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Ask me anything about HVAC heating air conditioning air quality control

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  • Sep 19th, 2017 5:58 pm
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Deal Addict
Dec 15, 2006
1866 posts
138 upvotes
Kevlar92 wrote:
Jun 12th, 2017 10:59 pm
Is a York YCE 1.5 ton enough for a 1400 sq bungalow? Also any thoughts on a York TM9V? Thinking of going with carrier instead as it's ~$600 more
Likely a 2 ton is more appropriate, and a 60k furnace. What are are you located in?
Newbie
Nov 9, 2006
3 posts
This is a great thread. Hoping you can lead me in the right direction on what size AC unit I should get.

I live in 1.5 story home in Scarborough. The house was built approx in mid 50s. It was renovated approximately 20 years ago, it's hard to tell how if the house is well insulated. I currently have a Keep Rite 1.5 ton AC unit manufactured in 2000 that came with the house when I purchased it in 2008. I replaced our older furnace in 2011 with an 60k BTU variable speed American Standard one and looking to pair it with an American Standard Silver 14 or Silver 16 SEER AC unit.

1. Square footage (excluding basement) - approx 1200-1300 sq ft (excluding finished basement) . Main floor has 4 supply and 2 returns, second floor has 4 supply and 4 returns, basement has 4 supply and 1 return
2. Ceiling height - main level and upstairs - Main 8ft, Upstairs 7.5ft
3. House - faces south, towards Lake Ontario
4. Size and number of large windows: 1 large window at the front (south side, approximately 4.5ft x 7.5ft), 3 medium sized windows at the back (north side, 2 facing the back (approx 3ft x 4ft) and 1 on west side of house 3ft x4ft)


All windows are energy efficient except the basement windows (3)

I turned on the AC yesterday, the inside of the house was 26, but it was not cooling down the house. It was blowing coolish air, but not cold. After running the AC for 13 hours, it only go to 24.5 at midnight and I ended up turning it off.

I've gotten several quotes and some contractors are suggesting to go with a 2 ton 14 SEER unit, some are saying to stick with the same size (1.5 ton). The ones that are saying to go with 2 ton say it's appropriate for my size home and there's not much price difference between 2 ton and 1.5 ton. I've read an oversized unit may not be necessarily a good thing because it will short cycle, it'll cool down the house fast, but won't run long enough to dehumidify the house leaving it cold and clammy. Getting an undersized unit will run the unit for a long period of time until it reaches the desired temperature, which would drive my hydro bill up.

Given the details I've provided, what size unit would you recommend? and does 0.5 of a difference in tonnage make a significant difference? will the current ductwork be able to accommodate a 2 ton unit?

Looking forward to your input.

Thanks!
Last edited by gzarzos on Jun 13th, 2017 10:12 pm, edited 3 times in total.
Deal Addict
Feb 4, 2015
2387 posts
387 upvotes
nater51 wrote:
Jun 13th, 2017 8:50 pm
Sorry I typed that all wrong. A high efficiency furnace is supposed to be around I think 5 or 6 cycles (10 minutes on 10 minutes off) The idea is to bring the house to an even temp using the least amount of power. If your furnace runs 2 cycles in an hour (30 minutes on 30 minutes off) it might mean the furnace is having trouble cooling or heating as effectively as before (if it's high efficiency). I got the numbers wrong and the direction, ideally you don't want the furnace running non-stop for a long period if you can avoid it. But in your case if it was a really hot day and it was the first time being used then less cycles is to be expected (furnace runs longer to cool down the house). You should be concerned if it's 25 Celsius outside and your furnace runs for 60 minutes straight to get to lets say 23 or 24 Celsius inside your house.

But the temperature readings you were getting out of the vent sound normal.

Sorry for the confusion of my last post.
No expert here however wouldn't longer cycles be more efficient [start off low then high if needed then low as reach temp set]?

10 min cycles would be less efficient as by the time temps getting hot/cold the furnace/ac shuts off.

I'll let more knowledgeable folks correct as needed.
Deal Addict
Feb 4, 2015
2387 posts
387 upvotes
pootza wrote:
Jun 13th, 2017 11:31 am
In the 'auto' mode the fan runs on a call for heat or cool and at the speed set for either. In the 'on' mode the fan will run continuous at the fan speed set for the cool mode (usually high).
Some people use the 'on' mode to circulate the air about the house. Some also use a continuous low speed and when the call for heat/cool the fan bumps up to the speed for them.
'Better' is just what you find more comfortable for you.
Gonna try the 24/7 fan this summer and see hopefully added comfort with little cost... Hydro One site has the details.

Our tstat actually allows to set 6 different fan speeds [we set at 585 cfm low med] and then when call for AC it goes to 1000 cfm. Can set in tstat settings the particular AC you have [communicating or not, one stage or two, ton]. We set at 2.5 ton even though 3.0 ton as that gives 1000 cfm vs 1200 cfm; would rather have smoother slightly longer cycles. Tstat also lets us set a relative humidity % we would like to reach and how long fan stops [even if on continuous] after a call for AC ends so can have drain time. We don't use the humidity setting but have set for 10 mins drain time [no fan].

Hopefully our many settings tstat does not overwhelm old builder grade AC!!
Newbie
Sep 1, 2012
93 posts
9 upvotes
Ottawa/Gatineau
shoppingkart wrote:
Jun 13th, 2017 8:45 pm
It depends which vents you are measuring. Find the vent which is closest to the furnace and check temperature there. The further you go from furnace higher the temperature will be, and it's the opposite in heating season.
I will try that.

Here is my test from yesterday:
At 3:45, it was 27C in the house and I set the thermostat to 25.5C.

3:45 - 27
4:15 - 26.5
6:00 - 26
6:45 - 25.5

It took 3h to bring the temperature down by 1.5 C.. and it was not even that warm outside. I think the outside temp was 26-27C.

Do you think it's normal?
Jr. Member
Nov 26, 2006
112 posts
2 upvotes
Hi - I had a new AC installed last year (3.5 ton, 16 seer, American Standard). When I first got it installed, the installer didn't have enough refrigerant, so had to come back the next day to add.

Everything seemed ok last year, but when I started it this year, I noticed it was not cooling the house well. What happens is the AC turns on, starts to cool, inside temp starts to go down slowly (from 26-25), but then goes back up to 26 and doesn't go down. The AC is still running (and has been for a while), but I noticed the air from the vents is not as cool as when it first started, and there isn't much air coming out. This happened to me 2 nights in a row, and fearing a malfunction, I turned off the AC. Just wanted to get some thoughts on what this could be. Thanks in advance.
Newbie
Sep 16, 2013
80 posts
15 upvotes
SW ON
Which brand of AC/furnace is considered overall most reliable these days? I know that there are many brands but only a few manufacturers. I am mostly interested in single stage AC/furnace, not very efficient ones.
Deal Fanatic
Feb 9, 2006
7453 posts
1559 upvotes
Brampton
MIT wrote:
Jun 14th, 2017 11:23 am
Hi - I had a new AC installed last year (3.5 ton, 16 seer, American Standard). When I first got it installed, the installer didn't have enough refrigerant, so had to come back the next day to add.

Everything seemed ok last year, but when I started it this year, I noticed it was not cooling the house well. What happens is the AC turns on, starts to cool, inside temp starts to go down slowly (from 26-25), but then goes back up to 26 and doesn't go down. The AC is still running (and has been for a while), but I noticed the air from the vents is not as cool as when it first started, and there isn't much air coming out. This happened to me 2 nights in a row, and fearing a malfunction, I turned off the AC. Just wanted to get some thoughts on what this could be. Thanks in advance.
Could be a number of things .
Too much refrigerant thus it trips an overload
Not enough and your coils are frozen.
The capacitor on you compressor is going. The start capacitor works and it runs for abit but the run side is weak so as pressure builds and you need more power it fails. For this you listen to the flow of refrigerant or pull the capacitor out and test capacitance. Careful not to zap yourself.

Sounds most likely tho the coil frozen. Due to your low airflow comment. Call a tech to look at it.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 17, 2008
1451 posts
261 upvotes
Ontario
stefxx wrote:
Jun 14th, 2017 9:13 am
I will try that.

Here is my test from yesterday:
At 3:45, it was 27C in the house and I set the thermostat to 25.5C.

3:45 - 27
4:15 - 26.5
6:00 - 26
6:45 - 25.5

It took 3h to bring the temperature down by 1.5 C.. and it was not even that warm outside. I think the outside temp was 26-27C.

Do you think it's normal?
Many factors to consider when it comes to heating or cooling your house....your readings look reasonable to me...there is a big difference between cooling down a house or maintaining a set temperature...as long as the AC can maintain your set temperature I wouldn't worry about it.
Newbie
May 31, 2017
16 posts
1 upvote
Hopefully this is the right place to ask this question ..

We moved our dryer to the other side of the house so it has brand new ducts etc. The contractor installed a flexible "insulated dryer pipe" in the section that is within the wall, leading to the vent outside.

Does that meet code, or does it need to be a rigid metal duct?

Thanks in advance!
Deal Addict
May 18, 2009
1989 posts
216 upvotes
Anyone here have decent experience with HRVs and ecobee3? I hooked my ecobee 3 up using the PEK since I don't have a c-wire. Any time my HRV turns on, it blows the 3a fuse in the furnace.

It's interlocked. I can certainly provide more details if anyone is able to advise.

Thanks.
Newbie
Jun 17, 2017
2 posts
Bought my home about 4 years ago and was curious about the best way to go about insulating it. As the house has a cold zone in the living room/kitchen.

Was built in '59 and the walls are brick on the outside then concrete, then brick. It was built when oil to heat a home was so cheap.

I have a bungalow house and it's already small enough so putting up two by fours then insulating it is an option but I'll lose square footage.

Any ideas??
Newbie
Apr 15, 2014
93 posts
42 upvotes
Woodbridge, ON
Hi

So I have a generalaire humidifier. (1042) Now when I turn it on its fine. However as soon as i set the setting to 50 or above there's a constant hissing noise that starts. Doesn't look like a leak the hissing noise seems to be coming from inside the unit. Is this normal or should I get it checked out by a professional.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
13185 posts
3207 upvotes
Da13id wrote:
Jun 18th, 2017 1:16 am
Bought my home about 4 years ago and was curious about the best way to go about insulating it. As the house has a cold zone in the living room/kitchen.

Was built in '59 and the walls are brick on the outside then concrete, then brick. It was built when oil to heat a home was so cheap.

I have a bungalow house and it's already small enough so putting up two by fours then insulating it is an option but I'll lose square footage.

Any ideas??
Insulate on the exterior, rigid foam then stucco would work quite well.
I recommend you look into someone who has experience doing this, i don't mean a contractor, that should be who you look into last, and there are some energy saving rebates available, they will only cover a fraction of the cost but its free money.
Lies, damned lies, statistics and alternative facts
Newbie
User avatar
May 24, 2009
15 posts
1 upvote
London
I am interested in replacing a 18 year old furnace and AC in London Ontario townhouse, and get all of the available rebates. Done lots of research and I am leaning towards a Goodman GMVM97100SCNA with a AC of GSX16037 and a CTK04, and an april aire full house humidifier ( 12 gal./day).

Who in London could give me a great price and install it properly?

Do I need to also ask for any of the following: anti-short kit, hard start kit, freeze protection kit, liquid line solenoid kit, low ambient kit, low pressure switch kit, or a TVX?

Any opinion about the continental furnaces and AC's?

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