Health & Wellness

Ask A Pharmacist Thread

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  • Jan 7th, 2019 10:22 pm
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Deal Addict
Mar 11, 2016
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so is taking OLEX safe longterm?
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Apr 1, 2004
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Fjr2005 wrote:
Aug 12th, 2016 12:23 pm
so is taking OLEX safe longterm?
where's OP? too busy with work I presume...

anyway

here's the precaution for omeprazole from the mayo clinic
http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplem ... g-20066836

recently, PPIs have been linked with bone fractures, which is why most doctors will recommend people who have been on PPIs for a while to try step-down therapy, essentially to come off the PPI slowly or by replacing it with an H2-blocker (eg Zantac)

so basically for PPIs, if you can stop taking it, through step down therapy or changes in diet/lifestyle (or perhaps treatment for H pylori), then great
but if after trying you still end up needing a PPI, then so be it

considering you are asking about OLEX, which is OTC
you should ask your dr about whether or not you actually need it (meaning are you sure you have acid reflux)
Deal Addict
Aug 19, 2011
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I was wondering is it possible to ask the pharmacy to dispense/do not dispense certain brands.

I recently filled two prescriptions recently at Costco and one was filled with product from Auro Pharma and the other Ranbaxy. I noticed later both of these are either Indian or owned by Indian companies.

Is it possible to ask the pharmacy when filling the prescription that I do not want products made by these companies?

The pharmacy is Costco and the products are fairly common antibiotics if it helps.

Thank you
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Aug 1, 2008
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payam1981 wrote:
Nov 7th, 2016 7:30 pm
I was wondering is it possible to ask the pharmacy to dispense/do not dispense certain brands.

I recently filled two prescriptions recently at Costco and one was filled with product from Auro Pharma and the other Ranbaxy. I noticed later both of these are either Indian or owned by Indian companies.

Is it possible to ask the pharmacy when filling the prescription that I do not want products made by these companies?

The pharmacy is Costco and the products are fairly common antibiotics if it helps.

Thank you
I'd guess that it's possible to specify brand preference. Costco usually defaults to giving you whatever's cheaper, but sometimes I've had the pharmacist ask me if there's a brand I want. Of course, that's generally been if there's an "official" brand and then a knock-off/generic alternative. I get asked this a bit more often at Shoppers, but I don't see why you can't just ask the pharmacist to avoid a brand, if possible.
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Mar 28, 2006
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Of course you can. It may not be covered, plus you may need to wait a day for delivery though.
payam1981 wrote:
Nov 7th, 2016 7:30 pm
I was wondering is it possible to ask the pharmacy to dispense/do not dispense certain brands.

I recently filled two prescriptions recently at Costco and one was filled with product from Auro Pharma and the other Ranbaxy. I noticed later both of these are either Indian or owned by Indian companies.

Is it possible to ask the pharmacy when filling the prescription that I do not want products made by these companies?

The pharmacy is Costco and the products are fairly common antibiotics if it helps.

Thank you
Deal Guru
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Mar 14, 2005
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What r the most-often prescribed medications for chronic conditions common in older people?

I am guessing the drugs r for:

blood-thinning
stomach acidity
high blood pressure
high cholesterol
water retention
pain
nerve pain
anti-anxiety and anti-depressants

Anything else? Is there a prescription to help with arthritis?
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Feb 23, 2015
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You hit most of them, I would also add diabetes, anti-parkinson and sleeping aids to the list.

In terms of names, off the top of my head I can think of:
Warfarin, lasix, hydromorphone, tylenol with codine, gabapentin, seroquel, pentoprazole, metformin, levodopa-carbidopa, trazodone, vitamin D and calcium are very common and Donepezil.

In terms of medications for arthritis, I can think of tylenol and voltaren gel.

I am sure there are more.
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Jun 20, 2011
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Becks wrote:
Dec 3rd, 2016 6:16 pm
What r the most-often prescribed medications for chronic conditions common in older people?

I am guessing the drugs r for:

blood-thinning - warfarin, fragmin
stomach acidity - all "prazole" meds like - rabeprazole, omeprazole, pantoprazole magnesium and sodium (1st and 2nd line PPIs)
high blood pressure - tons of meds for this condition - candesartan, bisoprolol, losartan, metoprolol, amlodipine, carvedilol (ARBs)
high cholesterol - All the "Statin" meds like - Rosuvastatin, Lovastatin, Simvastatin, etc
water retention - spironolactone, furosemide
pain - lenoltec, ketorolac, tramadol, methadone, naproxen
nerve pain - gabapentin
anti-anxiety - lorazepam, chlordiazepoxide, bromazepam
anti-depressants - fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, bupropion, citalopram,escitalopram, venlafaxine

Anything else? Is there a prescription to help with arthritis? - celecoxib, humira, methacin/colchine/alopurinol (gout meds), meloxicam, diclofenac, naproxen
Some examples bolded above. I'm not a pharmacist, but I do deal with drugs on a daily basis for work. If you are in BC make sure you are registered with Pharmacare. Plus some health insurance plans do require special authority for certain meds before coverage is considered.
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Why? Are you conducting a research?
Becks wrote:
Dec 3rd, 2016 6:16 pm
What r the most-often prescribed medications for chronic conditions common in older people?

I am guessing the drugs r for:

blood-thinning
stomach acidity
high blood pressure
high cholesterol
water retention
pain
nerve pain
anti-anxiety and anti-depressants

Anything else? Is there a prescription to help with arthritis?
Deal Guru
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Mar 14, 2005
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City of Vancouver
82 wrote:
Dec 12th, 2016 10:46 am
Why? Are you conducting a research?
Ya, I'd like to avoid taking those types of medications in old age by making the right lifestyle choices now while I still have time.
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Becks wrote:
Dec 13th, 2016 10:39 pm
Ya, I'd like to avoid taking those types of medications in old age by making the right lifestyle choices now while I still have time.
Well from your questions your concerned with heart disease, stroke, arthritis, depression, kidney failure and nerve damage.
For heart disease/stroke/arthritis you should make sure you eat healthy (avoid trans fats/processed foods, reduce carbohydrates/sugars, and eat a good percent of your diet in vegetables, meat and some dairy), exercise regularly, get sunlight, and consume vitamin K2. This one is not at all well known but is being backed up by increasing amounts of research and will prevent arterial plaques which can lead to heart attack/stroke. Its actually an essential nutrient but has only been discovered recently. Its found in free range meats (most of our meat is factory farmed) and natto (japanese fermented soybeans) or in supplement form. Do look up the research that has been done and is continuing on it. It also reduces arthritic inflammation and prevents osteoporosis. Start here

For depression there are pills which are basically chemical uppers, or you can deal with the actual problems, depression is basically a loss of hope, find the reasons and deal with them (ranging form loneliness, stress, perfectionism, emotional trauma, etc) and you can avoid the pills. A good counselor can help, though most of their training involves teaching you to ignore your problems and they will go away which does not work, you must search for someone who you really connect with (can take a lot of meeting different counselors) and work together on finding that hope.

As for nerve damage unless its genetic or caused by something mentioned above its not easy to prevent, try to prevent injuries, go to a good chiropractor (many are hacks) for back pain instead of the muscle relaxants and pain killers doctors give. A healthy lifestyle and uplifting friends/adventure is the best method for being healthy long term.

All that said i'm not a pharmacist or doctor, so take everything i just posted with a grain of salt and do your own research to form your own opinions.
The beatings will continue until morale improves
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Bringing this thread from the dead...any pharmacist comments about PCSK9 inhibitors like Repatha or Praluent vs the traditional statins like Lipitor or Crestor? Current prices on these inhibitors? Thanks.

Dave
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It's new, if Lipitor works, stick with it.
DavidY wrote:
Dec 23rd, 2018 1:31 pm
Bringing this thread from the dead...any pharmacist comments about PCSK9 inhibitors like Repatha or Praluent vs the traditional statins like Lipitor or Crestor? Current prices on these inhibitors? Thanks.

Dave
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82 wrote:
Dec 25th, 2018 11:38 am
It's new, if Lipitor works, stick with it.
Tried both Lipitor and Crestor at the high doses...too many side effects like muscle aches, joint pain, memory fog, memory loss, headaches, sleep issues, insomnia etc.
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DavidY wrote:
Dec 27th, 2018 8:38 pm
Tried both Lipitor and Crestor at the high doses...too many side effects like muscle aches, joint pain, memory fog, memory loss, headaches, sleep issues, insomnia etc.
Wow so it was breaking down your muscles and interfering with your brain function. The muscle breakdown is not unusual but the brain function is a known side effect but rather rare.
If it was only breaking down your muscles your doctor might have said take it at night so it would break them down while your asleep and you wouldn't complain.
The beatings will continue until morale improves

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