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Ask me anything about spray foam insulation

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  • Oct 2nd, 2019 4:19 pm
Deal Addict
Dec 15, 2009
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Ontario
Quentin5 wrote:
Jan 8th, 2019 8:04 pm
If the house is not yet built then R10 rigid foam under the concrete pad is the best solution and exterior or interior rigid foam for the basement walls is most cost effective.
Both should be incorporated during the design stage.
Cost for floor please. It is an upgrade ($4450 for 1576 sq ft) and I want to know if the offer is fair. Something about styrofoam product.

I am fine with ICF foundation for insulation. Since it is foam insulation on both sides I don't see a need for more rigid foam ..
Newbie
Jan 3, 2019
2 posts
Thanks for the help Peter.

I don’t care about the room looking like a cave as it’s a mechanical room. But I’m not sure if there are companies out there that install cementitious spray on a small scale? Also, this would mean applying sprayfoam without a studwall is possible?

Would rockwool comfortboard be OK if left uncovered? I’m leaning towards leaving the room uninsulated on the walls (it’s an uneven rubble foundation circa 1913 with lots of parging over the years, so rigid board would be difficult to apply), but putting comfortboard into the rim hoist around the many exhaust pipes.
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riffr aff wrote:
Jan 9th, 2019 1:46 pm
Cost for floor please. It is an upgrade ($4450 for 1576 sq ft) and I want to know if the offer is fair. Something about styrofoam product.

I am fine with ICF foundation for insulation. Since it is foam insulation on both sides I don't see a need for more rigid foam ..
I'm not an installer so i can't provide prices.
How many Rs is your proposed ICF?
All spirits are enslaved that serve things evil
[OP]
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kirbydier847397 wrote:
Jan 13th, 2019 11:01 am
Thanks for the help Peter.

I don’t care about the room looking like a cave as it’s a mechanical room. But I’m not sure if there are companies out there that install cementitious spray on a small scale? Also, this would mean applying sprayfoam without a studwall is possible?

Would rockwool comfortboard be OK if left uncovered? I’m leaning towards leaving the room uninsulated on the walls (it’s an uneven rubble foundation circa 1913 with lots of parging over the years, so rigid board would be difficult to apply), but putting comfortboard into the rim hoist around the many exhaust pipes.
Unfortunately I can't comment on that. It would be best to confirm with a building inspector or a fire marshal. Sorry I can't be of more help.
--
Peter
Owner, VIPFoam.com
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@PeterLN, Thanks for this thread , very helpful information !

I have very cold bonus room on top of Garage , and there are NO Foam and only 4 inch batts on garage roof behind dry wall . And the duct I have to feed the room above garage only have slim layer of foil insulation wrapped over, thus the Air come out of those duct are cold .

If I want to get it foam sprayed , What's better time to do that ? Right now , March , May ? Myself is not handy enough to take down the drywall so that need to be count in , not sure is this any related ..

Thanks in advance

Jason
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Jan 31, 2019
1 posts
Approximately how much would it cost to build a spray foam rig capable of small-medium sized jobs with or without a generator?
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jason.lqs wrote:
Jan 22nd, 2019 9:03 pm
@PeterLN, Thanks for this thread , very helpful information !

I have very cold bonus room on top of Garage , and there are NO Foam and only 4 inch batts on garage roof behind dry wall . And the duct I have to feed the room above garage only have slim layer of foil insulation wrapped over, thus the Air come out of those duct are cold .

If I want to get it foam sprayed , What's better time to do that ? Right now , March , May ? Myself is not handy enough to take down the drywall so that need to be count in , not sure is this any related ..

Thanks in advance

Jason
Any time is pretty much a good time to install the insulation. Preferably a day that is warmer than -10c. For this project you would need to find yourself a handyman with a truck to remove the old drywall and insulation and take to a dump. As for the removal and re install of drywall, that will be a conversation to have with your handyman/contractor.
--
Peter
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Nov 16, 2011
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HAMILTON
Quick question....... come into possession of a raised ranch home that has a brick front but the brick is badly spalding in some places. Plus the brick is very porous and in heavy rain can actually penetrate the outside wall to the inside. Basement was drywalled and I pulled some of the drywall to find the outside brick wall, no plywood/chipboard, insulation, etc.
Realistically, best course would be to strip off all the brick, nail up plywood etc and then rebrick the wall. However that is quite costly.
So, my question is, rather than pull all the brick, I would like to just pull the badly spalded bricks and replace them. Treat the outside brick wall to prevent any further water absorbtion/penetration.
I would then simply pull all the inside drywall and have the walls spray foamed. Spray foam would be applied to from the interior side of the brick wall to the depth of a 2x4 and then walls would be drywalled again,

Is if feasible to spray foam directly from the interior side of the brick wall to the full depth of the interior 2x4 studding and then drywall ?
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Nov 26, 2008
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GTA
Here is a question-
Cathedral ceilings through the whole home.
It’s a 1960’s raised ranch.

I’m due for a new roof and I find my home gets crazy hot in the summer. We avoid using the oven entirely.

My plan is to rip the roof off and the sheathing. Run my electrical for new pot lights since the home has poor lightning. Then have a spray foam installer fill the entire void with closed cell spray foam before sealing the roof up with new sheathing and shingles.

My questions are

Do I still need that gap between the sheathing and top of spray foam or is the joist space completely filled now?

Thanks,
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Jul 10, 2008
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@Peter

Thanks for the information , i was thinking those insulation worker can take down the drywall instead of putting back which is more complicated . I will try March then which is more comfortable for the handyman come in .

I will check back with you at March for insulation quote then.


PeterLN wrote:
Feb 1st, 2019 11:19 pm
Any time is pretty much a good time to install the insulation. Preferably a day that is warmer than -10c. For this project you would need to find yourself a handyman with a truck to remove the old drywall and insulation and take to a dump. As for the removal and re install of drywall, that will be a conversation to have with your handyman/contractor.
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May 6, 2009
43 posts
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Montreal
Not sure if this has been asked.
I have a type of mansard roof/ siding on my 1974 home. This is for the siding only, roof is flat, with no attic.
I plan on changing shingles on side of home, now if i remove shingles and plywood can i use spray foam there on exterior wall to boost up r-value ?
Then reinstall plywood and shingles. Or is it better to insulate from the inside, just way easier on outside when renovating the roof.
Keeping inside intact not disturbing drywall.
Or will it cause moisture issues ?
Thanks !
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luckystrike1 wrote:
Feb 3rd, 2019 10:18 pm
Quick question....... come into possession of a raised ranch home that has a brick front but the brick is badly spalding in some places. Plus the brick is very porous and in heavy rain can actually penetrate the outside wall to the inside. Basement was drywalled and I pulled some of the drywall to find the outside brick wall, no plywood/chipboard, insulation, etc.
Realistically, best course would be to strip off all the brick, nail up plywood etc and then rebrick the wall. However that is quite costly.
So, my question is, rather than pull all the brick, I would like to just pull the badly spalded bricks and replace them. Treat the outside brick wall to prevent any further water absorbtion/penetration.
I would then simply pull all the inside drywall and have the walls spray foamed. Spray foam would be applied to from the interior side of the brick wall to the depth of a 2x4 and then walls would be drywalled again,

Is if feasible to spray foam directly from the interior side of the brick wall to the full depth of the interior 2x4 studding and then drywall ?
As long as the brick is fully dry then yes the foam can be applied to almost any substrate that is clean and dry. I would not recommend going the full depth of the 2x4, simply 2" or 3" would do. Also don't rely on the foam to be your water proofing membrane, it is not designed for that.
--
Peter
Owner, VIPFoam.com
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bostonontario wrote:
Feb 4th, 2019 9:33 am
Here is a question-
Cathedral ceilings through the whole home.
It’s a 1960’s raised ranch.

I’m due for a new roof and I find my home gets crazy hot in the summer. We avoid using the oven entirely.

My plan is to rip the roof off and the sheathing. Run my electrical for new pot lights since the home has poor lightning. Then have a spray foam installer fill the entire void with closed cell spray foam before sealing the roof up with new sheathing and shingles.

My questions are

Do I still need that gap between the sheathing and top of spray foam or is the joist space completely filled now?

Thanks,
You can definitely have someone come out and spray your ceilings. As long as the back of your drywall is dry. Ensure boxes are installed over the pot lights too. The challenge with a job like this is coordinating your trades and the weather. Wind will be a big factor, even a small breeze can send over spray a few hundred feet away onto your neighbour's property or cars.

A full fill of the joists would be very expensive, all I would recommend is 5" is you are in the greater Toronto climate. 5" would be R31 in multiple layers. Any more then it would require an additional day for the install. As for your question about the gap, well that's more of a roofing question. We spray sloped ceilings often, some vented and some not. I read a study out of BC where they tested the temperature difference between the two and found it was minimal.
--
Peter
Owner, VIPFoam.com
Sr. Member
Nov 16, 2011
991 posts
654 upvotes
HAMILTON
Thanks for the info Peter. Your help is appreciated.
Newbie
Feb 14, 2019
1 posts
PeterLN wrote:
Apr 21st, 2016 10:27 pm
I don’t really have anything bad to say about Walltite Eco, after all it’s a good product and would be my second choice after Plarfoam. Everyone will tell you their Product is the best but the way to check is on the technical data sheets of each product which I have discussed in the past. If you do go ahead with the Walltite then just make sure V3 is written on the drum and not V2. Also I am not 100% sure of Morision Hersfeild Warranty is or the amount they cover; I do know that CUFCA is the industry leader.
Hi Peter, I found this gem of a thread and thank you for donating your time and expertise. I live in Ottawa but will recommend you to friends in the GTA.

I'm shopping for quotes to sprayfoam my basement headers. My number one concern is health of my family so I've opted for the Walltite Eco product and mandatory stringent application standards. I've noticed that you said in a past post to make sure its the Eco V3 and not the V2. I received a quote with the V2. What's the difference between the two? I've read both techinical data sheets but I dont know how to interprete the info.

Cheers!
Alex
Last edited by ameds613 on Feb 16th, 2019 9:39 am, edited 1 time in total.

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