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Best University for med undergrad?

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  • May 15th, 2017 7:28 am
Sr. Member
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Aug 11, 2005
625 posts
2 upvotes
That's true that McMaster and UOttawa don't look at MCAT scores but that speaks volumes about the quality of the program doesn't it?
Newbie
Nov 27, 2003
34 posts
bananaman wrote:That's true that McMaster and UOttawa don't look at MCAT scores but that speaks volumes about the quality of the program doesn't it?
Does it? Ottawa's out of region GPA cutoff this year was 3.83.. as far as I know that's the 2nd highest cutoff in Canada and probably North America. (1st highest being their out of province cutoff at 3.87)

And Mac's program is what Harvard based their program-changes on.
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May 1, 2005
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bananaman wrote:That's true that McMaster and UOttawa don't look at MCAT scores but that speaks volumes about the quality of the program doesn't it?
I'm not sure what you mean. Are you saying that the quality is lower for that reason? The UOttawa med school received a score of 4.51/5.0 (strong) by the Gourman Report, and McMaster received a 4.74/5.0 (very strong). Those are very good scores. They have their reasons for not requiring the MCATs. First of all, the test's main focus is on American schools, since it's an American test. Secondly, doing well or poorly on a test does not determine what kind of a doctor you are. Those two schools in particular are very extra-curricular oriented. While grades are important to them, your experience is even more important. I have friends who got accepted into U of T, Western, Queen's, but didn't even get an interview at UOttawa. They base their judgement on more than just grades and MCAT marks.
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Feb 2, 2005
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South Orange
7thEye wrote:Uhmm...you are baseing this on what? Have you atteneded all of the medical schools, or do you happen to attend UofT :cheesygri
Lol i would say he attended U of T, but yeah there are rankings which support what he said, although I don't care because all I know is that UT's Business program is the BEST :lol: mwuahahahah
__________________
Member
Jul 20, 2003
400 posts
4 upvotes
purple_rabbit wrote:Lol i would say he attended U of T, but yeah there are rankings which support what he said, although I don't care because all I know is that UT's Business program is the BEST :lol: mwuahahahah

I would love to say the same about the computer and engineering programs but I am sure some watertown keeener would ring me out... :D
Sr. Member
Jul 15, 2005
855 posts
9 upvotes
0
I am currently in medical school and here's my take on things..

1- Pick an undergrad that you will enjoy. You will still have to do that degree for at least 3 years, if not more, so it may as well be something you like. Furthermore, if you enjoy your courses, you will most likely obtain a higher GPA which is important for medical school admissions.

2- Make sure you take the pre-reqs, no matter which degree you choose. The pre-req courses vary between medical schools, as do quotas for out-of-province seats, so factor in everything. Unfortunately, although it is most competitive to get into an Ontario medical school, if your permanent address is from Ontario (and/or you went to high school in Ontario), you can't change your residency too easily (ie. going to Calgary for an undergraduate degree will not make you an Alberta resident). Pre-reqs range from the generic take 1 of each humanities/social science, life science and physical science to specifically asking for English literature.

3- You can factor in courses to help you with the MCAT, since all English-speaking schools (save Ottawa and NOSM) will require the MCAT two years from now (McMaster will need everyone to complete the VR for Sept 2006 applications). Usually, high school equivalents for physics are sufficient, but other courses that may help are organic chemistry, biochemistry, biology, chemistry, etc.

4- Your undergrad university will be your home for the next 3 years, so look into what else will make your time enjoyable - city, program structure, proximity to home, etc. As someone else mentioned, it is VERY important to have a life outside school and academics.

5- Always keep your options open for other opportunities outside medical school, should you either not get into medical school or you decide throughout your degree that medicine is not for you. Certainly not everyone in McGill's science first year class that said they wantd to go to medicine will even be applying 3 years down the road... Most people are not aware of other health care professions. Keep an open mind.

There is no one right undergrad degree for medical school. The people in my class vary from comparative literature to engineering to physiotherapy to health sciences to biochemistry.

Edited to add: All Canadian medical schools produce competent doctors. No one is particularly better than another one, but one may be better suited to your personal learning styles. It would be ridiculous to claim any medical school is superior. (and the Gourman report is very outdated, so that is s terrible source to base any conclusions)
Newbie
Nov 27, 2003
34 posts
Hey blink.

Just about point 3: NOSM is still going to be no-MCAT too right?
Sr. Member
Jul 15, 2005
855 posts
9 upvotes
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0T6 wrote:Hey blink.

Just about point 3: NOSM is still going to be no-MCAT too right?
Oh yes, I forgot about NOSM. They weren't around when I submitted my applications.. I'll fix that.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 5, 2005
169 posts
Wow thanks for the replies! Great help guys!

Well, i've honestly thought about it alot and idealy speaking i want to be plastic surgeon more than just a doc! Anyone have any ideas how that works? I want to be able to run my own business in the future. And what kind of an average am i looking at for next year? My last year in highschool, i'm already stressing over it like hell. I honestly enjoy science, i'm a very scientific/phlisofical person. I like to question every thing and know how everything works. I am NOT a book worm however, and my life outside of acedemics is very important. So i really shoudl start looking at other universities. I wouldn't mind living alone, but how are the finances?
Sr. Member
Jul 15, 2005
855 posts
9 upvotes
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One other benefit of Western is that it has BOTH a med and dental school. This increases your chance of getting in early, with some people being admitted into dents after 2nd year undergrad (about 2/class) and about 10 getting into Western meds after 3rd year of undergrad.
I also wanted to stress that going to a university with a medical or dental school certainly does NOT increase your chances of admission. It is not like UWO looks at its own students any differently than other applicants.
Well, i've honestly thought about it alot and idealy speaking i want to be plastic surgeon more than just a doc! Anyone have any ideas how that works? I want to be able to run my own business in the future. And what kind of an average am i looking at for next year? My last year in highschool, i'm already stressing over it like hell. I honestly enjoy science, i'm a very scientific/phlisofical person. I like to question every thing and know how everything works. I am NOT a book worm however, and my life outside of acedemics is very important. So i really shoudl start looking at other universities. I wouldn't mind living alone, but how are the finances?
First, don't be stressing about things like medical school before you are even in university..... enjoy your time in high school (and university!).. especially since plastic surgery will be a long haul in school. First complete your university undegrad (3-4+ years), then complete medical school (3-4 years), then spend another 5 years learning plastic surgery (plus any additional years for subspecialty training).

Definitely look into the different programs offered by different universities (even look outside your province!) to find something that fits well with your interests and goals. If you are planning on going to a university away from home, living alone is an option but MANY more students opt to live in residence or together in houses/apartments to keep costs down and to live with friends, etc. I suggest chatting with your high school guidance counsellor or university admissions to learn more about university living, etc. If finances are a concern, you could be eligible for OSAP.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 29, 2003
555 posts
165 upvotes
Montreal
If you want to get into medical school, you need high marks. Period. You're competing against other people with close to 4.0 averages. Just because you want to be a plastic surgeon now, doesn't mean you'll still want to be a plastic surgeon later. There are literally hundreds of fields of medicine.
As for all the hard work, tough life, etc. Bullcrap! If you're used to working and studying hard, medicine will not be more difficult, although you definitely will be sleep deprived for at least 9 years of your life, if you choose to specialize. If I could go back in time, I would still go through medicine, and I don't know anyone in medicine who wouldn't. Also, once you finish residency and maybe fellowship, your life becomes much better, financially and socially. As for student loans and such, most people who specialize (ie not family medicine) can pay off their 6 figure loans in a year or two.

If you have any specific questions, email me.

PS the reason why Ottawa U does not use MCAT scores anymore (although they did when I was there) is it is a bilingual progam and the MCAT is an anglophone exam geared towards people who grew up in english speaking North America, and therefore not suited for francophone applicants.

Dough
"The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten." Benjamin Franklin
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Jul 9, 2004
306 posts
1 upvote
anyone know how UA is? I called them up and apparently you are considered an Alberta resident if you do your undergrad there so theres a chance I may go there.
Member
Jul 20, 2003
400 posts
4 upvotes
fizzy69 wrote:Wow thanks for the replies! Great help guys!

Well, i've honestly thought about it alot and idealy speaking i want to be plastic surgeon more than just a doc! Anyone have any ideas how that works? I want to be able to run my own business in the future. And what kind of an average am i looking at for next year? My last year in highschool, i'm already stressing over it like hell. I honestly enjoy science, i'm a very scientific/phlisofical person. I like to question every thing and know how everything works. I am NOT a book worm however, and my life outside of acedemics is very important. So i really shoudl start looking at other universities. I wouldn't mind living alone, but how are the finances?
Wow I would imagine that being a boob doc would be pretty competative, no? Doesn't everyone want to be a surgeon, let alone a plastic surgeon (maybe some people in meds can clairfy).

Just relax and take it one step at a time man...
Deal Addict
May 4, 2003
1584 posts
12 upvotes
Plastics is possibly the most cut-throat field of medicine to secure a residency placement.

Rads, Derm, Opht are up there as well. Why? It's a combination of satisfying lifestyle + pay.
Newbie
Jul 16, 2005
6 posts
6 upvotes
Edmonton
sniper_myth wrote:anyone know how UA is? I called them up and apparently you are considered an Alberta resident if you do your undergrad there so theres a chance I may go there.

I'm in the med program here at U of A and I've only had good experiences so far. It's a very strong technical program with lots of research opportunities (if you want them in the summers) and the chance to get as much or as little clinical experience before clerkship as you want.

If you have any specific questions feel free to PM me.

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