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Ask me anything about HVAC heating air conditioning air quality control

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Sr. Member
Mar 6, 2005
614 posts
161 upvotes
Hi Everyone,

I have decided on the goodman GSX13 3T just wondering if anyone has any experience with this unit and how loud it is compared to a lennox or other brands.

It claims 74db

Thanks Terry
Deal Addict
Dec 15, 2006
1867 posts
148 upvotes
tpirovol wrote:
Apr 9th, 2010 8:22 pm
Hi Everyone,

I have decided on the goodman GSX13 3T just wondering if anyone has any experience with this unit and how loud it is compared to a lennox or other brands.

It claims 74db

Thanks Terry
Not the questest thing out there by any means, but they are usually offered pretty cheap. Just do your research onthe contractor.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2007
1074 posts
125 upvotes
Markham
Yes, the contractor is the most important part of the install. You can definately get better products out there, but when installed properly, that isnt a bad "Value" product.
Member
Dec 26, 2007
285 posts
12 upvotes
nighthawk26 wrote:
Apr 9th, 2010 8:03 pm
Just note, the ALMOST, and also that the efficiency will drop as well. Also certainly a higher install cost.
Funny, on al major sites (Lennox, York, Carrier, etc...) all the furnaces are gas. Do they all have to be converted or are they bi-energy and can run solely electric.

Just how much would efficiency (driving up cost to run) drop? Are there any that specifically manufacture horizontally mounted ones... BTW, I have 58 inches clearence... more than enough length an width, so that part is not a worry.
Jr. Member
Dec 29, 2003
147 posts
15 upvotes
Thornhill
Munchos wrote:
Apr 7th, 2010 4:16 pm
Limoges_shopper
For starters you are comparing A/S to Goodman... No brainer in my opinion, since Goodman is crap: their furnaces don't even have a true sealed combustion chamber like almost everyone else does. Second, the A/S has an auto-tuning feature that uses a variable spe3ed motor for the exhaust too (Goodman uses a 2-stage motor). This means the A/S will be always operating at peak efficiency.

I would opt for the 60,000 BTU'hr model for hat house - 1800 square feet is pretty small for an 80,000 BTU/HR, plus that house was built after 1976, so the building code was better then - so I don't think the heat loss would be that great.
Munchos wrote:
Apr 7th, 2010 4:16 pm
I agree. You know how often your furnace will be cycling if you installed an 80 000 btu furnace? Unless you have a whole outside wall missing, I really can't see you needing anything but a 60. I have a townhouse that is about 1700 sq ft and a 60k was adequate. You want the furnace running longer rather than coming on more often.
Thanks to L_S and Munchos for the BTU suggestiont, now I really have to figure out what the load should be for my house. I tried figuring out the btu required with a load clac software, but there are terms in there that I don't understand to properly calculate it.

I guess I will ask that the contractors that gives me quotes to do a proper load calc. Is that an industry standard for contractors to do a load calc?

If so, this gives me some doubts about my 1st quote from the contractor.

Thanks again,
VB
Sr. Member
May 24, 2003
931 posts
42 upvotes
Visorboy wrote:
Apr 10th, 2010 5:01 pm
Thanks to L_S and Munchos for the BTU suggestiont, now I really have to figure out what the load should be for my house. I tried figuring out the btu required with a load clac software, but there are terms in there that I don't understand to properly calculate it.

I guess I will ask that the contractors that gives me quotes to do a proper load calc. Is that an industry standard for contractors to do a load calc?

If so, this gives me some doubts about my 1st quote from the contractor.

Thanks again,
VB
My suggestion is to decide what company you want to deal with then ask them for a heat-load calculation. The problem with people who want this done is it is time consuming for salespeople to do. If you are asking every salesperson for one of these, its a waste of their time, and most will charge a small fee to do it. Besides, the cost from going to an 80 000 btu from a 60 000 btu furnace is chump change. It may be a couple hundred dollars more it that.
Jr. Member
Dec 29, 2003
147 posts
15 upvotes
Thornhill
Munchos wrote:
Apr 10th, 2010 5:07 pm
My suggestion is to decide what company you want to deal with then ask them for a heat-load calculation. The problem with people who want this done is it is time consuming for salespeople to do. If you are asking every salesperson for one of these, its a waste of their time, and most will charge a small fee to do it. Besides, the cost from going to an 80 000 btu from a 60 000 btu furnace is chump change. It may be a couple hundred dollars more it that.
It's not the money, but more the fact that a higher BTU rating then what I need worries me. Both you and L_S mentioned a 60k btu should be sufficient, but I guess a heat-load calc would take away any uneasiness as to what size should I be looking for in a quote.

If the heat-load calc is a waste of time for the sales people, then how do they know what BTU should be in the quote? Doesn't this tell us consumers that if the salesperson that gives a quote without a h-l calc may be in fact not quoting the correct system for our house(s)?

Eventhough you mentioned that 60k btu is good enough for your 1700 sq townhome, would an 1800 sq detached home required the higher btu?

I am just trying to become a more educated consumer and hopefully at the end, get a product that is best suited for my needs.

I really apreciate the info. that you and other posters provide here in this thread, and I'm sure all the RFD'ers here do too.

Thank-you.
VB
Newbie
Nov 9, 2009
40 posts
Mississauga, ON
hi bririp,
I'd like your expertise on this. My thermostat display went blank this morning. I replaced the batteries on the thermostat, and after a few hours, display came back on, however, when I set the heating on, I can hear the furnace starting up as usual, but NO air coming out of the vent at all. I highly suspect it's the fan (or motor of the fan failed) since for some reason, the fan has always been on day or night whether I set it on or off.
Would you be able to tell what went wrong given the above information? or what are the possibilities that can result in no air flow?
How much does it roughly cost to replace the motor if that's the case? thank you for your help.
Jr. Member
Jun 26, 2006
189 posts
28 upvotes
Ottawa
We live in Ottawa and are getting quotes to replace our 20 year old gas furnace. We live in a 1,500 sq. ft 4 bedroom bungalow built in 1969. I was told by the only licensed tech/owner who did a quote (the others were sales people) that the ductwork feeding out from the furnace is a large diameter, probably what they used in most houses from that era.

This licensed tech/owner who has worked on our furnace and ac in the past and is very knowledgeable, quoted me at 2 price points. The lowest was a Goodman and the 2nd was a Keepright VS95 which he said was a good unit. When I asked him if there was something better, he then suggested a Rheem RGFD modulating.

He did not quote us on it until I had asked him for a better unit.

The Rheem RGFD 75,0000 BTU is $700 more than the Keepright 80,000 when you take into account the RGFD includes the thermostat and the Keepright would require a $160 2 stage thermostat.

Rheem RGFD qualifies for $1250 in rebates NOT $1580. So after rebates the Rheem RGFD from this supplier would cost us about $1000 more than the Keepright VS 95. We have had quotes on Lennox G61 which is close in price to the Keepright, but I prefer the installer of the Keepright plus he would be doing about $500 of added work included in the price. So the Keepright is about $500 less than the Lennox in reality.

Even though he didn't originally suggest the Rheem due to the higher cost he feels it is by far the best furnace for our application. He has installed a lot of them, they have been on the market for a long time and are reliable and he feels with our large ductwork would make our home the most comfortable with the least fuss over the life of the unit.

He is not pushing it though, leaving it up to us, and I do trust him.

Any thoughts appreciated.
Deal Expert
User avatar
May 10, 2005
33672 posts
7653 upvotes
Ottawa
BaadDawg wrote:
Apr 11th, 2010 4:18 pm
We live in Ottawa and are getting quotes to replace our 20 year old gas furnace. We live in a 1,500 sq. ft 4 bedroom bungalow built in 1969. I was told by the only licensed tech/owner who did a quote (the others were sales people) that the ductwork feeding out from the furnace is a large diameter, probably what they used in most houses from that era.

This licensed tech/owner who has worked on our furnace and ac in the past and is very knowledgeable, quoted me at 2 price points. The lowest was a Goodman and the 2nd was a Keepright VS95 which he said was a good unit. When I asked him if there was something better, he then suggested a Rheem RGFD modulating.

He did not quote us on it until I had asked him for a better unit.

The Rheem RGFD 75,0000 BTU is $700 more than the Keepright 80,000 when you take into account the RGFD includes the thermostat and the Keepright would require a $160 2 stage thermostat.

Rheem RGFD qualifies for $1250 in rebates NOT $1580. So after rebates the Rheem RGFD from this supplier would cost us about $1000 more than the Keepright VS 95. We have had quotes on Lennox G61 which is close in price to the Keepright, but I prefer the installer of the Keepright plus he would be doing about $500 of added work included in the price. So the Keepright is about $500 less than the Lennox in reality.

Even though he didn't originally suggest the Rheem due to the higher cost he feels it is by far the best furnace for our application. He has installed a lot of them, they have been on the market for a long time and are reliable and he feels with our large ductwork would make our home the most comfortable with the least fuss over the life of the unit.

He is not pushing it though, leaving it up to us, and I do trust him.

Any thoughts appreciated.
If you are in the Ottawa area, I strongly suggest you contact Limoges_Shopper. PM him. He is on this forum and helps a lot. He also is in the business. I am not pushing business his way (although he deserves it and the company he works with is one of the best in the area) but the comment your furnace guy made about the ducting has me concerned as to why he made it. Is he trying to build an excuse if things do not work out?
Jr. Member
Jun 26, 2006
189 posts
28 upvotes
Ottawa
He made the comment because we require a larger BTU furnace than a 1,500 sq ft house would normally use, due to the large ducts. One salesman speced out a 60,000 BTU furnace that would probably not be right.
Sr. Member
May 24, 2003
931 posts
42 upvotes
BaadDawg wrote:
Apr 11th, 2010 5:54 pm
He made the comment because we require a larger BTU furnace than a 1,500 sq ft house would normally use, due to the large ducts. One salesman speced out a 60,000 BTU furnace that would probably not be right.
I'm just wondering how you are getting that much rebate back for the Rheem? I'm assuming you enrolled in the government eco audit program before they cancelled it? Oh and nothing is free, so that $500 in extra work you are paying for it somewhere.
Deal Addict
Dec 15, 2006
1867 posts
148 upvotes
aegean wrote:
Apr 10th, 2010 10:22 am
Funny, on al major sites (Lennox, York, Carrier, etc...) all the furnaces are gas. Do they all have to be converted or are they bi-energy and can run solely electric.

Just how much would efficiency (driving up cost to run) drop? Are there any that specifically manufacture horizontally mounted ones... BTW, I have 58 inches clearence... more than enough length an width, so that part is not a worry.
Sorry, I have no idea what you're talking about with furnaces being gas and conversions. You talk about bi energy, are you refering to things like "hybrid" from York? These are all gas furnaces. Only one source of "fuel" The only thing that changes around that stuff is if you use a heat pump. They in will run on electricity until temps get too cold before the furnace fires.

Efficiency loss with a horizonal will vary between brand but about 5% give or take a bit.
Deal Addict
Dec 15, 2006
1867 posts
148 upvotes
BaadDawg wrote:
Apr 11th, 2010 4:18 pm
We live in Ottawa and are getting quotes to replace our 20 year old gas furnace. We live in a 1,500 sq. ft 4 bedroom bungalow built in 1969. I was told by the only licensed tech/owner who did a quote (the others were sales people) that the ductwork feeding out from the furnace is a large diameter, probably what they used in most houses from that era.

This licensed tech/owner who has worked on our furnace and ac in the past and is very knowledgeable, quoted me at 2 price points. The lowest was a Goodman and the 2nd was a Keepright VS95 which he said was a good unit. When I asked him if there was something better, he then suggested a Rheem RGFD modulating.

He did not quote us on it until I had asked him for a better unit.

The Rheem RGFD 75,0000 BTU is $700 more than the Keepright 80,000 when you take into account the RGFD includes the thermostat and the Keepright would require a $160 2 stage thermostat.

Rheem RGFD qualifies for $1250 in rebates NOT $1580. So after rebates the Rheem RGFD from this supplier would cost us about $1000 more than the Keepright VS 95. We have had quotes on Lennox G61 which is close in price to the Keepright, but I prefer the installer of the Keepright plus he would be doing about $500 of added work included in the price. So the Keepright is about $500 less than the Lennox in reality.

Even though he didn't originally suggest the Rheem due to the higher cost he feels it is by far the best furnace for our application. He has installed a lot of them, they have been on the market for a long time and are reliable and he feels with our large ductwork would make our home the most comfortable with the least fuss over the life of the unit.

He is not pushing it though, leaving it up to us, and I do trust him.

Any thoughts appreciated.
I'd be taking the G61 no question. If it's even CLOSE to the Keeprite unit, all they did was build WAY more margin into the Keeprite. Markets aside, typical Keeprite V95's go for anywhere from $3600-$4000 depending. Lennox G61's typically go for $4300-$4700.

What I'm getting at here is if I offered you a Ford Focus INCLUDING "FREE" winter tires, and then say A Honda Civic and they were even remotely close in price, would you be making a wise choice on the Ford Cause of the extra "value" they are claiming to add? He's making a KILLING on the Keeprite if it's close in price...period.
Jr. Member
Jun 26, 2006
189 posts
28 upvotes
Ottawa
It's the Rheem RGFD I am really seeking an opinon on, not the Keepright, but thanks for the input.

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