil to proper dehumidify and prevent ice build up. I read that it is 350 to 400 CFM per tonne. My house is 2600sq feet with open center hall to the ceiling. The existing duct work is good for 2.5tonnes, the blower can pull around 1000cfm. I replaced my two tonnes with a three tonnes unit. Works great. My old one can only keep the temperature at 23C on a hot humid day or with a lot of people in the house on a hot day. The 3 tonne can hold the temperature at 21C.

By the way, everybody was telling me don't use a 3 tonne it will cycle on and off and don't dehumidify the house properly. I don't find it like that, it will stay on for hours during the day before it shuts down in the evening. My house is nice dry and cool.

Thanks for the reply. I see that you are in Ontario which is where most people in this thread are. Here is what one of my installers said about Ontario versus Alberta when I e-mailed him. Is this true?

"It's always a good idea to get other opinions on sizing, however I would suggest you go with a 3 1/2 ton unit. We don't have the humidity for a smaller unit to have to run continuously to eliminate it, the smaller unit practise is more common in ontario, but I will leave the decision up to you. I will strongly recommend you don't go less than 3 ton."
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Dec 29, 2003
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Edmonton, AB
Limoges_shopper wrote:
May 31st, 2011 11:24 am
Real simple: have a certified heat gain calculation done. You don't go by square feet per ton - it's just a shoot-from-the hip method! If the heat gain isn't done, then I go by square feet of above-grade living space: older homes 800 ft2/ton, R2000 homes 1,000 ft2/ton. But that is still a shoot-from-the-hip approach. If your kid was sick or your car was defective, wouldn't you want the correct way done?
Make sure your heat gain calculation includes window shading, ventilation and air leakage!!!

Thanks, I may have the heat gain calculation results in my EnerGuide report which I will dig up tonight. I think I may be able to do the math from there using the ARI 210/240 standard.
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Apr 23, 2009
250 posts
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Toronto
donkeyman wrote:
May 31st, 2011 11:33 am
Thanks, I may have the heat gain calculation results in my EnerGuide report which I will dig up tonight. I think I may be able to do the math from there using the ARI 210/240 standard.

Well, if you don't have the humidity level like we have here in Ontario, a bigger capacity AC would be nice to have, if your duct work can support the extra air flow.

Here in Ontario, like to-day, the forcast is 31C, but with humidity, it is feeling like 41C. So if the Air conditioner going to cycle on and off, the bigger capacity of the AC don't stay on long enough to remove the mositure in the air. The temperature may be low, but it is not comfortable.
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Apr 13, 2006
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hi,

sorry if this has already been asked in this thread
we recently had a Maytag AC installed...and it doesn't seem to be cutting it. the only level that is cool is the basement...the main floor and upper floors won't lower even a single degree!

it's in my nature to try and solve things and i'd like to go through some process of elimination to determine what may be causing this but i don't know where to start...in other words:

1) i can see the AC is running outside, but how can i tell if it's "really" working? - there is condensation buildup on the furnace where the coil was installed... (sorry if i have the terms wrong) so does that mean the AC is doing its job?
2) what steps can i take to see if the AC is "good enough"? (it's 2.5 ton for a ~2200sqft home unfinished basement) .. should the duct work all be "cool" to touch? or just room temperature? or this doesn't help?
3) what steps can i take to see if the furnace is "good enough"? new build home so the furnace isn't old...but perhaps it's not configured correctly (can that happen?)
4) what steps can i take to see if the duct work is proper? - when the fan is on i can feel air blowing through all the vents...it's not a powerful amount of air mind you but i think it's ok? but how does one measure this?

anything else? it's getting hotter and hotter and it just sucks that we spent all this money on a new AC and it doesn't seem to be cutting it =\
thanks for the help/tips/guidance!
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Dec 17, 2008
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Ontario
ipxxx wrote:
May 31st, 2011 7:14 pm
hi,

sorry if this has already been asked in this thread
we recently had a Maytag AC installed...and it doesn't seem to be cutting it. the only level that is cool is the basement...the main floor and upper floors won't lower even a single degree!

it's in my nature to try and solve things and i'd like to go through some process of elimination to determine what may be causing this but i don't know where to start...in other words:

1) i can see the AC is running outside, but how can i tell if it's "really" working? - there is condensation buildup on the furnace where the coil was installed... (sorry if i have the terms wrong) so does that mean the AC is doing its job?
2) what steps can i take to see if the AC is "good enough"? (it's 2.5 ton for a ~2200sqft home unfinished basement) .. should the duct work all be "cool" to touch? or just room temperature? or this doesn't help?
3) what steps can i take to see if the furnace is "good enough"? new build home so the furnace isn't old...but perhaps it's not configured correctly (can that happen?)
4) what steps can i take to see if the duct work is proper? - when the fan is on i can feel air blowing through all the vents...it's not a powerful amount of air mind you but i think it's ok? but how does one measure this?

anything else? it's getting hotter and hotter and it just sucks that we spent all this money on a new AC and it doesn't seem to be cutting it =\
thanks for the help/tips/guidance!

could be the coil freezing up, because of low airflow or incorrect charge, why don't you just call the installers back and let them fix their mistakes?
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Sep 5, 2002
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Limoges_shopper -

Thanks for all the good info throughout this thread.
[OP]
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Dec 27, 2007
1074 posts
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Markham
pax1234 wrote:
May 31st, 2011 12:39 pm
Well, if you don't have the humidity level like we have here in Ontario, a bigger capacity AC would be nice to have, if your duct work can support the extra air flow.

Here in Ontario, like to-day, the forcast is 31C, but with humidity, it is feeling like 41C. So if the Air conditioner going to cycle on and off, the bigger capacity of the AC don't stay on long enough to remove the mositure in the air. The temperature may be low, but it is not comfortable.


The ideal solution now days is to purchase a two stage unit. If on the highest load days you need a 3-ton, it will operate at approximately 50% capacity on first stage and 100% on second...best of both worlds!
Providing Customers with the highest quality Home Comfort Products, and service! http://www.homestars.com/companies/2781 ... ly-med-air
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JohnB wrote:
May 31st, 2011 11:19 pm
Limoges_shopper -

Thanks for all the good info throughout this thread.

You're welcome, and thank you for your kind words. :)
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