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Bait-and-switch final interview

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 8th, 2017 2:09 am
Deal Addict
Sep 23, 2009
3978 posts
1143 upvotes
I have heard that going from Analyst at one company to Manager at another is difficult.

This thread has another 2 instances that confirm this.

Being suitable for a managerial role versus a technical (analyst) role boils down to the different job levels requiring different sets of skills.

If you really want to make the move, I think you will have a better chance if you can get your current employer to give you that opportunity than another company.

Good Technicians (Analysts) rarely make good Managers and asking another company to give you that shot to make the jump is in my opinion, a waste of your time.

If you are looking outside to make the move, I think it is rational for a prospective employer to think you are disappointed with your current work situation. If that's the case, maybe you will move if given the right things. Could be better pay, shorter commute, awesome cafeteria, new environment, etc.

I can understand being frustrated with the "bait and switch", but I think if you realize that the different job levels require vastly different skills ..... you should realize that you never really had a shot at the managerial position.

I mean, do you honestly think an analyst position and the manager position require the same skillset to be successful?
Last edited by renoldman on Dec 2nd, 2017 3:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Addict
Sep 23, 2009
3978 posts
1143 upvotes
I digress at this point because I could go on about how 20 years experience as a PSW in public sector does not equate to you being suitable to be a CEO of a corporation.

But at this point, I think that's just part of the intellectual honesty that is lost when you join the public sector. They actually believe that the years make you suitable.

(Considering to delete this before I have to hear how I am wrong and that 20 years of technical work makes you suitable to be the CEO of Google and Microsoft .... so government workers deserve the same pay.)
Deal Addict
Nov 22, 2009
2092 posts
349 upvotes
Toronto
renoldman wrote:
Dec 2nd, 2017 3:45 pm
I have heard that going from Analyst at one company to Manager at another is difficult.

This thread has another 2 instances that confirm this.

Being suitable for a managerial role versus a technical (analyst) role boils down to the different job levels requiring different sets of skills.

If you really want to make the move, I think you will have a better chance if you can get your current employer to give you that opportunity than another company.

Good Technicians (Analysts) rarely make good Managers and asking another company to give you that shot to make the jump is in my opinion, a waste of your time.

If you are looking outside to make the move, I think it is rational for a prospective employer to think you are disappointed with your current work situation. If that's the case, maybe you will move if given the right things. Could be better pay, shorter commute, awesome cafeteria, new environment, etc.

I can understand being frustrated with the "bait and switch", but I think if you realize that the different job levels require vastly different skills ..... you should realize that you never really had a shot at the managerial position.

I mean, do you honestly think an analyst position and the manager position require the same skillset to be successful?
Well everyone needs to start from somewhere. If he never apply for manager positions, then he will never be a manager.
Newbie
Jul 1, 2017
97 posts
48 upvotes
blitzforce wrote:
Dec 4th, 2017 3:28 pm
Well everyone needs to start from somewhere. If he never apply for manager positions, then he will never be a manager.
The struggle is real; just don't give up - that's my honest advice.

Leverage your current employer to learn the skill-sets required to be competitive for management level roles; it is not easy, but the only real way to move into management is either through internal promotions or external applications. I went from Analyst to Manager and it was a breath of fresh air.
Jr. Member
Feb 19, 2017
151 posts
66 upvotes
marc_t wrote:
Dec 1st, 2017 6:52 pm
yeah sure w/e
you must be one of those HR types
Do you even know what bait and switch means?
Must have been dropped as a baby or something...
Deal Addict
Apr 21, 2014
1152 posts
289 upvotes
Alberta
Walch1102 wrote:
Dec 4th, 2017 6:01 pm
Do you even know what bait and switch means?
Must have been dropped as a baby or something...
bait-and-switch
noun
the action (generally illegal) of advertising goods that are an apparent bargain, with the intention of substituting inferior or more expensive goods

Bait and switch can loosely be applied here as a generic term, where the candidate was baited with a manager position and then it switched to an inferior analyst position.

Had the analyst role been advertised the OP wouldn’t have even applied.
Jr. Member
Feb 19, 2017
151 posts
66 upvotes
abc123yyz wrote:
Dec 4th, 2017 6:28 pm
bait-and-switch
noun
the action (generally illegal) of advertising goods that are an apparent bargain, with the intention of substituting inferior or more expensive goods

Bait and switch can loosely be applied here as a generic term, where the candidate was baited with a manager position and then it switched to an inferior analyst position.

Had the analyst role been advertised the OP wouldn’t have even applied.
It just sounds like none of you have had experience hiring people at a large corporation. We often have multiple positions open and often offer people a lower position than they were applied to. It was not with the intention of tricking them but because the candidate was not at the level we wanted but we still felt compelled to hire them because of fit and potential. OP clearly said they asked first. He could have said no and they would have just considered him for the manager role, albeit with a lower likelihood of success.
Deal Addict
Apr 21, 2014
1152 posts
289 upvotes
Alberta
Walch1102 wrote:
Dec 4th, 2017 7:11 pm
It just sounds like none of you have had experience hiring people at a large corporation. We often have multiple positions open and often offer people a lower position than they were applied to. It was not with the intention of tricking them but because the candidate was not at the level we wanted but we still felt compelled to hire them because of fit and potential. OP clearly said they asked first. He could have said no and they would have just considered him for the manager role, albeit with a lower likelihood of success.
Agreed. Missed the part where they asked first.

As a side note, I have worked at companies at a manager level or above at a 1 billion, 5 billlion and 130 billion dollar company. When I hire I usually can tell from the resume if they are a candidate for another position and have HR tell them BEFORE agreeing to an interview.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 15, 2005
5150 posts
684 upvotes
Walch1102 wrote:
Dec 4th, 2017 7:11 pm
It just sounds like none of you have had experience hiring people at a large corporation. We often have multiple positions open and often offer people a lower position than they were applied to. It was not with the intention of tricking them but because the candidate was not at the level we wanted but we still felt compelled to hire them because of fit and potential. OP clearly said they asked first. He could have said no and they would have just considered him for the manager role, albeit with a lower likelihood of success.
I hire at a massive corporation and know that the bait and switch is real.

Whenever we post a job we have internal discussions about position level, expected pay etc. As soon as there is a good candidate I see executives start to lowball them with lower titles and salaries than previously discussed.
Jr. Member
Feb 19, 2017
151 posts
66 upvotes
Ziggy007 wrote:
Dec 6th, 2017 11:24 am
I hire at a massive corporation and know that the bait and switch is real.

Whenever we post a job we have internal discussions about position level, expected pay etc. As soon as there is a good candidate I see executives start to lowball them with lower titles and salaries than previously discussed.
So...you work at a massive corporation but somehow executives are involved in low level hiring decisions? Interesting.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 15, 2005
5150 posts
684 upvotes
Walch1102 wrote:
Dec 6th, 2017 8:40 pm
So...you work at a massive corporation but somehow executives are involved in low level hiring decisions? Interesting.
Yes, my management team likes to have final say.

Often I interview with HR present and when I find a suitable candidate and make a recommendation they are called back for a second interview with upper management. During this arrangement they often throw out lower than expected terms for the position to see if the preferred candidate will bite on them
Jr. Member
Feb 19, 2017
151 posts
66 upvotes
Ziggy007 wrote:
Dec 6th, 2017 11:39 pm
Yes, my management team likes to have final say.

Often I interview with HR present and when I find a suitable candidate and make a recommendation they are called back for a second interview with upper management. During this arrangement they often throw out lower than expected terms for the position to see if the preferred candidate will bite on them
Are we talking about actual executive officers or just mid-level managers with massively inflated titles? At RBC for example, there are only 10 real executives. They aren't even involved in most director or VP hires.

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