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Best college for computer programming?

Deal Expert
Oct 6, 2005
16492 posts
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mathiewannabe wrote:
Apr 21st, 2015 11:56 pm
this. you don't need formal education. there are tons of resources available as we speak from top universities and they're free.
if you can showcase your work and skills via real life examples, that's going to be better than any degree/diploma you can get.
This may work for a start-up, but it will be very hard for an established tech company unless you're a superstar. It's not practical in the real world - especially for your first job.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Feb 5, 2011
185 posts
8 upvotes
no math courses, program looks a bit too easy to me
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Oct 26, 2003
29371 posts
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ssharm02 wrote:
Apr 22nd, 2015 7:25 pm
no math courses, program looks a bit too easy to me
remember, if it's easy, then it is not worth doing
Member
Sep 30, 2012
305 posts
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Hamilton
inmyturret wrote:
Apr 21st, 2015 8:23 pm
I never stated that college grads were inferior to university grads (I'm not going to open that can of worms). I am just trying to make the point that the curriculum is at least 3-4 years behind the technologies used by industry. This really surprised me when doing interviews.
Once again I find it the other way around, community colleges in general tend to be up to date with technology because their aim is to pump out graduates that are more hands-on oriented with relevant technology in the working force today. University however is more academic and theory oriented rather than hands-on. There's a reason why colleges mostly focus on things like Web/Desktop/Mobile/Database subjects and work with the likes of Java, C#, PHP, Javascript, SQL, etc. Because they expect their graduates to be able to know these things in the working force where they're commonly used. University on the other hand has a completely different approach, and it's a theory mathematical one in general where they expect you to go out of your way to learn the other stuff. To elaborate on this, I checked out the course descriptions for Waterloo Computer Science here:

https://cs.uwaterloo.ca/current/courses ... criptions/

It seems like most of the program revolves around Python, C++, C, Unix, Matlab, Functional programming, and a bit of Java. The approach is obvious, they want to pump out graduates that will go out there and create rather than maintain. You may say well that's certainly better and I agree, based on the book cover your average university grad is likely more knowledgeable than your average college grad. The problem is the majority of development jobs out there are not complex enough to require that kind of thinking, and a college learning is more than sufficient enough to get it done.
If a college student doesn't make the effort to go into more depth than the curriculum offers, they will have trouble getting the type of job they are hoping for when entering school. We hire both coop students and new grads. One quick course in Linux doesn't teach coop students enough for them to be successful during the short period of time they will spend with our company. We want to teach them useful workplace skills (like you said, multitasking and working under tight deadlines), not basic programming skills.
The same rule applies for University grads, if they don't make the effort to go out of their way to learn things they will not become successful in the workforce, and that involves thinking outside the box and simplifying their approach.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Feb 5, 2011
185 posts
8 upvotes
damn this is so tight I cant make up my mind. I have narrowed it down to Computer science @ York U (I only have to take the core math and com science classes there) they gave me credits for the GE courses. And the Sheridan software development and network engineering program that DTscript posted.

Not liking the Seneca program at all, way too basic imo and not math at all. I dont like programs with zero math. I need to start in september, I am already so late!! >_<

DT your posts are very informative. Thank you

edit: I am wondering if i should bother with UofT Mississauga?
Member
Jun 26, 2010
475 posts
52 upvotes
I've heard from various people that the York U CS program isn't very rigorous. If you can be able to get into UofT, I'd go with that over York U. Plus it seems you are really wedded to the math & theory aspects of CS ... that's even more reason to get into UofT as you will be exposed to leaders in the field.
Newbie
Sep 2, 2013
12 posts
18 upvotes
DTscript wrote:
Apr 23rd, 2015 6:37 pm
Once again I find it the other way around, community colleges in general tend to be up to date with technology because their aim is to pump out graduates that are more hands-on oriented with relevant technology in the working force today. University however is more academic and theory oriented rather than hands-on. There's a reason why colleges mostly focus on things like Web/Desktop/Mobile/Database subjects and work with the likes of Java, C#, PHP, Javascript, SQL, etc. Because they expect their graduates to be able to know these things in the working force where they're commonly used. University on the other hand has a completely different approach, and it's a theory mathematical one in general where they expect you to go out of your way to learn the other stuff. To elaborate on this, I checked out the course descriptions for Waterloo Computer Science here:

https://cs.uwaterloo.ca/current/courses ... criptions/

It seems like most of the program revolves around Python, C++, C, Unix, Matlab, Functional programming, and a bit of Java. The approach is obvious, they want to pump out graduates that will go out there and create rather than maintain. You may say well that's certainly better and I agree, based on the book cover your average university grad is likely more knowledgeable than your average college grad. The problem is the majority of development jobs out there are not complex enough to require that kind of thinking, and a college learning is more than sufficient enough to get it done.



The same rule applies for University grads, if they don't make the effort to go out of their way to learn things they will not become successful in the workforce, and that involves thinking outside the box and simplifying their approach.
Very well said by DTScript. I totally agree.
Newbie
Sep 2, 2013
12 posts
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ssharm02 wrote:
Apr 23rd, 2015 7:10 pm
damn this is so tight I cant make up my mind. I have narrowed it down to Computer science @ York U (I only have to take the core math and com science classes there) they gave me credits for the GE courses. And the Sheridan software development and network engineering program that DTscript posted.

Not liking the Seneca program at all, way too basic imo and not math at all. I dont like programs with zero math. I need to start in september, I am already so late!! >_<

DT your posts are very informative. Thank you

edit: I am wondering if i should bother with UofT Mississauga?
I am a computer programming student at Seneca and have almost finished the program. The program at Seneca is pretty good as it gives you exposure to different kind of programming languages. But if you prefer Sheridan, I guess that's okay too. One piece of advice that I want to tell you is to that no matter which school you go to, make sure you are in a co-op program. Your degree/diploma is only valuable if you are getting work experience from co-op.
Member
Sep 30, 2012
305 posts
42 upvotes
Hamilton
JasonF wrote:
Apr 23rd, 2015 8:59 pm
I am a computer programming student at Seneca and have almost finished the program. The program at Seneca is pretty good as it gives you exposure to different kind of programming languages. But if you prefer Sheridan, I guess that's okay too. One piece of advice that I want to tell you is to that no matter which school you go to, make sure you are in a co-op program. Your degree/diploma is only valuable if you are getting work experience from co-op.
Completely agree, the bold part should be the most important key to making the decision.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Feb 5, 2011
185 posts
8 upvotes
ok thanks a lot guys

final word on senneca vs sheridan? the computer programming at senneca looks easy but it can be completed in 2 years instead of 3. What about sheridan? Is it a good college?

york and uoft don't have co-op right?
Member
Sep 30, 2012
305 posts
42 upvotes
Hamilton
ssharm02 wrote:
Apr 24th, 2015 9:47 am
ok thanks a lot guys

final word on senneca vs sheridan? the computer programming at senneca looks easy but it can be completed in 2 years instead of 3. What about sheridan? Is it a good college?
I think most colleges in bigger towns of southern Ontario are sort of similar, so Seneca, Sheridan, Mohawk, Fansahw, Centennial, Humber, etc all probably have decent programs. Of course I can't speak for personal experience since I've never been to either Seneca nor Sheridan, but based on the course descriptions I kind of like what Sheridan is offering more.
york and uoft don't have co-op right?
I don't know about York but I don't think UofT has a coop program for their Computer Science program. If you're considering a University with a coop program why not look at Ryerson? I think that would be a great option.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Feb 5, 2011
185 posts
8 upvotes
yea the Sheridan program looks great. I looked at Ryerson, but I don't meet one of their requirements. I have calculus and advance function credits but not physics, chemistry or bio. they need one of the sciences :/
Member
Jun 26, 2010
475 posts
52 upvotes
DTscript wrote:
Apr 24th, 2015 5:34 pm
I think most colleges in bigger towns of southern Ontario are sort of similar, so Seneca, Sheridan, Mohawk, Fansahw, Centennial, Humber, etc all probably have decent programs. Of course I can't speak for personal experience since I've never been to either Seneca nor Sheridan, but based on the course descriptions I kind of like what Sheridan is offering more.



I don't know about York but I don't think UofT has a coop program for their Computer Science program. If you're considering a University with a coop program why not look at Ryerson? I think that would be a great option.
UofT has PEY. If you are truly serious about going into programming and are confident in your skills, then try to go to either Waterloo or UofT. Any other place and you are just limiting your options.
Deal Fanatic
Jun 17, 2013
5120 posts
1486 upvotes
Montreal
If OP is looking for a challenge and wants the best of the best, while having the best chance at a job... Waterloo is the ONLY option. Otherwise, side jobs and projects is worth more than college / university a vs. B.
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Oct 26, 2003
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Blanket_Man wrote:
Apr 25th, 2015 4:09 pm
UofT has PEY. If you are truly serious about going into programming and are confident in your skills, then try to go to either Waterloo or UofT. Any other place and you are just limiting your options.
lots people ask about university options here, I've yet seen anyone with the caliber to goto either of those 2 school ask about it here
neverhaveiever wrote:
Apr 25th, 2015 4:13 pm
If OP is looking for a challenge and wants the best of the best, while having the best chance at a job... Waterloo is the ONLY option. Otherwise, side jobs and projects is worth more than college / university a vs. B.
not an option for op

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