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Deal Expert
Feb 29, 2008
15278 posts
1617 upvotes
Montreal
willdacanucker wrote:
May 20th, 2015 10:06 am
So even though I had coax in my whole place running to every bedroom, the bell guy was just being an arse and wanted to spend many more hours working on one install and running cabling he did not need to do. I get it now. The guys dont get paid per job after all. The get paid by linear mile of wiring they install. :rolleyes:
The coax needs to be shielded and of a minimal quality.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Oct 14, 2010
714 posts
253 upvotes
Fibe TV (and Internet) enters your home over the phone line. Every jack in a modern home is wired for two phone lines ( line #1= red/green, Line #2=yellow/black, The plugs on a phone cord are normally designed to just connect to the line #1 pins of the jack) ). The installer will place a filter (acts as a splitter) at the demarcation point of your home. This filter will allow your regular phone line to go to every jack in the house as it always has, and he will connect the Internet (DSL signal) to the second pair which will also go to every jack in the house.

You decide which room you wish the Home Hub to be installed in (anywhere there is a phone jack). He will replace the single phone jack in that room with a dual wall jack. You can plug your phone into one jack and the Home Hub into the other.

The Home Hub contains 4 LAN ports much like a regular router. It also contains a coaxial output called the HPNA port which for this purpose is just an additional LAN port.

You need to connect the primary receiver/PVR using a cable to the Hub. You can plug it into one of the 4 LAN ports using CAT5 cable, or you can place it in another location and connect it by using coaxial cable to the HPNA port.

The secondary receivers can be connected with CAT5 to the Hub if your home is pre-wired for Internet, or they can be connected wirelessly. The installer will connect the wireless access point (WAP) to one of the 4 LAN ports on the Hub using CAT5. I cannot see any degradation in quality using WiFi so you should have no concern using WiFi rather than CAT5.

If you also subscribe to Internet you will connect your PC to one of the remaining LAN ports, or connect your own router to one of the LAN ports and setup your own network.

The system is very flexible. I wanted to have the HUB installed in my 2nd floor office so that I can monitor the status lights, and connect my Asus router to it. I placed the primary PVR in my entertainment unit on the first floor and connected to the hub using an existing coax on the HPNA port. The WiFi AP is also located in the 2nd floor office and has no problem communicating with 3 additional receivers including one in the basement.

With the WiFi receivers you can access your PVR on the patio with only an AC receptacle required.
Jr. Member
Nov 26, 2006
112 posts
2 upvotes
Sorry to revive an old thread. I've signed up for Fibe (TV and Internet) and home phone. My install will be later this month. Does anyone know if its possible to have the home hub 2000 placed on the 3rd floor (through a builder rough-in Cat5e) and then have the home phone be in the basement. I need the home phone line in the basement since the alarm system would need to wired to it. I'm concerned about having the home hub 2000 in the basement corner (front) and having good wifi in the top back bedroom of the house. Any thoughts/advice would be good.

Also - do you know if Bell would finish off the cat5e connections? The builder just did the rough-ins.
Newbie
Jun 16, 2016
67 posts
6 upvotes
MIT wrote:
Aug 2nd, 2016 8:58 am
Sorry to revive an old thread. I've signed up for Fibe (TV and Internet) and home phone. My install will be later this month. Does anyone know if its possible to have the home hub 2000 placed on the 3rd floor (through a builder rough-in Cat5e) and then have the home phone be in the basement. I need the home phone line in the basement since the alarm system would need to wired to it. I'm concerned about having the home hub 2000 in the basement corner (front) and having good wifi in the top back bedroom of the house. Any thoughts/advice would be good.

Also - do you know if Bell would finish off the cat5e connections? The builder just did the rough-ins.
I had bell fibe installed into a new home just in July. He didn't use the rough in cables at all, he installed the fibe connection to my breaker box in the basement and then ran the proper cables to install the home hub on the main floor.
He did give me some options on where to install it. hope that helps
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 13, 2014
1632 posts
207 upvotes
MIT wrote:
Aug 2nd, 2016 8:58 am
Sorry to revive an old thread. I've signed up for Fibe (TV and Internet) and home phone. My install will be later this month. Does anyone know if its possible to have the home hub 2000 placed on the 3rd floor (through a builder rough-in Cat5e) and then have the home phone be in the basement. I need the home phone line in the basement since the alarm system would need to wired to it. I'm concerned about having the home hub 2000 in the basement corner (front) and having good wifi in the top back bedroom of the house. Any thoughts/advice would be good.

Also - do you know if Bell would finish off the cat5e connections? The builder just did the rough-ins.
A DSL modem connects to the WAN using a telephone line. You need a phone line in order to connect your modem to the internet.

HH2000 has it's own built-in router (which is trash, get your own ASAP) which is what the 4 ethernet LAN ports are for. Also, you're just doing damage to your signal having it further away from the demarc.

1. Set up your HH2000 in the basement and connect it to a POTS splitter. One cable from the POTS splitter goes to the modem, the other goes to the punchdown distribution unit to send the phone line to all the phone jacks in your house.
2. Take the main coax that connects all the coax outlets in your house and connect it into your HH2000
3. Run a single ethernet cable from the HH2000 to your main floor where you will connect your own router (turn off all gateway features on the HH2000. You cannot bridge it you can only put it in PPPoE passthrough mode)
4. Connect your phones to any phone jacks in the house and it will work
5. Connect your PVR to any coax jack in the house and it will work

Basically the only thing you have to do is run a single ethernet cable. Everything else is likely already wired by the home builders.
Jr. Member
Nov 26, 2006
112 posts
2 upvotes
Thanks Curtoph and MayorOfToronto.

Curtoph - do you utilize the built in wifi of the home hub or do you use your own router/AP. If you don't mind me asking - how large is your home.

I'm not sure if this changes things, but it will be FTTH. From what I understand

1. There is an ONT (for the fibre)
2. The home hub 2000 has to be conencted to it
3. Coax or Ethernet can be run to the pvr (coax exist to where I want the pvr)
4. Home phone would need to be connected to the hub as well.

I'm struggling with how they will put the ONT near the breaker, and then the hub 2000 where ever I want (say 3rd floor or main sloor), but still have coax go back to the basement as well as the line for the phone. This is my reference point http://i39.tinypic.com/r7obco.jpg

If Bell is able to connect the hub though my builders cat5e rough-in, it would solve my problems, so that I can place my own wifi router on the 3rd floor and keep everything else in the basement.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 13, 2014
1632 posts
207 upvotes
MIT wrote:
Aug 2nd, 2016 4:46 pm
Thanks Curtoph and MayorOfToronto.

Curtoph - do you utilize the built in wifi of the home hub or do you use your own router/AP. If you don't mind me asking - how large is your home.

I'm not sure if this changes things, but it will be FTTH. From what I understand

1. There is an ONT (for the fibre)
2. The home hub 2000 has to be conencted to it
3. Coax or Ethernet can be run to the pvr (coax exist to where I want the pvr)
4. Home phone would need to be connected to the hub as well.

I'm struggling with how they will put the ONT near the breaker, and then the hub 2000 where ever I want (say 3rd floor or main sloor), but still have coax go back to the basement as well as the line for the phone. This is my reference point http://i39.tinypic.com/r7obco.jpg

If Bell is able to connect the hub though my builders cat5e rough-in, it would solve my problems, so that I can place my own wifi router on the 3rd floor and keep everything else in the basement.
The home phone will be its own line hence the POTS splitter (unless Bell finally has VoIP?). I don't know how Bell's FTTH works but I'm guessing they use copper from the ONT right?

Also, this is why I and most would recommend keeping the HH2 in the basement cabinet where all the coax and telephone jack end points are. HH2 has a decent WiFi but nothing beats a solid standalone router. Nothing. Also, for optimal whole home coverage you want to keep the router in the middle of the house. People think the signal falls around the home in a dome shape but that isn't true. It's omnidirectional meaning it goes in every single direction out of the antenna. Hence, middle of the house is best for all around coverage.

Edit: just took a look at your picture. I had no idea they have the node in the house and it converts to ethernet. I thought they kept the node outside in place of the demarc point and sent the cable in as good old 2 pair copper. That definitely changes things. Someone with FTTH help him out
Jr. Member
Mar 6, 2013
142 posts
15 upvotes
Sorry to bring this old thread up again, but I am switching from Bell Fibe to Fido (Rogers). I previously had Rogers, so I thought I could just use the
My Bell Internet (and the PVR) are both connected using the coax cable, and when I connect the Fido modem I got to either, it isn't working (I'm still subscribed to Bell), don't they both use the coax cables? it seems that way
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 24, 2003
11888 posts
900 upvotes
Toronto
You want to use your Bell PVR with Fido?
Sr. Member
User avatar
Oct 14, 2010
714 posts
253 upvotes
I'm not sure if this is what you are asking, but here I go anyway.........

Bell Fibe has an option to connect the HomeHub modem/router to the PVR with coaxial cable. Both the HomeHub and the PVR have female "F" connectors, which is the typical cable TV connector. These cable connections on each device are labelled as HPNA.

You cannot connect a cable from your Cable TV provider into an HPNA port and expect to view any TV shows.

I hope that was your question.
Newbie
Apr 4, 2017
8 posts
I know I'm rehashing an old thread.

I have Rogers for home internet, thinking of switching to Bell Fibe for internet only. How does the in-house wiring work for Bell. The house has the "rough in " phone wiring and coax cable wiring.

To switch to Bell, do they need to run new cabling within the home? Can the use the existing Coax throughout the home?

I've tried talking to Bell but they have no idea.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 13, 2014
1632 posts
207 upvotes
realtycoon wrote:
Jul 17th, 2017 8:26 am
I know I'm rehashing an old thread.

I have Rogers for home internet, thinking of switching to Bell Fibe for internet only. How does the in-house wiring work for Bell. The house has the "rough in " phone wiring and coax cable wiring.

To switch to Bell, do they need to run new cabling within the home? Can the use the existing Coax throughout the home?

I've tried talking to Bell but they have no idea.
DSL internet doesn't run on coax. I'm assuming you don't have FTTH which means you have copper telephone lines coming to your house. They will use one of the pairs to connect your internet. From inside your house, you just plug that telephone line into the back of your modem. That's all.

The only issue you'll run into is where you want to place your modem and whether you have home phone or not. If you're good with fishing cables then you can just run a telephone line from the basement to wherever you want to place your modem. What I would personally do is keep the modem in the basement and just run an Ethernet cable to a third-party router somewhere in the middle of your house.


By the way, I'd STRONGLY suggest you go with Teksavvy or start.ca as you will receive the EXACT same service for a fraction of the price. You can get the same speed with unlimited bandwidth for substantially less than what Bell would charge.

Trust me, if you know what's good for you.. you will stay away from dealing directly with Bell unless you're willing to deal with billing issues every single month.
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