Computers & Electronics

Bell/Rogers pitching Canadian ISP mandatory site-blocking scheme to CRTC

  • Last Updated:
  • May 15th, 2018 2:26 pm
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Hiredgoon416 wrote:
Jan 31st, 2018 11:50 pm
Hey, can I get Hulu , Vudu , YouTube TV, HBO now (properly) , etc etc etc etc etc? No, no I can't. I am willing to pay, but the services are not available due to these companies and the CRTC. Until then, pirate.

Also, anyone who is totally black and white on this...is setting up monopolies, false advertising, outright stealing from customers, and manipulation of the government really legal?
Fyi, CRTC does not control content blocking.

Read https://crtc.gc.ca/eng/internet/musi.htm

Why is content blocked?

Like many Canadians, you probably watch movies and TV shows, and listen to music online, using a computer, tablet or smartphone. But when the content you want isn’t available because of geoblocking, it can be frustrating. And it’s not something the CRTC controls.

Geoblocking is a way of restricting what you can view or listen to online based on your geographic location. It is used to limit access to films, TV shows, and music based on copyright and licensing requirements.

For example, if a Canadian broadcaster pays a fee to air a program or musical selection in Canada, and the website where you are watching or listening to the content hasn’t bought those same rights, then you won’t be able to access the content on that site. It doesn’t matter where the site originates; if you are in Canada, and the site hasn’t bought Canadian rights, then the content may be geoblocked in your location.

In Canada, services that broadcast or stream content online don't need a licence. Whether you can view or listen to content on a site is based on distribution rights.
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Meh, VPN will skirt any crap shoot restrictions they put on customers. This would be precedent setting if they’re allowed to block certain content.
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tk1000 wrote:
Jan 31st, 2018 8:43 pm
Innovation, Science and Economic Development (ISED) minister reaffirms commitment to net neutrality in response to anti-piracy group
https://betakit.com/navdeep-bains-reaff ... acy-group/

“Our government supports an open internet where Canadians have the ability to access the content of their choice.”
I grazed through the newswire article and read a few of the comments industry workers stated...

Several of them have 0 clue about how piracy works from the sounds of it. Some are arguably valid and some are just outrageous. One that said:

"TV content providers in Canada will soon be put out of business by the serious streaming piracy problem. The regime proposed by the coalition is an efficient system to require ISPs to disable access to infringing streams. It is an effective means to address the piracy problem and it should be established as soon as possible." - Desmond Chan, Deputy General Manager, Legal and International Operations, Television Broadcasts Limited (TVB)
Be put out of business? I doubt it, there's too many people paying outrageous fees already, give me a break. TV stations run way too many ads right now to not be raking in some serious $. It is an effective means to address piracy? Maybe if you block our connections to direct streams via an android box. But then a new method will come out. I actually hardly use my android box anymore due to poor quality video and crappy connections. Alternate methods are better if you know what you are doing.

All that really needs to be said is this

"VPN /thread" I highly doubt it will be made illegal to use a VPN in the future.
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shikotee wrote:
Jan 31st, 2018 5:47 pm
Image

You wouldn't download a car?!!

Hell yeah I would. If I could wave a wand and replicate your car, and not actually deprive you of your car in the process.

This is a major conflict of interest, and is why we need structural separation.
Running the pipes should never have an interest in what travels the pipes.
This is common sense.
I'd download a car if I could...

speaking of, this article I linked below relates to that picture and how the music was only supposed to be played at a specific festival, then later the creator found his music had been re-used in many movies without him being paid. I mean how much more stupid can these anti-piracy advocates get...:

http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/ ... wsanalysis&


also


https://gizmodo.com/the-eu-suppressed-a ... 1818629537
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Won't be long until you could actually download a car. We should see it in our lifetime.




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Jun 4, 2013
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StreamingFan wrote:
Jan 31st, 2018 8:13 am
Paying for Internet doesn't give you the right to access illegal sites. If you're streaming something free that is supposed to be paid for, it's not legal, and that includes all these bullshit IPTV sites that you do pay for. It's common sense.
Guess what I do access BT sites and sometimes I don't download anything coz nothing interest me. Also some artist, Small movies makers do put their music/movies on bt sites for free access. So you are telling me I can't even download those even though it is 100% legal? Are you telling me I can not access content put out by artist and movie maker that's legal.

Sorry by paying for internet give me access to everything that's on the internet it is up to the police/FBI/CIA etc etc etc to shut down illegal websites not the ISP provider because their motivation is very different law enforcement.
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Sending a Different Message: After Bell Website Blocking Coalition Warns About Cord Cutting, Bell CEO Says It Isn’t Accelerating
http://www.michaelgeist.ca/2018/02/bell ... ntmessage/
For example, CEO George Cope stated:

So IPTV, I think, was also – I think, we’ve reviewed a strong with 32,000 net adds and was our best quarter for satellite TV since Q2 2014, where we saw an improvement this year in losses of 30%. Overall, we added 11,000 new TV subscribers in our wireline footprint, and we also continue to see an acceleration in the rates of decline of NAS losses. So 34% less customers on last year left us, and in fact, for another quarter, I think, that’s four quarters in a row, in our fiber footprint, we’ve actually had positive NAS growth.

In other words, Bell is adding subscribers and overall declines are slowing down. In fact, Cope noted Internet streaming was a key source of growth:

Crave strategy continues to work for us number of customers up 22% year-over-year, allowing us to have a product that you can view through traditional linear TV or and over-the-top environment.
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StreamingFan wrote:
Jan 30th, 2018 10:21 pm
Rogers or Bell are simply protecting material they have broadcast rights to in Canada. I'd much rather you go the route of accessing say, US Netflix, to get some of this material. At least then you'd be paying for it. Pirating is wrong.
Why do you consider it ok to access US Netflix here in Canada?
Netflix buys the right for each content in their respective territories, if the movie or TV show isn't offered here, someone else paid for tge rights to distribute it here, you are still pirating it. This is the same thing as getting an IPTV, none of them have the right to provide their contents here
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NoCountry4RFDer wrote:
Feb 14th, 2018 12:27 pm
Why do you consider it ok to access US Netflix here in Canada?
Netflix buys the right for each content in their respective territories, if the movie or TV show isn't offered here, someone else paid for tge rights to distribute it here, you are still pirating it. This is the same thing as getting an IPTV, none of them have the right to provide their contents here
My physical location may be in Canada but my digital location is in USA. How can you tell me I'm not digitally in the USA?

That's not even remotely close to the same as pirating. I've paid for Netflix. I've paid for a VPN. According to Netflix I am in USA. What am I stealing from Netflix, my content provider? How is that similar to stealing cable?

In case you didn't know... the internet doesn't have borders. And I'll be damned if I let some of the worst corporations in this country tell me otherwise. They don't care about you. Stop feeling sorry for them.

If they want to stay relevant then they need to change the way they do business. Point blank. Period.
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MayorOfToronto wrote:
Feb 14th, 2018 12:36 pm
My physical location may be in Canada but my digital location is in USA. How can you tell me I'm not digitally in the USA?

That's not even remotely close to the same as pirating. I've paid for Netflix. I've paid for a VPN. According to Netflix I am in USA. What am I stealing from Netflix, my content provider? How is that similar to stealing cable?

In case you didn't know... the internet doesn't have borders. And I'll be damned if I let some of the worst corporations in this country tell me otherwise. They don't care about you. Stop feeling sorry for them.

If they want to stay relevant then they need to change the way they do business. Point blank. Period.
I'm pro Net Neutrality and don't care about how people are getting their movies/tv shows but if someone wants to complain about people using IP TV and torrents so yes, accessing US Netflix is the same thing as accessing IP TV, none of them paid for the content to be distributed in Canada

If Bell owns the rights of the contents you are watching from Netflix US AND if you consider watching IP TV is stealing, so yes, you are stealing from Bell by watching it from US Netflix
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MayorOfToronto wrote:
Feb 14th, 2018 12:36 pm
My physical location may be in Canada but my digital location is in USA. How can you tell me I'm not digitally in the USA?

That's not even remotely close to the same as pirating. I've paid for Netflix. I've paid for a VPN. According to Netflix I am in USA. What am I stealing from Netflix, my content provider? How is that similar to stealing cable?

In case you didn't know... the internet doesn't have borders. And I'll be damned if I let some of the worst corporations in this country tell me otherwise. They don't care about you. Stop feeling sorry for them.

If they want to stay relevant then they need to change the way they do business. Point blank. Period.
You are violating Netflix's 'Terms of Use'
https://help.netflix.com/legal/termsofuse

4.3. You may view the Netflix content primarily within the country in which you have established your account and only in geographic locations where we offer our service and have licensed such content. The content that may be available to watch will vary by geographic location and will change from time to time. The number of devices on which you may simultaneously watch depends on your chosen subscription plan and is specified on the "Your Account" page.
[OP]
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Deja vu all over again. There should be an archive of these repetitive arguments somewhere.

But regarding the particular question of evading geoblocking, it's not illegal in Canada or anywhere else, and governments don't want to get tangled up in it because it's too similar to buying grey market goods while bypassing the authorized local distributor.
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Oct 27, 2007
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The conflict of interest reigning within the CRTC has been going on for a long time. The government/CRTC/big telecom companies collusion has persisted for many years yet people keep forgetting this.

They work in 'stages' or progress gradually but the ultimate quest is to screw the consumer and increase profits and that means less competition, less choice and crappier 'experiences' and use of your tech. gadgets and services. The CRTC, governments and big business collude together.

https://mobilesyrup.com/2017/07/18/crtc ... tt-canada/
http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/ian-sco ... -1.4210590
https://www.itworldcanada.com/article/i ... man/394932
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2017/07/18 ... _23035969/
https://www.bnn.ca/ian-scott-to-take-ov ... 5-1.807591
http://www.dslreports.com/shownews/New- ... xec-118086
http://www.capilanocourier.com/2017/11/ ... oligopoly/

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