Careers

Ask a Recruiter Anything (interview tips, resume, recruiters in general)

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 30th, 2018 12:53 pm
Tags:
None
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2625 posts
467 upvotes
renoldman wrote:
Aug 9th, 2017 11:09 am
What's your take on soft-landing candidates who are less than ideal.

I have heard the old "hiring manager is going on vacation" spiel many times.

Do you think it is underhanded to not tell a candidate who apparently isn't top of the top that they didn't get a position after an interview?

A friend heard that for the first time after a third interview three weeks ago and I didn't have the heart to tell him he didn't get it.
It is summer time so it happens a lot. I tend to tell people ahead of time that there will be a delay.

I am sometimes guilty of creating delay, but it's usually something going on in the background unforeseen and try to do my best to

1) Not look like an idiot
2) Not make the company/client look like an idiot
3) Be aware of candidates' concerns

I do not delay on purpose to be mean. End of the day, it's my name attached to the process and I really don't want people going "hey that bhrm person is a jerk!" even though it may not be me to blame. During the whole recruitment process, it comes back to me, success or failure.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2625 posts
467 upvotes
Bump!!

Almost forgot about this thread but remembered as I was chatting with a candidate in Montreal and RFD came up.
Sr. Member
Nov 3, 2011
971 posts
171 upvotes
STOUFFVILLE
bhrm wrote:
Apr 27th, 2018 3:10 pm
Bump!!

Almost forgot about this thread but remembered as I was chatting with a candidate in Montreal and RFD came up.
Since a lot of new grads scroll through the forums, I was hoping you can share some of your trade secrets. There are a few ways a company can source employees:

1) company hires a consultant company to source resources

2) company outsources the project to external company, but maintaining the business aspect and directions

3) company has an internal hr department in which they hire their own resources

In all of the above cases, what would be the clasues or terms you would advice to look out for? Or any specific contract phases which would become an instant red flags? An example would be something like.. an extremely prolonged resignstion period, or a non-compete clause.

There is probably more recruiters and outsourced hr in the GTA than any other industry, and I am sure this will give new grads/ existing candidates something to "watch out" for.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2625 posts
467 upvotes
ahhchoo wrote:
May 5th, 2018 1:00 am
Since a lot of new grads scroll through the forums, I was hoping you can share some of your trade secrets. There are a few ways a company can source employees:

1) company hires a consultant company to source resources

2) company outsources the project to external company, but maintaining the business aspect and directions

3) company has an internal hr department in which they hire their own resources

In all of the above cases, what would be the clasues or terms you would advice to look out for? Or any specific contract phases which would become an instant red flags? An example would be something like.. an extremely prolonged resignstion period, or a non-compete clause.

There is probably more recruiters and outsourced hr in the GTA than any other industry, and I am sure this will give new grads/ existing candidates something to "watch out" for.
Sorry missed this! Was on vacation in May and was swamped since then.

Red flags? Things to look out for?

Non compete is rarely enforced unless you're really going to be in a position where potential harm to your employer will be significant. This would be in very specialized or senior roles, client facing or building some book of business. If leaving your position to go to a direct competitor would cause financial risk or harm, non-compete agreements will certainly be enforced. Otherwise, it's generally there to scare people sometimes. You could argue, especially if your role is specialized within an industry that if not working for any competitor would affect your ability to earn an income at all, it can be reduced or negotiated.

Prolonged resignation period? Meaning notice period? Again it's just courtesy to go beyond 2 weeks, unless they're going to offer some sort of financial incentive for you to stay. You're not legally obligated unless you agreed.

New grads would very rarely be held against those things to be honest. The only things to "look out for" would be anything out of the ordinary like longer probation periods past 3 months, anything monetary, employers ability to retract or withhold pay unless there's a legitimate reason, "training fees" or unpaid training is an ugly common one. Excessive fees for "uniforms" or requiring to buy your own equipment. Little detail things.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2625 posts
467 upvotes
Bump! I just made a move, no longer in technology research but now....cannabis! Ask me anything about working in the cannabis industry!
Member
Nov 1, 2013
222 posts
25 upvotes
bhrm wrote:
Jul 19th, 2018 10:46 pm
Bump! I just made a move, no longer in technology research but now....cannabis! Ask me anything about working in the cannabis industry!
Please don't smoke out technology, you were a great help for many job seekers.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2625 posts
467 upvotes
Louking wrote:
Jul 23rd, 2018 11:32 am
Please don't smoke out technology, you were a great help for many job seekers.
Tech is great and I loved it, AI/ML and all. However cannabis is also up and coming especially this year, and Canada is poised to be a global leader. That's why I took the opportunity as a chance to be part of the pioneering in the industry.
Jr. Member
Dec 20, 2015
107 posts
14 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
Any tips on negotiating an offer? I know it's best to figure out your own market value first but I think I might be already overpaid for my current role (as I am quite young and inexperienced) but because I have some Fortune 500 experience, I feel that I could probably negotiate a bit? I've never tried before (would be jumping into my third perm FT job) and I'm a bit nervous.

Say I'm currently making 62k and they offer 70k, which is probably more than my market value(?). Do you think I should negotiate to 75k? Or should I state that I want 80k and hope they'll meet me in the middle for 75k? (Let's say the pay range for this job is 65-80k) This is for a Finance/Accounting/Operations role.

Edit: should I tell the recruiter my current salary? If they do ask, should I give them the total gross compensation (including the estimated bonus, etc.)? Are recruiters allowed to request for salary information from previous employers...?
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2625 posts
467 upvotes
Isshoukenmei wrote:
Oct 9th, 2018 11:49 pm
Any tips on negotiating an offer? I know it's best to figure out your own market value first but I think I might be already overpaid for my current role (as I am quite young and inexperienced) but because I have some Fortune 500 experience, I feel that I could probably negotiate a bit? I've never tried before (would be jumping into my third perm FT job) and I'm a bit nervous.

Say I'm currently making 62k and they offer 70k, which is probably more than my market value(?). Do you think I should negotiate to 75k? Or should I state that I want 80k and hope they'll meet me in the middle for 75k? (Let's say the pay range for this job is 65-80k) This is for a Finance/Accounting/Operations role.

Edit: should I tell the recruiter my current salary? If they do ask, should I give them the total gross compensation (including the estimated bonus, etc.)? Are recruiters allowed to request for salary information from previous employers...?
The question is why do you think you are worth $75k Or $80k? If you can't answer that question yourself or justify, you're not going to look very good or smart in front of the recruiter or hiring manager. $70 over $62 is more than a 10% bump. $75-80 might still be within their payband, but why should they get up there before knowing your actual on the job performance? If it's a great company and known for strong performance management tools and processes, and you know you're a strong performer, raises will come.

As for telling your recruiter your current salary, if they haven't asked then they probably have an idea how much you are at currently. It may help your case to justify an increase to move.
Sr. Member
Jan 1, 2013
897 posts
324 upvotes
Durham
I was off the an entire year, been resume pushing with no success. Many years in the Financial Industry including Account Management for software and insurance sales to Credit Unions across Canada.

During the year (Mar 17 - Mar 18) I decided to avoid applying at FI's as I wanted to become a mortgage agent, which I am now. So I've been applying for Account Management roles outside of FI's with no success.

My question is, is that year off a concern? Should I plug being a mortgage agent (which I was/am) to fill that void? Or is it a turn off to companies that I am doing something on the side and may conflict with any role I apply for?
Jr. Member
Dec 20, 2015
107 posts
14 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
bhrm wrote:
Oct 10th, 2018 8:08 am
The question is why do you think you are worth $75k Or $80k? If you can't answer that question yourself or justify, you're not going to look very good or smart in front of the recruiter or hiring manager. $70 over $62 is more than a 10% bump. $75-80 might still be within their payband, but why should they get up there before knowing your actual on the job performance? If it's a great company and known for strong performance management tools and processes, and you know you're a strong performer, raises will come.

As for telling your recruiter your current salary, if they haven't asked then they probably have an idea how much you are at currently. It may help your case to justify an increase to move.
Thanks! The reasoning behind my potential target of 75k comes from a rough average of the salaries/salary ranges that recruiters have given me throughout the past year when they tried recruiting me for various roles similar to the one I'm doing now. The reason why I've been getting those calls is because the company I was (am) working for was acquired by a very large Fortune 500 firm. This firm and their competitors are known to pay quite well, so I'm assuming that the recruiters who contacted me also assumed that I am being paid that much. (I am definitely paid less than my colleagues on the same level but I must admit, they did give me an inflated title)

Is 10% the normal increase that recruiters aim for? I haven't actually gone to an interview yet but I'm just trying to prepare myself for a potential counter offer/negotiation when it does happen. I did not counter nor negotiate my last two jobs/offers and I do regret it. The roles that recruiters have been presenting me with aren't of much interest to me (so far) but I'm considering applying for an interesting role that caught my eye recently. In terms of actual work experience and skills, I believe I am able to do this job well though.

Lastly, how important are years of experience? If the role is a management level position that requires 7+ years of experience, do you think they would care if I only had 5 years of experience even though I met most of the other requirements?
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2625 posts
467 upvotes
AHh, that typically happens when two companies merge or acquisition. Inequality between the new and the old.

10% is usually the amount to motivate someone to leave, or helps cover the 'cost' of leaving. It's coming close to December and some may leave behind year end bonuses.

As for years of experience, depends what line of work you are in and also most importantly how do you fit in the team from skills/experience and the salary you're asking for. If you're 5 years experience at $75k but someone else is 7-8 years at $70k....or your future team lead/supervisor is just at $78k...either they need to adjust everyone's pay or give you less. I've seen instances where companies had to give complete pay adjustments to keep up with market changes, 10-15% raise across the board for everyone.
Isshoukenmei wrote:
Oct 10th, 2018 11:30 pm
Thanks! The reasoning behind my potential target of 75k comes from a rough average of the salaries/salary ranges that recruiters have given me throughout the past year when they tried recruiting me for various roles similar to the one I'm doing now. The reason why I've been getting those calls is because the company I was (am) working for was acquired by a very large Fortune 500 firm. This firm and their competitors are known to pay quite well, so I'm assuming that the recruiters who contacted me also assumed that I am being paid that much. (I am definitely paid less than my colleagues on the same level but I must admit, they did give me an inflated title)

Is 10% the normal increase that recruiters aim for? I haven't actually gone to an interview yet but I'm just trying to prepare myself for a potential counter offer/negotiation when it does happen. I did not counter nor negotiate my last two jobs/offers and I do regret it. The roles that recruiters have been presenting me with aren't of much interest to me (so far) but I'm considering applying for an interesting role that caught my eye recently. In terms of actual work experience and skills, I believe I am able to do this job well though.

Lastly, how important are years of experience? If the role is a management level position that requires 7+ years of experience, do you think they would care if I only had 5 years of experience even though I met most of the other requirements?
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2625 posts
467 upvotes
Pick one and not both.

Working in FI and mortgage agent is definite no. Why not go back into Software sales?

Yes you need to explain the gap. Gaps are red flags to recruiters
Kkhan15 wrote:
Oct 10th, 2018 12:33 pm
I was off the an entire year, been resume pushing with no success. Many years in the Financial Industry including Account Management for software and insurance sales to Credit Unions across Canada.

During the year (Mar 17 - Mar 18) I decided to avoid applying at FI's as I wanted to become a mortgage agent, which I am now. So I've been applying for Account Management roles outside of FI's with no success.

My question is, is that year off a concern? Should I plug being a mortgage agent (which I was/am) to fill that void? Or is it a turn off to companies that I am doing something on the side and may conflict with any role I apply for?
Sr. Member
Nov 26, 2015
743 posts
453 upvotes
Ontario
HI bhrm

I am hoping for some advice and feedback on this. I am helping a family member get a job (basic minimum wage jobs). We applied for many jobs for a few weeks and got no response. Applied to an agency and then got something in a day or two.

Here is the situation:
-Went to agency for interview and was asked to fill out a bunch of forms. Turns out it was a bunch of registration forms to join them.
-The next day they said to come to the client job site for orientation. Job will begin the following monday.

1. That same next day, a bunch of job offers came in, 4 actually that were from NON-agency. So these jobs will be direct hire for full time. If we were to accept one of these and bail on the agency temp job, how does this work? We just email/call them and say bye?
2. The forms we signed with the agency and acceptance of the assignment, would we be in trouble should we bail 2 days before starting the temp job?
3. Talking about minimum wage jobs. What is the likely chance these employers would hire the temp within the 6 month contract period?

I hope you can give me insight on this. Also not trying to screw the agency over or anything. However we were searching more for something permanent, and closer to home then the one we were getting. FYI - we decided to stay with the temp offer and give it a chance, but I would still like to know what happens should we have taken the other path.

Thank you for your help

Top