Home & Garden

Ask me anything about HVAC heating air conditioning air quality control

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 16th, 2019 6:13 pm
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 24, 2005
2127 posts
2650 upvotes
Toronto
Possum77 wrote:
Jun 10th, 2011 6:52 pm
don't do it unless it's been renovated recently or it hasn't been done in 40 yrs.

We just bought the home and we're going to be doing renovations: specifically sanding and staining a lot of the flooring, putting in new flooring in other parts, kitchen ceramic & cabinets, bathroom work, etc. I guess in that case I should do the duct cleaning after the renovations are done.

Why do you say not to do it if it hasn't been done in 40 years? Can you elaborate please?
Nothing to see here folks...
Member
May 6, 2010
493 posts
31 upvotes
Richmond Hill
loonieryan wrote:
Jun 10th, 2011 7:27 pm
We just bought the home and we're going to be doing renovations: specifically sanding and staining a lot of the flooring, putting in new flooring in other parts, kitchen ceramic & cabinets, bathroom work, etc. I guess in that case I should do the duct cleaning after the renovations are done.

Why do you say not to do it if it hasn't been done in 40 years? Can you elaborate please?

Well, i've seen ducts with so much gunk it's unreal (during possible purchase home inspection). Not too sure if conventional blowing would clean it too.
I had "cheap" duct cleaning once and it didn't do much. If you are not running system during reno I would just leave it if registers are sealed.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 21, 2009
1815 posts
304 upvotes
Ottawa
loonieryan wrote:
Jun 10th, 2011 7:27 pm
We just bought the home and we're going to be doing renovations: specifically sanding and staining a lot of the flooring, putting in new flooring in other parts, kitchen ceramic & cabinets, bathroom work, etc. I guess in that case I should do the duct cleaning after the renovations are done.

Why do you say not to do it if it hasn't been done in 40 years? Can you elaborate please?
Possum77 wrote:
Jun 10th, 2011 8:09 pm
Well, i've seen ducts with so much gunk it's unreal (during possible purchase home inspection). Not too sure if conventional blowing would clean it too.
I had "cheap" duct cleaning once and it didn't do much. If you are not running system during reno I would just leave it if registers are sealed.

Get it done by a recognized duct cleaning company. Some HVAC companies have duct cleaning as part of their repertoire, and a few of them actually do it properly, and will include furnace cleaning as part of the package: IF they do it right, it would be advantageous to have them do a clean and check on the furnace at the same time.

Ask the right questions too:
  1. How long have you been in business?
  2. What kind of equipment do you use?
  3. Do you have a camera that can show us before & after ducts
  4. How many crews do you have?
  5. Do you use any kind of chemicals during the process?
  6. Do you have MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet) on any chemicals ?(and chemicals mean ANYTHING - even organic whatever is comprised of chemicals)
  7. Are you a member of the Better Business Bureau?
  8. After they quote you the price: "Do you offer Senior's Discount?" <---- Time for the in-laws to spend the afternoon at your place, and earn their keep! hehe!
Good luck!
If you like my post, please upvote! :)
Putting people and solutions together since 1995
Need quick advice? Email me at RFDfanOttawa@gmail.com
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 21, 2009
1815 posts
304 upvotes
Ottawa
Possum77 wrote:
Jun 10th, 2011 6:52 pm
don't do it unless it's been renovated recently or it hasn't been done in 40 yrs.

Possum77: I just don't think that is good advice. Do you really want to be breathing in the previous homeowner's crap? I say this: New home, clean slate, fresh start: then you know what's inside your ducts, and there are no surprises.

40 years? Where did that figure come from?
If you like my post, please upvote! :)
Putting people and solutions together since 1995
Need quick advice? Email me at RFDfanOttawa@gmail.com
Deal Addict
May 9, 2006
1413 posts
133 upvotes
Hi all,

I'm wondering if all 3M furnace filter restricts air flow? I've been using 3M furnace filter since last year (300 MPR), and according to the label it is used for 'High Air Flow'.

There are some leaks coming from my furnace. According to my AC installer, the indoor coil froze and this happens when the air flow is too low over the coil. He asked me to check my furnace filter to make sure it is not dirty. Also please make sure I do not have a 3m high restriction filter in there.

If that is the case, which furnace filter should I use? Thanks.
Deal Addict
Dec 8, 2009
1208 posts
64 upvotes
The 3M filtrete filters can be restrictive. I did a quick google on 300mpr and if what I saw is what you have they are restrictive.
Usually there's a reason a company is "cheap". Value and cheap are different. Value means best product/service for the dollar spent. Cheap is just that. Cheap.
Member
Sep 26, 2008
478 posts
97 upvotes
Ottawa
Hi there,

I recently had a 2 ton A/C unit installed. When first using it a couple of weeks ago, I noticed that when it is running, there is a loud hissing noise coming from inside the main duct where the A/C pipes are connected. The hissing noise is constant when the unit is running. I got in touch with my installer and he said it was normal and has to do with a valve (or rather, lack thereof). The unit seems to be working fine in terms of cooling - the few times it was on, anyway.

Previous units that I've owned did not make this hissing sound, but they used the older refrigerant. Is it normal to have this hissing noise with r410a units?

Thanks in advance.
Deal Addict
Jan 16, 2003
1256 posts
93 upvotes
Toronto
I live in a condo and each unit has its own valve for air conditioning. It was warm last week so I tried to turn the AC on and it wouldn't. The service person recommended by the condo property manager came in yesterday and fiddled with the valve for about an hour trying to get the pressures at the right levels. He tried it 4 times and in the end said I need a new valve. He talked to his manager and I was given a $1100 quote for part and labour. Is this reasonable?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 21, 2009
1815 posts
304 upvotes
Ottawa
springroll wrote:
Jun 14th, 2011 11:23 am
I live in a condo and each unit has its own valve for air conditioning. It was warm last week so I tried to turn the AC on and it wouldn't. The service person recommended by the condo property manager came in yesterday and fiddled with the valve for about an hour trying to get the pressures at the right levels. He tried it 4 times and in the end said I need a new valve. He talked to his manager and I was given a $1100 quote for part and labour. Is this reasonable?

No - get another quote - it seems high for just that. If you get a better price (written proposal, not an ESTIMATE), then tell your property manager the price difference (especially if it's huge), and then go with the cheaper guy anyway. I don't know what kind of system you have, but it sounds like you have a heat pump with a common water supply that is cooled by a central chiller. The reason I mention this is because you have mentioned a valve, and the position of said valve affecting whether heating or cooling is achieved.
Bottom line: eleven hundred bucks to replace a valve is steep. I'd want serious justification for that. Also, next time you post about a problem like this, back it up with manufacturer, make and model, etc... This way we can determine if what you are talking about is in fact what we guess it is, and we can actually figure out what valve it is that you need, research the cost for said item, and let you know if in fact you're being taken to the cleaners or if you do in fact have an eleven hundred dollar (plus 13% HST - Thank you Mr. McGuinty. See your sorry ass next election!) problem. :)
If you like my post, please upvote! :)
Putting people and solutions together since 1995
Need quick advice? Email me at RFDfanOttawa@gmail.com
Deal Addict
Jan 16, 2003
1256 posts
93 upvotes
Toronto
Thanks for the follow up, it's much appreciated. My understsanding is that is due to the size of the unit and the positioning of the valve, there's a bit of work to actually replace the valve hence the price.
When I was given the proposal (not written, just verbal), I immediately stated that it sounded a tad high and I'll need to think about it.
Yes, I believe based on what the guy described to me, there's a heat pump with a common water supply that is cooled by a central chiller.
I didn't get a chance to read through the 100+ pages within the thread, are there professionals monitoring this thread that could possibly help out with my situation? If so, I'd be happy to enquire more to gather information on the manufacturer, model...etc.

Thanks again.
Limoges_shopper wrote:
Jun 14th, 2011 1:44 pm
No - get another quote - it seems high for just that. If you get a better price (written proposal, not an ESTIMATE), then tell your property manager the price difference (especially if it's huge), and then go with the cheaper guy anyway. I don't know what kind of system you have, but it sounds like you have a heat pump with a common water supply that is cooled by a central chiller. The reason I mention this is because you have mentioned a valve, and the position of said valve affecting whether heating or cooling is achieved.
Bottom line: eleven hundred bucks to replace a valve is steep. I'd want serious justification for that. Also, next time you post about a problem like this, back it up with manufacturer, make and model, etc... This way we can determine if what you are talking about is in fact what we guess it is, and we can actually figure out what valve it is that you need, research the cost for said item, and let you know if in fact you're being taken to the cleaners or if you do in fact have an eleven hundred dollar (plus 13% HST - Thank you Mr. McGuinty. See your sorry ass next election!) problem. :)
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 21, 2009
1815 posts
304 upvotes
Ottawa
springroll wrote:
Jun 14th, 2011 3:13 pm
Thanks for the follow up, it's much appreciated. My understsanding is that is due to the size of the unit and the positioning of the valve, there's a bit of work to actually replace the valve hence the price.
When I was given the proposal (not written, just verbal), I immediately stated that it sounded a tad high and I'll need to think about it.
Yes, I believe based on what the guy described to me, there's a heat pump with a common water supply that is cooled by a central chiller.
I didn't get a chance to read through the 100+ pages within the thread, are there professionals monitoring this thread that could possibly help out with my situation? If so, I'd be happy to enquire more to gather information on the manufacturer, model...etc.

Thanks again.
All "monitoring" is done on a volunteer basis only. You should get the manufacturer of the unit as well as the manufacturer or the valve (if you can see it). Only then can anyone begin to help you. Once we have that information, then we can check to see if your quote is fair or not.
If you like my post, please upvote! :)
Putting people and solutions together since 1995
Need quick advice? Email me at RFDfanOttawa@gmail.com
Member
Sep 26, 2008
478 posts
97 upvotes
Ottawa
Jenny1975 wrote:
Jun 14th, 2011 9:03 am
I recently had a 2 ton A/C unit installed. When first using it a couple of weeks ago, I noticed that when it is running, there is a loud hissing noise coming from inside the main duct where the A/C pipes are connected. The hissing noise is constant when the unit is running. I got in touch with my installer and he said it was normal and has to do with a valve (or rather, lack thereof). The unit seems to be working fine in terms of cooling - the few times it was on, anyway.

Previous units that I've owned did not make this hissing sound, but they used the older refrigerant. Is it normal to have this hissing noise with r410a units?

Thanks in advance.
Any insights into this? Input would be appreciated.
Deal Addict
Dec 15, 2006
1867 posts
148 upvotes
Jenny1975 wrote:
Jun 16th, 2011 7:18 am
Any insights into this? Input would be appreciated.

The advice from anyone should be obvious. Call your installing company! You paid for the unit and it's install, you shouldn't have to be wasting time on a consumer website asking about it's operation which to answer your question directly does not sound normal.

Top