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Ask me anything about HVAC heating air conditioning air quality control

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  • Jul 14th, 2018 7:48 pm
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Jr. Member
Feb 9, 2006
146 posts
34 upvotes
Quentin5 wrote:
Dec 30th, 2017 5:32 am
A cracked heat exchanger sucks air out of your home, not monoxide into it, its under negative pressure, not positive.
Dude wants a sale, and heat exchangers typically have 25 year or lifetime warranties
What's the point of this ill informed post?
Deal Addict
Jan 19, 2011
2597 posts
750 upvotes
Who has recommendations for a top quality furnace installer in the North York / Thornhill area?

My parents furnace 17 years finally died (actually some overheat or high limit switch is cutting out or something) and the enercare guy was buy today and 'jury rigged' it (maybe by keeping output down or something) so that it could operate without cutting out - remember this is being described by my Mom who has no clue what is going on really.

In any event, at the current age, I think it is time for a new furnace for them, they have the budget to pay in full, just looking for a no nonsense, good quality installer (Kinda like my Dave Davies guy in Stratford)

PM me if you want rather than clogging the thread.


Thanks
"The truth is incontrovertible, malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end; there it is."
Just a guy who dabbles in lots of stuff learning along the way. I do have opinions, and readily share them!
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
14608 posts
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Hexavalent wrote:
Jan 3rd, 2018 4:51 pm
What's the point of this ill informed post?
You tell me, you seem to have the answer
General Zod for Premier would have been less evil then the other guy
Sr. Member
Sep 13, 2008
682 posts
109 upvotes
Toronto
It's pretty dry in my house right now....ecobee indicates about 20% humidity. The previous home owner installed an Aprilaire 600 whole home bypass humidifier.

I bought a new filter to insert into the water panel. I tried to give it a go today, but there seemed to be no water flowing to the humidifier. So I googled for troubleshooting.

First thing that popped up was to open water line to the humidifier. That's what I did, but then water started leaking out of the hose, feeding into the humidifier. Turns out the metal fastener has rusted and has corroded the hose.

Now I cannot turn off the water that flows to the humidifier. I've pinched the hose and put an elastic around it to stop it from leaking for now. What should I do now? who do I call? a plumber or HVAC person? Is this temporary solution good enough for a couple of days? Can I go to work tomorrow?


Water valve to turn on/off water to humidifier

Image

Temporary solution

Image

Where the hose is connected to

Image
Deal Addict
Dec 28, 2010
1113 posts
108 upvotes
Ajax
redwings_patriots wrote:
Jan 3rd, 2018 11:12 pm
It's pretty dry in my house right now....ecobee indicates about 20% humidity. The previous home owner installed an Aprilaire 600 whole home bypass humidifier.

I bought a new filter to insert into the water panel. I tried to give it a go today, but there seemed to be no water flowing to the humidifier. So I googled for troubleshooting.

First thing that popped up was to open water line to the humidifier. That's what I did, but then water started leaking out of the hose, feeding into the humidifier. Turns out the metal fastener has rusted and has corroded the hose.

Now I cannot turn off the water that flows to the humidifier. I've pinched the hose and put an elastic around it to stop it from leaking for now. What should I do now? who do I call? a plumber or HVAC person? Is this temporary solution good enough for a couple of days? Can I go to work tomorrow?


Water valve to turn on/off water to humidifier

Image

Temporary solution

Image

Where the hose is connected to

Image


Those saddle valves are bad news.

If you are comfortable cutting copper and soldering you can fix it yourself. If you don't feel comfortable with soldering, you can buy push connect fittings (SharkBite) as well.

I did it myself a year ago with no issues.
Member
Oct 9, 2011
475 posts
179 upvotes
GTA
Bellotts wrote:
Jan 4th, 2018 6:16 am
Those saddle valves are bad news.

If you are comfortable cutting copper and soldering you can fix it yourself. If you don't feel comfortable with soldering, you can buy push connect fittings (SharkBite) as well.

I did it myself a year ago with no issues.
I know nothing about soldering and plumbing and I was able to fix a kitchen sink valve using one of the SharkBite valves easily a few years ago. They sell it at Home Depot, but are not cheap compared to regular fittings....still, a hell of a lot cheaper than having a plumber come out.

https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/ideas- ... kbite.html
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Sr. Member
Sep 13, 2008
682 posts
109 upvotes
Toronto
Bellotts wrote:
Jan 4th, 2018 6:16 am


Those saddle valves are bad news.

If you are comfortable cutting copper and soldering you can fix it yourself. If you don't feel comfortable with soldering, you can buy push connect fittings (SharkBite) as well.

I did it myself a year ago with no issues.
dpw198 wrote:
Jan 4th, 2018 8:08 am
I know nothing about soldering and plumbing and I was able to fix a kitchen sink valve using one of the SharkBite valves easily a few years ago. They sell it at Home Depot, but are not cheap compared to regular fittings....still, a hell of a lot cheaper than having a plumber come out.

https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/ideas- ... kbite.html
Image

Is this what I would need? How do I know it will fit? Do I measure the pipe diameter or circumference? So the steps to install would be;

1.) turn off main water line
2.) drain hot water tank (just a guess, since water flows, even though main water line is off and water is warm)
3.) cut the saddle valve off at both ends of the copper pipe, then push the pipes into this new valve?
Member
Oct 9, 2011
475 posts
179 upvotes
GTA
redwings_patriots wrote:
Jan 4th, 2018 8:52 am
Image

Is this what I would need? How do I know it will fit? Do I measure the pipe diameter or circumference? So the steps to install would be;

1.) turn off main water line
2.) drain hot water tank (just a guess, since water flows, even though main water line is off and water is warm)
3.) cut the saddle valve off at both ends of the copper pipe, then push the pipes into this new valve?
Are you thinking of cutting the pipe underneath the 90 degree elbow? You'll need to make sure you have enough pipe underneath the 90 degree elbow to insert into the Sharkbite, if not, then you'll end up with a leak. I'm not sure the exact length that needs to be inserted though, I think it is 1 inch or so, but it will say on their website.

Not sure you would need the shutoff valve as opposed to one of these:

https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.12-i ... 60429.html

Once you have this installed, then connect your tube to run to your humdifier.

1 - yes turn off main waterline
2 - I don't know, but I would think if you shut off the main waterline and unplug your hot water heater, you wouldn't have to drain it?
3 - yes, but only cut as much as you need to be able to push the ends into the Sharkbite
4 - you measure the diameter of the pipe, not the circumference
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Newbie
May 25, 2016
34 posts
vedder311 wrote:
Jan 1st, 2018 2:48 pm
Ok so here is where I am with this;

I am pricing out a HVR for my place but it's looking like it will run me $2500-4000 for a 1800 sq ft bungalow.
In the meantime I've noticed that the 'auto-on' switch on my thermostat for the fan only works on 'auto' when I put it to 'on' it doesn't work. I figured having this run all the time would help with my air circulation. Anybody know what the issue here is with the fan?
Does anybody have any idea what I can check or do to fix this issue with the fan. I replace the thermostat, but that did not fix it, so I assume it is at the furnace level.
Sr. Member
Sep 13, 2008
682 posts
109 upvotes
Toronto
dpw198 wrote:
Jan 4th, 2018 9:41 am
Are you thinking of cutting the pipe underneath the 90 degree elbow? You'll need to make sure you have enough pipe underneath the 90 degree elbow to insert into the Sharkbite, if not, then you'll end up with a leak. I'm not sure the exact length that needs to be inserted though, I think it is 1 inch or so, but it will say on their website.

Not sure you would need the shutoff valve as opposed to one of these:

https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.12-i ... 60429.html

Once you have this installed, then connect your tube to run to your humdifier.

1 - yes turn off main waterline
2 - I don't know, but I would think if you shut off the main waterline and unplug your hot water heater, you wouldn't have to drain it?
3 - yes, but only cut as much as you need to be able to push the ends into the Sharkbite
4 - you measure the diameter of the pipe, not the circumference
I'm thinking I will need to cut the horizontal pipe and replace the 90 degree elbow, then connect copper pipe into the 90 degree elbow and add a Tee stop at the bottom of the copper pipe.

instead of a 90 degree elbow, would a braided connector be okay?
Member
Oct 9, 2011
475 posts
179 upvotes
GTA
redwings_patriots wrote:
Jan 4th, 2018 11:03 am
I'm thinking I will need to cut the horizontal pipe and replace the 90 degree elbow, then connect copper pipe into the 90 degree elbow and add a Tee stop at the bottom of the copper pipe.

instead of a 90 degree elbow, would a braided connector be okay?
It should, but I've read the Sharkbite braided hose has had issues with the rubber inside it wearing down and deteriorating over time. It's all over the internet. That was their product made a couple of years ago. Not sure if it has been corrected since.
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Jr. Member
Feb 12, 2008
131 posts
13 upvotes
Toronto
sickcars wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2018 5:37 pm
I Don't think you need a firm or whatever. If you have a good HVAC guy that knows what hes doing they can design & build it for you. I know of somebody if you are interested.

Thanks
Please do suggest. Thanks.
---------------------------------
Almost all problems in our lives can be traced back to a lack of knowledge.
Deal Addict
Dec 28, 2010
1113 posts
108 upvotes
Ajax
dpw198 wrote:
Jan 4th, 2018 9:41 am
Are you thinking of cutting the pipe underneath the 90 degree elbow? You'll need to make sure you have enough pipe underneath the 90 degree elbow to insert into the Sharkbite, if not, then you'll end up with a leak. I'm not sure the exact length that needs to be inserted though, I think it is 1 inch or so, but it will say on their website.

Not sure you would need the shutoff valve as opposed to one of these:

https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.12-i ... 60429.html

Once you have this installed, then connect your tube to run to your humdifier.

1 - yes turn off main waterline
2 - I don't know, but I would think if you shut off the main waterline and unplug your hot water heater, you wouldn't have to drain it?
3 - yes, but only cut as much as you need to be able to push the ends into the Sharkbite
4 - you measure the diameter of the pipe, not the circumference
That's the same shark bite fitting I have.

Check out shark bite YouTube videos and they explain everything amazingly. They tell you how far to push in. They also have depth took you can buy that takes the guess work out of it. You may not have enough pipe above the saddle valve so you'll probably have to cut away the elbow and replace that.

If so, replace with sharkbite elbow then either buy a brass piece and cut or even pex tubing which is what I did. Then you'll can continue installing.

I shut off main water plus cold water supply going into water heater. I didn't unplug hot water tank. Then ran the cold faucet in the basement until the line was clear. You may have some residual water left over. Make the cuts, slip on shark bite, insert plastic tube and compress the fitting with supplied Farrell/plastic/brass ring (I think that's the spelling) then then water back on and check for leaks.
Deal Addict
Dec 25, 2005
1186 posts
78 upvotes
Brantford
Hello

Long time member of RFD. Need some home advice.

My wife and I built our 1800 sq foot bungalow 10 years ago. We just finished our basement about 1 year ago. We finished off almost 1,000 sq ft of the basement including a home theatre area, a bedroom and a bathroom. My uncle who is a general contractor did the basement. It turned out spectacular but we have one concern. In the summer months it was absolutely freezing down here. To the point where my wife wouldn't even come down to the basement with our baby due to discomfort. Probably a 5 degree different in temp from the main level to the basement. I even found it too cold to want to go in the basement. Before we go any further, yes the central air was on throughout these summer months, but all basement vents were completely closed. My uncle installed only 1 cold air return in the main section of the basement. When we complained to him about the difference in temp from the main floor to the basement he said its because of the ground temp coming up. He said that the home is so well insulated that none of the warm air from outside is getting in, and we are just getting the cold air coming up from the ground. We do have a subfloor with the water barrier and it has minor R value insulation. It's nice and warm now in the basement in the winter months with the furnace on and all the basement vents open, but I know it's going to be an ice rink again come summer time once the furnace is off.

Can anything be done to correct this? Our home does have a HRV system.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
14608 posts
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If its warm in winter then you have heat from the furnace getting to it, meaning you have central air getting to it in the summer.
The cold air return means assuming the house is relatively airtight cold air will get pulled from upstairs to downstairs in the summer, pressure differences always equalize (though the source depends on the situation).
Low R value in the floor will mean about 10C at the floor (plus or minus changes caused by the environment) but if its warm in winter then its not the predominating source of cold. Also your furnace leaks hot/cold when its operating and its likely your ducts are not airtight either.

The sum of all forces (and more not described here) means the basement is warm in winter and cold in summer.
Its a very good bet insulating the floor will not give you summertime relief.
It can certainly be fixed but proper identification of the cause(s) is required to avoid throwing away money and effort.
General Zod for Premier would have been less evil then the other guy

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