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Ask a Recruiter Anything (interview tips, resume, recruiters in general)

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[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2475 posts
417 upvotes
Istillwanttodoit wrote:
Nov 11th, 2016 2:51 pm
Why you say no thanks bye? Why not just interview over skype? It is a face-to-face (as in you can see the candidates face) interview.
Commitment to the process. HR and hiring managers don't want to wait until the offer stage to find out candidates had a slight change of mind.

When someone says they will only fly upon offer, that's not a great sign of commitment...at all. A more reasonable approach is being ready to fly for final interviews.

Skype is okay for initial conversations.
Jr. Member
Jul 21, 2016
172 posts
7 upvotes
Hi BHRM,

Would a candidate that has a noticeable speech impediment, have less of a chance of being offered a sales/client facing type of position?

Feel free to be blunt.

Thanks
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2475 posts
417 upvotes
Yes/no.

Sorry honest answer. I have seen both.

I have seen someone with an impediment still make their way up the ranks and now in a lead role, does face clients. However this person speaks with confidence, has a presence in the room and can give effective presentations.


Istillwanttodoit wrote:
Nov 22nd, 2016 4:16 pm
Hi BHRM,

Would a candidate that has a noticeable speech impediment, have less of a chance of being offered a sales/client facing type of position?

Feel free to be blunt.

Thanks
Jr. Member
Jul 21, 2016
172 posts
7 upvotes
bhrm wrote:
Nov 22nd, 2016 4:32 pm
Yes/no.

Sorry honest answer. I have seen both.

I have seen someone with an impediment still make their way up the ranks and now in a lead role, does face clients. However this person speaks with confidence, has a presence in the room and can give effective presentations.
I always appreciate honest answers, thank you.

But would an individual who stutters, or has a lisp (sp?), be perceived less favorably than an equally qualified candidate who lacked a speech impediment?

Also would clients themselves actually care? (yes a broad question) .
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2475 posts
417 upvotes
Very very broad question, but if said individual speaks confidently, articulate and concisely, the issue seems minor. If said individual stutters and rambles and cannot convey ideas and thoughts.....then we're in trouble there.


Istillwanttodoit wrote:
Nov 23rd, 2016 8:11 pm
I always appreciate honest answers, thank you.

But would an individual who stutters, or has a lisp (sp?), be perceived less favorably than an equally qualified candidate who lacked a speech impediment?

Also would clients themselves actually care? (yes a broad question) .
Jr. Member
Jul 21, 2016
172 posts
7 upvotes
Approximately, how many applicants are there for a Staff Accountant position at a 1) small accounting firm 2)medium - large accounting firm in Toronto?



I decided to ask you this since you would be the most qualified individual to answer it on the entire forum.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2475 posts
417 upvotes
in the 100s!

Of the 100s, 60% are not even remotely close to being qualified (no education, no relevant experience, not even in the right city), 20% are overqualified, 20% are just right, 1% will get the job.

The problem is sites like indeed make it way too easy for applicants to just click and send resume. Throw in some more screening questions or steps, the number of applicants gets down to maybe 30-60....


Istillwanttodoit wrote:
Nov 25th, 2016 6:53 pm
Approximately, how many applicants are there for a Staff Accountant position at a 1) small accounting firm 2)medium - large accounting firm in Toronto?



I decided to ask you this since you would be the most qualified individual to answer it on the entire forum.
Jr. Member
Jul 21, 2016
172 posts
7 upvotes
bhrm wrote:
Nov 25th, 2016 8:03 pm
in the 100s!

Of the 100s, 60% are not even remotely close to being qualified (no education, no relevant experience, not even in the right city), 20% are overqualified, 20% are just right, 1% will get the job.

The problem is sites like indeed make it way too easy for applicants to just click and send resume. Throw in some more screening questions or steps, the number of applicants gets down to maybe 30-60....
Thanks for the reply.

Would you be able to give a more accurate figure? 600? 900?

Also, would you be able to describe who the 20% candidates who are "just right"? (in terms of experience and personality)
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 27, 2007
501 posts
64 upvotes
bhrm wrote:
Nov 25th, 2016 8:03 pm
in the 100s!

Of the 100s, 60% are not even remotely close to being qualified (no education, no relevant experience, not even in the right city), 20% are overqualified, 20% are just right, 1% will get the job.

The problem is sites like indeed make it way too easy for applicants to just click and send resume. Throw in some more screening questions or steps, the number of applicants gets down to maybe 30-60....
More steps? I would argue that the invasive application processes that exist today probably deter many of the qualified applicants from submitting resumes.

Also, why eliminate a candidate just because they are in a different city? Not necessarily directed at you, but if companies are complaining about lack of qualified applicants, you would think that the most obvious fix is to look outside of your city.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2475 posts
417 upvotes
I'd say anywhere from 100 to 300ish and at that point cutting off is a good idea...Have to turn off the tap somewhere!
Istillwanttodoit wrote:
Nov 26th, 2016 7:01 pm
Thanks for the reply.

Would you be able to give a more accurate figure? 600? 900?

Also, would you be able to describe who the 20% candidates who are "just right"? (in terms of experience and personality)
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2475 posts
417 upvotes
Legend24 wrote:
Nov 27th, 2016 2:43 pm
More steps? I would argue that the invasive application processes that exist today probably deter many of the qualified applicants from submitting resumes.

Also, why eliminate a candidate just because they are in a different city? Not necessarily directed at you, but if companies are complaining about lack of qualified applicants, you would think that the most obvious fix is to look outside of your city.
Unless they have an exceptional resume with particular skills, most applicants out of the city aren't even interested in commuting/relocating when asked or they say "upon offer"...Hiring managers do prefer those who live close to work as it makes a difference with commitment, work life balance, and performance.

I work 15 minutes from home now and I feel like a difference person!
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 7, 2007
2096 posts
395 upvotes
OP, could you please comment on this situation?

Sometimes recruiters contact me out of the blue, and invite me to apply to all these wonderful jobs, but the more we email each other, or talk on the phone, the more I realize that, 1.) It is not the right job for me, and 2.) the recruiter knows that it's a long shot, but still wants me to apply for the job.

Why would a recruiter do that? Is there something like a quote that recruiters have to meet? Like bringing at least 5 candidates for each posting they are working on?
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2475 posts
417 upvotes
1) If you feel it's not the right job for you, tell the recruiter or tell the recruiter prove otherwise, they might know something you don't. Maybe it's worth interviewing with their client? Maybe it's not.
2) They might be getting desperate or need a comparison or need to fill a deck to present to client. Client's don't like this anyways so I don't know why recruiters continue to do so. I rather present someone excited for the job and will interview well.
3) Check recruiter's credentials, if they're new to the game...they have no idea what they're doing. If they have good experience in the industry, maybe they know something you don't and you should hear them out.



motomondo wrote:
Nov 28th, 2016 12:35 pm
OP, could you please comment on this situation?

Sometimes recruiters contact me out of the blue, and invite me to apply to all these wonderful jobs, but the more we email each other, or talk on the phone, the more I realize that, 1.) It is not the right job for me, and 2.) the recruiter knows that it's a long shot, but still wants me to apply for the job.

Why would a recruiter do that? Is there something like a quote that recruiters have to meet? Like bringing at least 5 candidates for each posting they are working on?
Jr. Member
Jul 21, 2016
172 posts
7 upvotes
bhrm wrote:
Nov 28th, 2016 11:33 am
I'd say anywhere from 100 to 300ish and at that point cutting off is a good idea...Have to turn off the tap somewhere!
Thank you for the reply.

Would you be able to tell me how long it generally takes to reach 300 applicants? a) one day? b) two days? c) three days?
Sr. Member
May 14, 2009
598 posts
2 upvotes
Hi OP,
Would like to hear your insight on my situation..
I recently went for an interview recruiter had set up for me and received an offer and accepted.
Only reason I went for the interview was because recruiter convinced me this organization is growing and there is potential to transition into role I wanted.
My recruiter is very aware I wasn't interested in moving to another company for the same role.

1) I had interview for the same position I am currently in.
2) Strongly revealed my interest in eventually transitioning into another role to HR manager.
3) Received offer via recruiter and he had mentioned HR manager understands my career goals and has "plans" to transition me to new role after 3-6 months.

I had chance to talk to HR manager again to thank her for the offer and to discuss start date. I mentioned about the "plans" just to make sure we are on the same page. HR manager said she can't promise me anything nor she made any promises to my recruiter.

At this point I'm out of options as I have already accepted the offer. Unfortunately, I'm not 100% certain I have made right decision.
Is it possible to turn down offer at this point?

Much appreciated

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