Automotive

BC raising speed limits caused..

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 14th, 2018 10:27 pm
Tags:
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jun 19, 2001
7520 posts
1212 upvotes

BC raising speed limits caused..

A huge increase in injuries and claims

https://vancouversun.com/news/politics/ ... shes-study
"All of the pro-speed arguments, like the one that people were already driving over the speed limit, have been disproven in this research. The pro-speed advocates who’ve lobbied for speed limit increases have based their view on crappy data at the time. The mistake should be admitted and speed rolled back because, from a safety point of view, it was the wrong decision,” he said."


So for the many claims here of "should raised speed limits like BC", hopefully we've heard enough.
44 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 10, 2015
1868 posts
610 upvotes
Monte Creek, BC
I fully agree with that article. Traveling Hwy 5, the Coquihalla, more than a dozen times a year, I've seen more than my share of accidents. Raising the maximum speed from 110 to 120 on the entire highway was idiotic. Though now they have some sections where the maximum speed may be lowered, if conditions warrant.
The snowshed hill, which hits an 8.5% grade, still has 120 as the posted speed.
Prior to the speed being raised from 110, most people drove 110 to 120. Now with it at 120, they are upping their speed to 125 to 130.
This is a high, mountain highway with ever-changing weather conditions and most people don't adjust.

A year and a half ago I was on this highway, April 2, and cruising along just below 120 when I saw a snow squall ahead and slowed down. Pretty well every other car blew by me and went into that squall at 120 or more. When I hit it I came across several cars spinning out of control, with one upside down in the median, it's wheels still turning. I wanted to stop and help but the cars kept coming, still not slowing. As it turned out, there was a fatality, someone who got out of their car and were hit.

120 is just too fast on winding, mountain roads.
Diversity is Our Burden
Member
Jun 2, 2009
223 posts
46 upvotes
Not to take away from the lives lost, but raising the limit to 120 on mountain roads just seems like poorly thought out (to put it nicely). Flat roads? Maybe ....

Another thing is also to trying to go faster than what common sense allows (ie not driving to conditions)
Last edited by poker838 on Oct 11th, 2018 11:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Fanatic
Oct 6, 2007
6329 posts
2438 upvotes
Kootenays
poleman wrote:
Oct 10th, 2018 1:33 pm

A year and a half ago I was on this highway, April 2, and cruising along just below 120 when I saw a snow squall ahead and slowed down. Pretty well every other car blew by me and went into that squall at 120 or more. When I hit it I came across several cars spinning out of control, with one upside down in the median, it's wheels still turning. I wanted to stop and help but the cars kept coming, still not slowing. As it turned out, there was a fatality, someone who got out of their car and were hit.

120 is just too fast on winding, mountain roads.
I drove it 8 times last year, including during a pretty good storm in March. You're right, drivers either don't adjust for the conditions (I'm talking to you 4X4 drivers that think you're invincible) or almost as bad, slow down to 40 kph because they've come from the lower mainland and don't have winter tires, just M+S. Mixing the 2 is a recipe for disaster. At least there's the variable speed signs now, which does help a bit.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Jun 12, 2003
14565 posts
1005 upvotes
Markham
Poor example to prove a point
ShadowVlican
Deal Expert
User avatar
Nov 15, 2004
15938 posts
2176 upvotes
Toronto
How was the crash cited in that paragraph related to speed? It was related to transport trucks running off the road in the snow and crashing into buses and cars. That happens here, too.
Could HAVE, not could OF. What does 'could of' even mean?
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 24, 2007
13023 posts
1604 upvotes
Hold on....so, if the roads are wet and slippery, you are suppose to slow down?
Deal Expert
User avatar
May 10, 2005
31374 posts
6046 upvotes
Ottawa
Piro21 wrote:
Oct 10th, 2018 6:22 pm
How was the crash cited in that paragraph related to speed? It was related to transport trucks running off the road in the snow and crashing into buses and cars. That happens here, too.
Yeah, they have a TV show about that. Highway to Hell?
In the 21st Century deleting history has become far more important than making it. Anonymous
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Sep 21, 2010
9834 posts
1792 upvotes
Montréal
poleman wrote:
Oct 10th, 2018 1:33 pm
I fully agree with that article. Traveling Hwy 5, the Coquihalla, more than a dozen times a year, I've seen more than my share of accidents. Raising the maximum speed from 110 to 120 on the entire highway was idiotic. Though now they have some sections where the maximum speed may be lowered, if conditions warrant.
The snowshed hill, which hits an 8.5% grade, still has 120 as the posted speed.
Prior to the speed being raised from 110, most people drove 110 to 120. Now with it at 120, they are upping their speed to 125 to 130.
This is a high, mountain highway with ever-changing weather conditions and most people don't adjust.

A year and a half ago I was on this highway, April 2, and cruising along just below 120 when I saw a snow squall ahead and slowed down. Pretty well every other car blew by me and went into that squall at 120 or more. When I hit it I came across several cars spinning out of control, with one upside down in the median, it's wheels still turning. I wanted to stop and help but the cars kept coming, still not slowing. As it turned out, there was a fatality, someone who got out of their car and were hit.

120 is just too fast on winding, mountain roads.
They set a speed limit and that's only going to be a 'baseline' for many drivers to speed even faster.
Many ppl are not skilled enough or have much sense. Just recently during a major rainstorm here some drivers were still speeding like crazy even though couldn't see more than 2 car lengths ahead. If these are the vehicles that flipped over, screw them.

Poor innocent dude that got killed trying to help these idiots.
The richest 1% of this country owns half our country’s wealth, 5 trillion dollars, one-third of that comes from hard work, two-thirds comes from inheritance, interest on interest accumulating to widows and idiot sons, and what I do.. <find the rest>
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jan 7, 2007
19933 posts
3813 upvotes
Poormond Hill
The good thing about that speed limit was that you didn't need to use your brakes often to maintain speed going down. My Corolla would settle at 120-125kmph without touching the gas pedal. Saved me a lot of brakes.
A life spent making mistakes is not only more memorable, but more useful than a life spent doing nothing.
Deal Addict
Jul 7, 2017
1111 posts
363 upvotes
SW corner of the cou…
Get to drive the Coquihalla today.....

For the incident where someone trying to help on the Coquihalla a couple of years ago, one woman said she crashed because of a blind spot (this may have been the same one, or just before - there were several that made the news i a short period). There are no blind spots on that highway unless you're driving a lot faster than the posted speed and/or in very poor visibility.

https://www.castanet.net/news/BC/193382 ... up-icy-hwy

And yes, you do see a lot of 4WDs off the road when there's any snow and/or ice. People also don't realise gravity ain't your friend when going downhill.

The other one is the Malahat highway leading north of Victoria. Lots of idiots going way too fast. B.C. needs speed-averaging radar cams......
Almost too cheap to shop through RFD
Newbie
Mar 20, 2011
96 posts
36 upvotes
Langley, BC
poker838 wrote:
Oct 10th, 2018 1:40 pm
Not to take away from the lives lost, but raising the limit to 120 on mountain roads just seems like poorly thought out (to put it nicely). Flat roads? Maybe ....
I'm in favour of higher limits, but the roads they decided to raise the limits on were some strange choices, I agree. For example, Highway 1 between the Port Mann Bridge and Langley is fully lit, divided, wide, mostly flat and has great visibility, but the limit is set to 100kph. Most people drive at 120kph, sometimes 130kph in ideal conditions. What is crazy is once you get out towards Chilliwack, where there are no barriers, no street lighting, and the road is narrower, they increase the limit to 110kph!

My theory is it became political - they wanted to universally raise limits, but were afraid of voter blacklash/think of the children etc., so just did it in lower-population areas.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 24, 2007
13023 posts
1604 upvotes
Wondering if this video had anything to do with the speed limit increase?

Member
Aug 26, 2018
356 posts
269 upvotes
What's the hurry anyway? Most of the time, people who drive fast are in no time constraint nor have deadlines to meet. They will arrive at their destination 10 min faster than driving at the limit. Now what? Slack off in their office of course. Or stand in line at the restaurant checking their phones. But they would have used a hell of a lot more gas due to fuel inefficiency at those higher speeds to get to their destination needlessly faster than they really have to.

Most cars are most fuel efficient at around 75 km/hr The drag force is also proportional to the squared of the velocity. Which means the faster you go, the bigger the penalty is to your efficiency when drag becomes a huge factor in reducing MPG.

With my car, if I drive at 80km/hr I can coast the 401 with around 7 L/100km. If I drive at 90 km/hr it goes to 8L/100km. If I drive at 100 km/hr it is 8.5L/100km. Thats a huge difference. Ideally, if not for road rage, I'd drive at 80km/hr all day everyday. That fuel savings is huge, especially since i have to pump premium. It amounts to hundreds of dollars a year difference.

Liberals always talk about carbon tax carbon tax carbon tax. They should maybe focus on people's driving habits. Forcing people to use their cars at optimal fuel efficiency will do much more good to the environment than simply taxing fuel while people continue to drive at 120km/hr well above the speed limit and using up more fuel than they need for the distance traveled because their car is less efficient. They should be lowering the speed limit.

Top