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Ask me anything about HVAC heating air conditioning air quality control

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Deal Addict
Dec 15, 2006
1867 posts
148 upvotes
BaadDawg wrote:
Apr 11th, 2010 7:53 pm
It's the Rheem RGFD I am really seeking an opinon on, not the Keepright, but thanks for the input.
I'll clerify further. THe Rheem is $1000 more than the Keeprite and the Lennox wasn't much more than the Keeprite. My opinion is the same. Although I feel Rheem is better than Keeprite, it's NOT the Lennox G61 and how it's possibly that much more makes no sense. Rheem stuff to keep the comparison going averages $200-$400 less than the Lennox.

Also consider the Lennox (and the Keeprite for that matter), would qualify for the $1580 rebate assuming you're replacing a mid or older.

At the same time, you have to be comfortable with the contractor, as the install to your application is very important.
Jr. Member
Jun 26, 2006
189 posts
28 upvotes
Ottawa
[quote="nighthawk26" post_id="10642782" time="1271036335" user_id="71484"]
Also consider the Lennox (and the Keeprite for that matter), would qualify for the $1580 rebate assuming you're replacing a mid or older.QUOTE]

My understanding is the Rheem RGFD qualifies for $1250 in rebates, or $320 less than 95% eff models.

In some other HVAC forums I have been reading the debate on the RGFD vs the G71 (which is in a higher price range than the G61) most of the contractors seem to prefer the RGFD. Again I am a layman here not a contractor just seeking information to make the right decision and I appreciate the input.
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User avatar
Jun 13, 2003
198 posts
13 upvotes
I am curious to know the answer to this question too, anyone?
My heating does not seem that great at all either.
emale wrote:
Oct 2nd, 2009 1:14 pm
I live in a stacked townhome.I have a basement area and a main floor.

My heating system is a hi velocity system.It sits right next to my hot water tank and the heat from the hot water is used to heat my home. My ac unit sits on my deck and it too is connected to the h velocity system.In the middle of winter,i feel it takes longer to warm up my home.

Can i install a natural gas furnace ? a friend of mine told me that it might not work as my ducts are pretty small ( and hence the hi velocity system).

Also,is there a way to check if my heating system and ac (carrier) is a high efficiency model ? My home was built in 2006.

thanks
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May 10, 2005
33445 posts
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Ottawa
BaadDawg wrote:
Apr 11th, 2010 5:54 pm
He made the comment because we require a larger BTU furnace than a 1,500 sq ft house would normally use, due to the large ducts. One salesman speced out a 60,000 BTU furnace that would probably not be right.
Actually, he may be right. I downsized my furnace when going form the old to the high efficiency new and it has worked out very well. Not only did I go from mid efficient but also to a lower BTU and I see it on my bills. The house was as warm as ever and in fact, we turned the thermostat down a bit.
He needs to come out and do a heat loss calculation and with that, will provide you with a very accurate recommendation. This calculation by the way, is more than just counting the number of windows.
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Nov 21, 2009
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Ottawa
BaadDawg wrote:
Apr 11th, 2010 5:54 pm
He made the comment because we require a larger BTU furnace than a 1,500 sq ft house would normally use, due to the large ducts. One salesman speced out a 60,000 BTU furnace that would probably not be right.
What a moron!!!! The guy is obviously not knowledgeable in HVAC. Large ducts = smaller blower, not larger blower!!!!!! Run away from morons because they cause you to select the wrong equipment. I can't stress how bad this guy's information is - it's like saying that you will use 1/2 the fuel driving from A to B if you drive twice as fast...
Idiots selling products: their only success in this industry is in the ability in being compelling - and trusting customers give them money, lots of it...

I can back this up by showing you friction tables for various duct sizes, and that show the LARGER the duct size, the LOWER the friction for any given airflow. And then I can show you ANY blower performance specification (the part that moves the air), and it will show you that the lower the friction, the greater the airflow. So how on Earth is selecting a larger furnace going to be required when you have a lower friction?
Your salesman is a moron, and idiot and a liar. Don't: 1) follow his advice, and 2) buy from him. - You can't trust anything that comes out of his mouth because he is clueless!

Now let's look at the Rheem furnaces: 10 - 15 years ago, they made nice ones. Today, they are less than good - as you have already stated, they don't qualify for the maximum grants! But they even drop the ball some more:
They were one of the first to come up with a modulating gas furnaces. And people thought they were going to save tons of money with them, because the furnace would tune its output to the house's heat loss. This meant that there would be less over-shooting of target temperature, and thus less energy being used.
But they did 1 critical cost-cutting shortcut: they used a 2-stage (2-speed) exhaust fan (not the blower for the house) instead of a modulating exhaust fan. Why is this important? Because perfect fuel-to-air mixture (ratio) is critical to perfect fuel efficiency. Too rich or too lean a mixture, and your efficiency goes out of whack. and by "out of whack" I mean it drops to less than what they advertise!
What is happening: regardless of the amount of fuel entering the combustion chamber, there are only 2 amounts or air being mixed in. Why? Because the exhaust fan is the device that SUCKS in the air for the combustion process! So if you modulate the gas going into a combustion chamber, you must modulate the air being mixed with the gas too!
So if you read the brochure carefully, the rated efficiency would only be at 2 points: around 70% output and at 100% output.

So any company that would be misleading (that claim of efficiency was in big letters all over the brochure, but there was a small print footnote telling the whole truth - you can be guaranteed that the salesman weren't pointing this out to the homeowners too!) in this fashion should be avoided.

And this also happens with 2-stage furnaces: good furnace manufacturers use a modulating exhaust fan even with 2-stage gas furnaces. Why? Because atmospheric conditions are constantly changing, and the air density and wind conditions come into play. So a high-end gas furnace will actually tune (vary) the exhaust fan so that it is bringing in the correct amount of air so you enjoy the perfect fuel-to-air mixture EVERY TIME, ALL THE TIME.

Ask the right questions. Demand written proof. Demand a higher level of education or at least knowledge from the person asking you to spend thousands of your hard-earned dollars (if you won the lottery, then I don't care about you! hehe!).

And when you're ready to sign on the dotted line, check with us here at Red Flag Deals just to make sure!
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Deal Addict
Dec 15, 2006
1867 posts
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Laurent, I wish this industry was as you described and I sense you feel the same given the comment about the only way to be successful isgood lip service, etc. Its so hard to not get caught up in it too becasue I go into houses and see SOOOO much of it. Then you say something that contradicts (however is correct) and they think you're lying to them casue the"other guy" said otherwise.

Finding ONE rep like you've suggested is difficult or impossible. I can't imagine what it would be like trying to find MULTIPLE reps like that. It's more than frustrating not only for customers, but also for those of us in the business who are genuinly looking out for the customers best interest.
Newbie
Aug 29, 2004
92 posts
11 upvotes
Toronto
to all the HVAC pros out there, I am looking at an AC install, either an A/S or a Trane, now if I go with the A/S the installers that I received quotes from all use either ADP or Aspen evap coils, all the Trane installers say they will be using a Trane evap coil....What is the real diff between all the available evap coils out there? Are there any specific evap coils to keep away from?

If any pros can chime in thanks
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Jun 23, 2007
1362 posts
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toronto
is it really necessary to do the annual tune-up/checkup for the AC unit?
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Nov 21, 2009
1827 posts
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Ottawa
zones wrote:
Apr 13th, 2010 1:30 pm
to all the HVAC pros out there, I am looking at an AC install, either an A/S or a Trane, now if I go with the A/S the installers that I received quotes from all use either ADP or Aspen evap coils, all the Trane installers say they will be using a Trane evap coil....What is the real diff between all the available evap coils out there? Are there any specific evap coils to keep away from?

If any pros can chime in thanks
All that really matters is if the ARI numbers match up with the ARI certification for the efficiency rating. They all have a performance criteria that they must meet, and if they do that, they will be just fine.

Cheers!
If you like my post, please upvote! :)
Putting people and solutions together since 1995
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Nov 21, 2009
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joeym wrote:
Apr 13th, 2010 1:32 pm
is it really necessary to do the annual tune-up/checkup for the AC unit?
It's a good thing, so you know if you have a refrigerant leaks. Some air conditioners loose refrigerant during the Winter months from the service valves (Goodmans are notorious for this....). You don't want to run an air conditioner without refrigerant - it could lead to some costly repairs. Also, you want to ensure that it's clean: a clean air conditioner operates more efficiently. Plus, it's a good time to have a technician poke their head inside your furnace to ensure that it made it through the Winter OK, and that everything is clean inside there too.
If you like my post, please upvote! :)
Putting people and solutions together since 1995
Need quick advice? Email me at RFDfanOttawa@gmail.com
Member
Oct 30, 2005
312 posts
13 upvotes
Victoria, BC
I'm in the market for a new AC unit - current 2.5 ton Keeprite is about 10-15 years old and on it's last legs. It will be paired with a Lennox G61V furnace and SignatureStat... house is about 2800 sq ft.

Anyone know of any deals to be had in the Kitchener-Waterloo area?
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Nov 21, 2009
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canuck88 wrote:
Apr 13th, 2010 3:30 pm
I'm in the market for a new AC unit - current 2.5 ton Keeprite is about 10-15 years old and on it's last legs. It will be paired with a Lennox G61V furnace and SignatureStat... house is about 2800 sq ft.

Anyone know of any deals to be had in the Kitchener-Waterloo area?
Talk to nighthawk26: he's from that area and can help you locate someone.
If you like my post, please upvote! :)
Putting people and solutions together since 1995
Need quick advice? Email me at RFDfanOttawa@gmail.com
Jr. Member
Dec 29, 2003
147 posts
15 upvotes
Thornhill
After browsing some installs, what are the advantages and disadvantages of how the AC is mounted? I some that are on steel brackets and then there are some that just sit on a slab like a patio tile? What is the norm?

I can see with a wall mount, one can cut grass below and maybe get some ait flow underneath. Is there like a maximum weight of AC which can wall mounted? Do the brackets sag over time?

sorry for the many questions from the newb, but I'm trying to be a more educated consumer.

VB
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Dec 21, 2008
14 posts
Limoges_shopper wrote:
Apr 13th, 2010 3:39 pm
Talk to nighthawk26: he's from that area and can help you locate someone.
I can second the recommendation for nighthawk26... I'm in london, but he still helped me get a great deal and service with aire-one london.
Deal Addict
Dec 15, 2006
1867 posts
148 upvotes
joeym wrote:
Apr 13th, 2010 1:32 pm
is it really necessary to do the annual tune-up/checkup for the AC unit?
If you want to keep the warranty valid by the manufacturer, yes. Read your warranty paperwork.

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