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Ask your granite countertop questions here

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[OP]
Sr. Member
May 3, 2009
569 posts
45 upvotes

Ask your granite countertop questions here

Hello everyone. I joined this site because I see a few questions concerning granite and quartz countertops. Please feel free to ask any and all questions. There are no "stupid" questions here because this industry is full of lies and quite honestly, home owners can get quite confused very easily. When it comes to an investment such as this, it is worth the extra time to research a quality fabricator. I am simply here to let you know what you should get for a final product. Mark

Here is what should be expected when buying Granite, Marble, or Quartz

http://www.redflagdeals.com/forums/gran ... -a-741620/

Just remembered a place to see where some colleagues are who have the same quality in mind,

http://www.communitywalk.com/SFA

These collegues are a group of fabricators who help fabricators and I am proud to be a member. If any single member does not sell quality, we want to know. The group is called the Stone Fabricators Alliance (SFA)
946 replies
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 13, 2005
5670 posts
162 upvotes
GTA
How is the product, whether granite or corian, charged?? Per square foot or linear foot???

sk
Newbie
Apr 18, 2009
5 posts
I have granite countertop and is very easy to clean. Can I chop a whole chicken into pieces without damage it? or meat with bone?
[OP]
Sr. Member
May 3, 2009
569 posts
45 upvotes
SURRYARKO wrote:
May 4th, 2009 5:34 pm
I have granite countertop and is very easy to clean. Can I chop a whole chicken into pieces without damage it? or meat with bone?
Most material that is sold as granite, is not a true granite. With that said, most materials sold can hold up to a knife with no damage. The best thing to do is try cutting on a scrap piece, just to be on the safe side. The downfall to cutting on it is that you will dull your knife very quickly. Marbles, limestones, onyx, etc. is much softer than granite and will easily get marked with a knife. If your countertop is sealed correctly, there are no worries to be had as far as bacteria as long as you clean the surface properly. I tell people to still use a cutting board unless you like to constantly have your knives sharpened.
[OP]
Sr. Member
May 3, 2009
569 posts
45 upvotes
sunnybono wrote:
May 4th, 2009 4:55 pm
How is the product, whether granite or corian, charged?? Per square foot or linear foot???

sk
The pricing structure really depends on the individual business. You will find the production shops usually charge by the square foot. They can do this because they stock multiple slabs which means if your job takes 1.5 slabs, that is all they have to charge you for. Smaller shops tend to have to buy 2 slabs to do the same job so the cost is included in your price. Each job is different as is each company and the pricing structure they use.
Deal Addict
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Apr 2, 2006
1019 posts
2 upvotes
How can I tell if/when a granite countertop needs to be resealed? Is there something in particular I should be looking for? or just do it on a regular basis?

What would be involved in resealing a granite countertop and why does Quartz not have the same problem?

Thanks
[OP]
Sr. Member
May 3, 2009
569 posts
45 upvotes
circa76 wrote:
May 4th, 2009 6:03 pm
How can I tell if/when a granite countertop needs to be resealed? Is there something in particular I should be looking for? or just do it on a regular basis?

What would be involved in resealing a granite countertop and why does Quartz not have the same problem?

Thanks


Knowing when to seal your countertop is simple. All yo have o do is leave a wet rag in one spot for 10 minutes. If there is a dark spot left when you remove the rag, it needs to be sealed. This is the only time you seal. There are so many myths about sealer, it is sickening. Some granite needs to be sealed and some don't. Companies tell their clients to seal once or twice a year and it is unnecessary. As a guide, lighter stones seem to need more sealer and darker stones do not. The only way to know for certain is the rag test. As far as applying a sealer, most are as easy as wipe on and wipe off. There are good sealers and bad. Pay good money for an impregnating solvent based sealer. These sealers are a bit smelly due to the solvents, but are good for up to 5 years because they penetrate the surface approximately 2mm. A water based sealer is more work because it is a topical sealer that will wear off much faster. As for quartz, I do not have a lot of experience with it.
Deal Addict
Feb 7, 2006
1831 posts
479 upvotes
Hi,

In the process of having my kitchen templated and have a few questions.
I am using a above mount sink which is 35.5" x18". I want to use the sink as an undermount. My granite installer has offered to glue and tie the sink to the bottom.
I realize this will void any sink warrenty. He is comfortable doing the process. Are there other options?
Is it common/uncommon to put an underlay (plywood) on the cabinets first for 3cm or this a waste of time? Is it more common for 2cm.

Thankyou for the help.
[OP]
Sr. Member
May 3, 2009
569 posts
45 upvotes
MMMM wrote:
May 4th, 2009 6:54 pm
Hi,

In the process of having my kitchen templated and have a few questions.
I am using a above mount sink which is 35.5" x18". I want to use the sink as an undermount. My granite installer has offered to glue and tie the sink to the bottom.
I realize this will void any sink warranty. He is comfortable doing the process. Are there other options?
Is it common/uncommon to put an underlay (plywood) on the cabinets first for 3cm or this a waste of time? Is it more common for 2cm.

Thankyou for the help.
There is no problem undermounting a top mount sink. With a sink this size, mechanical fasteners of some sort should be used for long term benefits. If silicone alone is used it stands a chance of dropping away from the granite. Your installer can get these but will likely add a small charge for it, but it is a guarantee that the sink will never fall. An underlay is unnecessary with a 3cm material and not always needed for a 2cm material. It really comes down to the way it is installed. Some use it for extra support on 2cm. I use 2" wide plywood strips for a build up and have never had an issue. I prefer strips so I can shim the countertop properly.
Member
Jan 21, 2008
291 posts
68 upvotes
Hi, Thanks for opening this thread I'm sure it will be a big help to everyone here.

I am building an outdoor kitchen/ wood fired oven with counter tops at my cottage and was probably going to go with a granite counter top if the price is right. Would granite stand up to the up north weather and temperature. I was also just going t use odds and ends pieces, how would I go about purchasing these. Thanks
Deal Addict
User avatar
Apr 20, 2006
1575 posts
278 upvotes
Toronto
Thanks for the thread, hope it'll be as successfull as the hardwood floor and gardening advice threads.

I've a nice, big verde/ green butterfly dining table with 2-3 minor chips on the surface , not cracks or broken off pieces, rather as if someone gouged at it with a screwdriver or nail, doesn't affect in any other way except cosmetically, is there a simple way to fill those holes.

Also , what is the best way to clean a shower stall made up of large granite tiles all around including roof and smaller size ones on the floor. Thanks again!!
Newbie
Apr 18, 2009
5 posts
Thank for your answer since I have this question on my mind all the time. But if I use a heavy weight wooden chop board on top of the granite countertop would that be ok?.


Thanks
[OP]
Sr. Member
May 3, 2009
569 posts
45 upvotes
wronguy wrote:
May 4th, 2009 8:26 pm
Hi, Thanks for opening this thread I'm sure it will be a big help to everyone here.

I am building an outdoor kitchen/ wood fired oven with counter tops at my cottage and was probably going to go with a granite counter top if the price is right. Would granite stand up to the up north weather and temperature. I was also just going t use odds and ends pieces, how would I go about purchasing these. Thanks
The main concern with using granite outside will be the sun. Darker granites will likely become unusable in the sun. You will likely be able to fry eggs it can get so hot. Also, the expansion and contraction can create cracks.This can happen with light colored stones too. The best thing to do is place a scrap piece in the oven for a while to see how it handles heat. It will handle the cold temperatures of winter. The thing to look at is any laminated edges. If a normal polyester adhesive is used, it stands a chance of "popping" off with freeze thaw conditions. The polyester adhesives also are not UV protected. The best adhesive for this application would be a true epoxy (Touchstone TES epoxy, ask your fabricator). This epoxy holds in these conditions and is UV stable. As far as odds and ends, talk to a fabrication shop and they will likely sell some to you for cheap. Most sizes will likely be vanity size, approximately 24"x48". They would likely give scraps away just so it doesn't cost them to dispose of it.
[OP]
Sr. Member
May 3, 2009
569 posts
45 upvotes
loonie wrote:
May 4th, 2009 11:21 pm
Thanks for the thread, hope it'll be as successfull as the hardwood floor and gardening advice threads.

I've a nice, big verde/ green butterfly dining table with 2-3 minor chips on the surface , not cracks or broken off pieces, rather as if someone gouged at it with a screwdriver or nail, doesn't affect in any other way except cosmetically, is there a simple way to fill those holes.

Also , what is the best way to clean a shower stall made up of large granite tiles all around including roof and smaller size ones on the floor. Thanks again!!
WARNING-READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE USING CA. HEALTH HAZARDS ARE POSSIBLE
Minor chips are easily filled with CA(cyano acrylate), and accelerator which is available at hobby stores. First, you must look at the chips and see if there is going to be a color difference (usually lighter). To hide it, you will need a black pigment (black marker) to darken the areas. Let the marker fully dry and wipe off the excess with your finger. Use masking tape around the area and fill with a medium CA. Now be extremely careful not to get any CA on yourself or any furnature as it will bond faster than crazy glue....don't ask me how I know :6cheesygri Fill the chips and smooth flush to the masking tape with a razor blade. Use very little accelerator as too much can turn the CA white. The uring process only takes a few seconds. If you see smoke coming from the CA once you use the accelerator, stand back very fast as this smoke is Hydrogen Cyanide. It will bring tears to your eyes instantly and steal your breath away. Once cured, remove masking tape. Take a razor blade at 90 degrees to the surface and scrape back and forth until all CA is flush with the surface. It may take a few razor blades as CA is very hard. Once flush, rub with your finger until it is shiny. The repair will be very difficult to detect.

If your shower walls have a soap and residue build up, you should get a quality(expensive) PH neutral heavy duty cleaner and follow the directions. You can also try some super fine steel wool and elbow grease. The best way to avoid any build up on the tiles is to give them a quick wipe with the towel after use. A few seconds now can save you time in the long run.
[OP]
Sr. Member
May 3, 2009
569 posts
45 upvotes
SURRYARKO wrote:
May 5th, 2009 12:28 am
Thank for your answer since I have this question on my mind all the time. But if I use a heavy weight wooden chop board on top of the granite countertop would that be ok?.


Thanks
A chopping board will save your knives. As long as your installer did a proper job of shimming any low spots, I can't see any issues arising. Just make sure you stay away from the front and rear rails of your sink or cooktop. Those are the only weak areas of your kitchen.
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