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Ask me anything about HVAC heating air conditioning air quality control

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Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 31, 2001
7631 posts
305 upvotes
Toronto
Are the Sharp Plasmathingys ones any good for air cleaning?
[OP]
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2007
1059 posts
109 upvotes
Markham
consumerPI wrote:
Feb 4th, 2008 10:39 pm
Are the Sharp Plasmathingys ones any good for air cleaning?
the sharp units are great as long as you follow the directions for room size. If it says 100 sq ft, chances are it is good for 80 sq ft.

They are a good, fairly cheap, unit, but if you are planning on doing several rooms, then you are better to get a central unit.
Member
User avatar
Sep 16, 2007
218 posts
6 upvotes
Ottawarse
bririp wrote:
Jan 31st, 2008 5:53 pm
you don't want to just randomly connect anything. I am not sure what your set-up looks like by your description. Is there anyway you can take a picture and post it here so I can see, maybe I can be of further help then.
Image

Image

The hose from the outside is just hanging there. Not plumbed into anything. Subsequently, there's a serious draft from the furnace room.
Member
Oct 12, 2006
266 posts
8 upvotes
Markham
fooit wrote:
Feb 4th, 2008 5:51 pm
I installed Swordfish UV light from Home Depot.

How good/bad is it compared to other UV lights?

Now that I have this UV to kill bacteria, what would be a good choice filter for me that would allow better airflow than that expensive 3M filter?
Just to clarify....the UV DOES NOT KILL ANYTHING....what is does is make any bacteria that is present in the water sterile so it will not reproduce in your body.

Cheers
Jr. Member
Dec 22, 2006
141 posts
2 upvotes
GTA
Can you recommend a particular brand/model of central humidifier?
I would like install one but I'm concerned about spreading bacterias in moisture. Do they have any antibacterial built-in support nowadays?

Thanks,
Deal Addict
Mar 25, 2005
1136 posts
17 upvotes
Tical, that hose is for combustion air. leave it as is, you dont need to do anything to it.

we had one too before we replaced the furnace.
Deal Addict
Jan 4, 2007
1342 posts
14 upvotes
pkguy wrote:
Feb 2nd, 2008 8:22 pm
If you're emptying all that water each and everyday you have backup pressure problems or a stuck water intake valve. When you're not getting heat to the upstairs it usually means their is air in the system stopping the hot water etc etc etc... With any hot water heating system (it's referred to as a hydronic heating system) you MUST perform at least one annual system check to remove air from the pipes etc. So many people who inherit these things haven't got a clue.
I strongly strongly suggest you call in a knowledgable heating contractor who is well versed in these. He can take a look at it.. bleed the air out.. check the valves and save you a ton of grief if you try and do it yourself the first time loosening all those stuck valves which won't close properly when you go to close them and therefore drip or leak water leaving you scrambling.

And while he's there stay with him and have him explain how the whole system works because you should know the basics. I was in a similar boat as you a few years ago and that's what I did. Now everything works great.
I had him install an automatic airbleeding valve on the pipe down near the boiler and that saves having to remove the air manually from each radiator or baseboard as often.
It'll be money well spent
Excellent advise, my only addition would be that the problem is most like with your overflow tank not the rads themselves. The overflow tank must have some water in it but not be full. (100 year old 2 story with asbestos clad pipes).
Deal Addict
User avatar
Feb 1, 2008
2439 posts
180 upvotes
Niagara Falls, ON
Anyone have any experience with this? I can't afford to pay upfront for one so I was thinking about getting this from direct energy. Must be better than my 1" media, Right?
Newbie
Jun 21, 2007
52 posts
2 upvotes
Hi Brian,

I'm finishing my basement this spring and want to seal my ductwork joints as they are really leaky.

Most ducts are running in the floor joist cavities and space is limited. I've taped as many areas as the space allows but still have many leaky areas. I was thinking of using mastic to seal the joints before I drywall as I could get a paint brush in to some of the tighter areas. Do you have any thoughts and were can I buy the stuff. The big box stores don't sell it.

Thanks for your help.

Scott.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2007
1059 posts
109 upvotes
Markham
foam wrote:
Feb 8th, 2008 11:55 am
Hi Brian,

I'm finishing my basement this spring and want to seal my ductwork joints as they are really leaky.

Most ducts are running in the floor joist cavities and space is limited. I've taped as many areas as the space allows but still have many leaky areas. I was thinking of using mastic to seal the joints before I drywall as I could get a paint brush in to some of the tighter areas. Do you have any thoughts and were can I buy the stuff. The big box stores don't sell it.

Thanks for your help.

Scott.
There is a place in Richmond hill on leslie and 16th ave called Trent Metals. They sell that stuff there.

Now before you go throwing this stuff on, you should look at getting someone to make sure the duct is all put together properly. Most of the guys who do "new home" construction are paid by the house, so they want to get in and out asap. This leads to large gaps. What should happen is the duct shouldn't need any tape or sealant to be sealed.

I would take a look at that first before coating.
Newbie
Jun 21, 2007
52 posts
2 upvotes
bririp wrote:
Feb 8th, 2008 1:09 pm
There is a place in Richmond hill on leslie and 16th ave called Trent Metals. They sell that stuff there.

Now before you go throwing this stuff on, you should look at getting someone to make sure the duct is all put together properly. Most of the guys who do "new home" construction are paid by the house, so they want to get in and out asap. This leads to large gaps. What should happen is the duct shouldn't need any tape or sealant to be sealed.

I would take a look at that first before coating.
Thats great, I travel up to that area on business quite a bit.

I did have a local contractor in to look at moving some ductwork for me (he can't) and did say the work was sloppy, and mastic would be a good solution.

You've been around the block so to speak, I didn't mention that I live in a new house (6 years old). It's a shame that the quality of workmanship has dropped off so much with new home construction.
Newbie
Oct 3, 2007
29 posts
3 upvotes
mississauga
Hi, I have a question about insulating ducting.

I have a 35 year old house with what I believe is original ducting. For the main duct (16"x8") do you believe that there is any value in wraping it with insulation? Or would there be more value in just using a product to seal the joints?

Cheers
[OP]
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2007
1059 posts
109 upvotes
Markham
Insulating is a very hard thing to do...it is messy and hard work to do it neatly. It is also quite expensive.

However it is well worth the time and investment!
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