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becoming a CBSA Officer

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  • Jan 11th, 2019 6:44 pm
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Newbie
Aug 30, 2014
48 posts
9 upvotes
Vancouver
tritium4ever wrote:
Oct 25th, 2014 10:25 pm
Where are you getting these numbers from? The collective agreement says CX-1 starts at 56k, while the FB-2 starts at 58k.

The CX-1 pay scale sure ramps up faster than FB-2 though.
Pay for Correctional Officer 1:
Year 1 - $ 55970
Year 2 - $ 59329
Year 3 - $ 62888
Year 4 - $ 66660
Year 5 - $ 70663

Pay for Correctional Officer 2:
Year 1 - $ 59398
Year 2 - $ 62962
Year 3 - $ 66739
Year 4 - $ 70742
Year 5 - $ 74985
Deal Addict
Feb 26, 2003
4079 posts
104 upvotes
Tahsis
Respect101 wrote:
Oct 25th, 2014 7:02 pm
2 OT shifts per month will get us almost 100k.
That does not sound insane to me.

$85k as explained in my earlier post.
$520 per OT = $12,500

$97,500 not bad only 2 OT shifts per month
I meant the people making 100k in OT, not 100k total.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 1, 2003
1616 posts
101 upvotes
Scarborough
Respect101 wrote:
Oct 25th, 2014 11:56 pm
Pay for Correctional Officer 1:
Year 1 - $ 55970
Year 2 - $ 59329
Year 3 - $ 62888
Year 4 - $ 66660
Year 5 - $ 70663
Yeah, those are the numbers I was seeing. 70k base pay, but only after 5 years. A new hire would "only" be getting 56k a year. Of course once you factor in OT...
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Member
Oct 13, 2014
224 posts
12 upvotes
QC
adamtheman wrote:
Sep 1st, 2014 6:05 pm
+1

Even better, Sheriff's department (courts).
Do you have the links to apply for these posts?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Feb 10, 2007
2696 posts
287 upvotes
bandolera wrote:
Sep 1st, 2014 10:09 am
Been watchin Border Security on NGC for the past few weeks and just wondering if this line of job promises security, career enjoyment and whatnot.

Also, is this a good job for married women who have kids or plan to have kids?
There are many married women on the job who have kids. They will usually say that you miss out a lot on family/friends due to the rotating shifts. There is job security and career enjoyment if you enjoy catching idiots and also helping people.
You will realize how much garbage there is in society once you get on the job, which is why many officers are jaded. The majority are all extremely nice people and probably the best you'll have the privilege of working with.
BlackJays wrote:
Mar 13th, 2010 6:02 pm
shame has been acheived
Newbie
Feb 10, 2015
3 posts
Toronto
Hi...I'm a newbie here, I have submitted my resume and passed for firearm courses, should I take the PARE myself? Or wait for the recruitment team to call me? Thanks!
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Apr 16, 2006
5994 posts
403 upvotes
tritium4ever wrote:
Sep 1st, 2014 10:30 pm
Contacts are done entirely through email. You sure you didn't miss your invitation to do the interview or psychological assessment? 85% should be plenty to see you through to the next round.

But yeah, the testing is rough. Apparently the majority of applicants fail one (or both) of the tests, the number I've heard bandied around is that fewer than 20% of applicants make it through the testing stage. Based on the number of people I saw at the subsequent psychological assessment, 20% might even be generous.
The competition is fierce, for sure.

I actually applied to be a CBSA officer about 10 or so years ago. I went to the testing center (about 1 1/2 hours away at the time) and I wrote the test along with probably ~750-~1000 other people at the same time. Many of these people are screened out at the written testing point.

The test itself is challenging (as opposed to say, difficult). If I recall correctly (and it has been a while) it consisted primarily of your ability to make accurate observations in an extremely short period of time. As a CBSA officer, the reality of your job is that you will be spending at most a couple minutes with each person that goes through the border, and some of these people may be travelling on things other than a Canadian passport (dual citizens, non-citizens). Some of these people have warrants out for their arrest out of Canada/US/Int'l and are fleeing the country....and some of these people are completely innocent travelers who happen to bear an uncanny resemblance to some of these people. Your ability to recall and observe will help keep the border moving smoothly while ensuring public safety and security. There's also a math component to the test.

I made it as far in the process as being asked to get my PAL (firearm's license). At the time, I had 0 interest in this so I dropped out of the competition.

If you're interested, apply, write the test, and see where the chips fall and go from there.
Member
Mar 14, 2015
267 posts
169 upvotes
Octavius wrote:
Feb 14th, 2016 12:38 pm
The competition is fierce, for sure.

I actually applied to be a CBSA officer about 10 or so years ago. I went to the testing center (about 1 1/2 hours away at the time) and I wrote the test along with probably ~750-~1000 other people at the same time. Many of these people are screened out at the written testing point.

The test itself is challenging (as opposed to say, difficult). If I recall correctly (and it has been a while) it consisted primarily of your ability to make accurate observations in an extremely short period of time. As a CBSA officer, the reality of your job is that you will be spending at most a couple minutes with each person that goes through the border, and some of these people may be travelling on things other than a Canadian passport (dual citizens, non-citizens). Some of these people have warrants out for their arrest out of Canada/US/Int'l and are fleeing the country....and some of these people are completely innocent travelers who happen to bear an uncanny resemblance to some of these people. Your ability to recall and observe will help keep the border moving smoothly while ensuring public safety and security. There's also a math component to the test.

I made it as far in the process as being asked to get my PAL (firearm's license). At the time, I had 0 interest in this so I dropped out of the competition.

If you're interested, apply, write the test, and see where the chips fall and go from there.
I too wrote the test about 10 years ago and passed it, however they weeded me out at the interview stage, which was held at the area office in Mississauga at the time.

It is a lot like other government positions; highly bureaucratic and competitive in the selection processes, but with more steps and clearances involved, due to the security and enforcement element of the job.

I would recommend to the OP that they research the job to see if it is truly what they want, and just do the testing and see what happens. There's nothing to lose, really.
Deal Addict
Mar 27, 2004
2863 posts
377 upvotes
Toronto
Any job where you have to deal with the public on a constant high volume basis, you will become jaded.
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Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 1, 2003
1616 posts
101 upvotes
Scarborough
KittyCat1234 wrote:
Feb 13th, 2016 12:25 am
Hi...I'm a newbie here, I have submitted my resume and passed for firearm courses, should I take the PARE myself? Or wait for the recruitment team to call me? Thanks!
Don't worry about the PARE until after you've done the written testing. There's really no point to having it done early, unless other law enforcement jobs you're applying to also need PARE. Be glad they don't also make you get first aid certification like they did in the past. :)

All CBSA contact will be through email, and the process is not quick. Written testing happens in big waves (twice yearly, in any given region), so you could be waiting up to six months just to take the written test if you apply right after one has occurred. Be prepared to wait weeks or months for subsequent stages. Don't put your life on hold for a CBSA application.
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Deal Addict
May 28, 2005
2047 posts
143 upvotes
a close friend of mine started his deployment last June in Saint Johns. He has lots of interesting stories to tell. But yea there's basically a lottery to determine where you will be posted.
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Newbie
Feb 10, 2015
3 posts
Toronto
Wilmega wrote:
Feb 15th, 2016 8:32 am
a close friend of mine started his deployment last June in Saint Johns. He has lots of interesting stories to tell. But yea there's basically a lottery to determine where you will be posted.
Thanks Tritium!

Wilmega: for each post how often he can go back to his home city ? How far from his home to his work place?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 1, 2003
1616 posts
101 upvotes
Scarborough
KittyCat1234 wrote:
Feb 17th, 2016 12:38 am
Wilmega: for each post how often he can go back to his home city ? How far from his home to his work place?
You will need to relocate to wherever you're posted. This could be Toronto, or this could be Little Gold Creek, the northern-most land border crossing in Canada (just getting to work from the nearest town is a 90km drive one way...they don't call it "Top of the World Highway" for no reason).

CBSA makes it very clear that you must agree to be posted anywhere in Canada. A couple years ago when I was in the recruitment process I signed a relocation agreement at the written test and again at the interview. Up until a year or so ago you had a choice of postings based on your performance at Rigaud (top marks would give you first choice of the available postings, second best would give you second choice, and so on). Apparently they had issues with that since they'd end up with all the lower scoring graduates at the "bad" postings, so now it's just a random lottery. Expect to have to relocate.

I'll stress that I'm not a CBSA officer. These are just things I've learned going through the recruitment process and talking to others who have done it.
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Member
User avatar
Jul 12, 2006
381 posts
17 upvotes
What does the security clearance involve?

Apart from this, there are different levels of clearances - does anyone know what they look into for each one?
Deal Fanatic
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Apr 16, 2006
5994 posts
403 upvotes
When I applied a while back, it was "secret" security clearance.

It involves going back 10 years of your life in painstaking detail...where you lived, where you worked (every single job, no matter how minor), and a credit check. They'll also ask you if you've been fired from a job during that time period, and if so, to provide particulars.

It's a major PITA if you hop around from place to place during the time frame in question.

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