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[OP]
Newbie
Nov 14, 2014
42 posts
2 upvotes
Ottawa, ON

Bell Fibe install

I am moving into to my first home at the end of June and am trying to determine what to do about tv, internet etc. Currently I am with Rogers but would like to add home phone and would prefer Bell for this. From a pricing standpoint I can get a better price with Bell and get FIBE TV although I am nervous about the installation. It sounds like the current owners currently have Rogers for TV and I am terrified of having new wiring running along the baseboards. I don’t really understand the technical jargon from the Bell site but just saw that it is possible that may need to wire along baseboards (which would look awful). Ultimately is it likely they will need to rewire anything or do they basically plug in where the Rogers cable currently comes in? The house is a 2003 build if that means anything.

Ultimately, I want to have a TV on the main floor and in the basement. Both spots have cable outlets currently and upstairs there is a phone jack right beside the cable outlet which I believe they need to use. Would I still be able to plug a phone into this jack if it is also being used for TV/internet? Is it likely the install would be clean with no wires running along baseboards or holes put into walls?
27 replies
Deal Addict
May 16, 2012
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The only difference between Bell and Rogers wiring is what comes to your home. To simplify things for easier understanding, the Bell tech will run a home phone wireline to your home (if you already have one you are good), while Rogers will run the coax. Once either is connected to their modem, it is coax cables that will be run through your house.

Meaning, if you already have your cabling done for Rogers, Bell will use those same lines and there is no need for any additional work.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 26, 2014
5219 posts
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Toronto
jbsquash wrote:
May 20th, 2015 9:20 am
I am moving into to my first home at the end of June and am trying to determine what to do about tv, internet etc. Currently I am with Rogers but would like to add home phone and would prefer Bell for this. From a pricing standpoint I can get a better price with Bell and get FIBE TV although I am nervous about the installation. It sounds like the current owners currently have Rogers for TV and I am terrified of having new wiring running along the baseboards. I don’t really understand the technical jargon from the Bell site but just saw that it is possible that may need to wire along baseboards (which would look awful). Ultimately is it likely they will need to rewire anything or do they basically plug in where the Rogers cable currently comes in? The house is a 2003 build if that means anything.

Ultimately, I want to have a TV on the main floor and in the basement. Both spots have cable outlets currently and upstairs there is a phone jack right beside the cable outlet which I believe they need to use. Would I still be able to plug a phone into this jack if it is also being used for TV/internet? Is it likely the install would be clean with no wires running along baseboards or holes put into walls?

My bell Fibe setup is in my bedroom. The phone line is all that is used from my house to bring the signal into the fibe home hub.

out of that, my ethernet cable goes to desktop in my room and in the hallway. the rest is wireless. oh and one ethernet cable to the main HD PVR in my room which is beside the home hub, and one to the wireless transmitter for the additional Fibe Boxes which just also sits near the home hub / hd pvr in my room.

the other outlets? the fibe box plugs into the power socket, and thats it, its wireless.

Fibe TV has no lines in the house.. I don't think that the jack itself will be usable, there are 2 phone jacks on the home hub but i think thats for some voip crap and doesnt work with a regular phone ... i just had them setup my phone lines to every other jack in the house.

way less cables w/ wireless fibe receivers. only if you use ethernet for internet from hub -> computer, and than obviously from the hub to main PVR + wireless transmitter box there is an ethernet. these also have their own power cords of course.
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Aug 11, 2008
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Euro2012 wrote:
May 20th, 2015 9:43 am
The only difference between Bell and Rogers wiring is what comes to your home. To simplify things for easier understanding, the Bell tech will run a home phone wireline to your home (if you already have one you are good), while Rogers will run the coax. Once either is connected to their modem, it is coax cables that will be run through your house.

Meaning, if you already have your cabling done for Rogers, Bell will use those same lines and there is no need for any additional work.
Completely wrong. I had Fibe installed in my apartment. They did NOT use existing coax. It is 2 different systems between Fibe and Rogers. The bell people had to physically run wiring (cat 5 or cat 6) from the phone outlet to each room that needed a fibe box . I opted not to do this and had the wireless boxes installed instead.
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Jul 26, 2014
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Euro2012 wrote:
May 20th, 2015 9:43 am
The only difference between Bell and Rogers wiring is what comes to your home. To simplify things for easier understanding, the Bell tech will run a home phone wireline to your home (if you already have one you are good), while Rogers will run the coax. Once either is connected to their modem, it is coax cables that will be run through your house.

Meaning, if you already have your cabling done for Rogers, Bell will use those same lines and there is no need for any additional work.
everything you said here is wrong, from my understanding. Bell fibe does not use coax cable. anywhere along the system.
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May 16, 2012
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willdacanucker wrote:
May 20th, 2015 9:49 am
Completely wrong. I had Fibe installed in my apartment. They did NOT use existing coax. It is 2 different systems between Fibe and Rogers. The bell people had to physically run wiring (cat 5 or cat 6) from the phone outlet to each room that needed a fibe box . I opted not to do this and had the wireless boxes installed instead.
Every person I knows has coax running from their modem to their tv with Bell services including myself. If you look at any Bell digital box, you will see a coax input. Never heard of someone running cat 5 and I am not sure what would be the point.
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May 16, 2012
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Financials wrote:
May 20th, 2015 9:50 am
everything you said here is wrong, from my understanding. Bell fibe does not use coax cable. anywhere along the system.
I have Bell Fibe services at my home and have coax running to my PVR (the other two boxes are wireless). You guys shouldn't be so quick with giving advice if you are not familiar with the service, it is counter productive for people seeking advice.
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Aug 11, 2008
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Euro2012 wrote:
May 20th, 2015 10:00 am
I have Bell Fibe services at my home and have coax running to my PVR (the other two boxes are wireless). You guys shouldn't be so quick with giving advice if you are not familiar with the service, it is counter productive for people seeking advice.
So even though I had coax in my whole place running to every bedroom, the bell guy was just being an arse and wanted to spend many more hours working on one install and running cabling he did not need to do. I get it now. The guys dont get paid per job after all. The get paid by linear mile of wiring they install. :rolleyes:
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Deal Guru
Jul 19, 2012
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Montreal
it's probably due to region/agreement whether bell is allowed to use existing coax or pipe their own ethernet. existing houses would probably use coax, while condos/apartments or brand new houses may have contractual arrangements with a certain provider, which means bell needs to lay their own lines.
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May 16, 2012
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willdacanucker wrote:
May 20th, 2015 10:06 am
So even though I had coax in my whole place running to every bedroom, the bell guy was just being an arse and wanted to spend many more hours working on one install and running cabling he did not need to do. I get it now. The guys dont get paid per job after all. The get paid by linear mile of wiring they install. :rolleyes:
Hah, could be true. This is how my installation went. He said he was "here". Then I watched him play on his phone for an hour in his truck. Then he looked around the house and went out again. Back in an hour. Hooked everything up in about ten minutes since everything was done already as I previously had Rogers. Then he said he needs to boost the signal outside (back to his truck for another hour of phone play). Then he came back, activated everything an that was it. Total time: almost 6 hours.
Tome of actual work: 30mins (and I am being generous here)
Deal Addict
Aug 29, 2011
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It may be that the tech had concerns over the quality/condition of the existing coax and in order to prevent an irate customer callback, he simply ran new ethernet.
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May 16, 2012
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JackWhyte wrote:
May 20th, 2015 10:06 am
it's probably due to region/agreement whether bell is allowed to use existing coax or pipe their own ethernet. existing houses would probably use coax, while condos/apartments or brand new houses may have contractual arrangements with a certain provider, which means bell needs to lay their own lines.
Never thought about this, but it seems right.
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 14, 2014
42 posts
2 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
Okay so how exactly is the PVR connected to the system? If I want the PVR on the main floor is my modem, telephone jack etc all used on this floor or is it something like they bring the signal in through the phone line and connect a thing in the basement. The PVR is then connected by the cable outlet which is coax and the modem can be put upstairs in the office where the desktop is. Just trying to figure out what all needs to be wired together by the TV etc. I think there is just the one phone jack on the main floor which is where we would ideally want at least one of the phones, sort of sucks if we can't use the jack they use.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 26, 2014
5219 posts
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Toronto
Again.

Telephone wire in my bedroom -> that goes to Home Hub. Ethernet from Home Hub to PVR + Wireless Receiver Transmitter thingy.

Other than that, no wires except power cables for the boxes.

I get 30/11 on my 25/10 plan. never ever slows down, tv is fast and the menu doesnt lag, never have issues.

not sure why you would need coax through the house when the boxes are wireless

every other jack in my house is live for a regular phone line. plug in and go.

took 2 hours to install everything, no problems with the tech he was in and out and the signal strength is fine on all tvs.

the Main PVR needs to be in the same area as the HOme Hub Modem, or you need to run a long enough ethernet cord to wherever you want it. That specific phone line jack will be blocked from use, so you cant have a phone beside the home hub / main pvr.

PVR and home hub can be placed on any outlet you desire, i chose my room so i can run my ethernet here for main desktop and the rest is wireless, i put the receiver transmitter outside my bedroom door and run an ethernet to that to help the signal to the basement a bit.

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