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Best University for med undergrad?

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Deal Addict
Jul 21, 2004
1054 posts
63 upvotes
7thEye wrote:Wow I would imagine that being a boob doc would be pretty competative, no? Doesn't everyone want to be a surgeon, let alone a plastic surgeon (maybe some people in meds can clairfy).

Just relax and take it one step at a time man...
Actually Derm is consistently the most competitive residency prog in canada, due to its low number I think only 3 - 4 ppl are accepted each year in CaRMS match. If you look at past several years stats, I recall that Internal Meds it picking up steam, while Gen Sx is losing popularity.

Anyways, to answer the person original post, there is no exact good program for getting into meds school. Some undergrad programs are more challenging than other, but you still can get good grades out of it. Sometimes these program offer a better prep for the material to be taught in meds school.

Yet, if you are only in first year, one word of caution, NOT EVERYONE GETS INTO MEDS SCHOOL, do have a backup plan. So don't just take all bird courses that does nothing for you, just in case that you don't get in!

Good Luck
Member
Nov 27, 2004
332 posts
2 upvotes
As of next year Western is dropping its requirments for medicine. Meaning that you DO NOT need to take certain courses or have a certain major. As long as you have a university degree in something, with good grades and a lot of involvement in activities.

Now they did not mention if you still need to take the MCAT. I assume that you dont because if they want people in the arts to apply how do they expect them to do the MCAT?
Sr. Member
Jul 15, 2005
855 posts
9 upvotes
netgeek wrote:As of next year Western is dropping its requirments for medicine. Meaning that you DO NOT need to take certain courses or have a certain major. As long as you have a university degree in something, with good grades and a lot of involvement in activities.

Now they did not mention if you still need to take the MCAT. I assume that you dont because if they want people in the arts to apply how do they expect them to do the MCAT?
No. UWO plans on keeping the MCAT and GPA requirements.
Besides, it is not any old degree.. you need a 4-year honours degree.
Newbie
Jan 5, 2004
72 posts
10 upvotes
fizzy69 wrote: and my life outside of acedemics is very important.
i hope you realize that as a plastics surgery resident you will be working 100-120 hours a week, often pulling 28-36 hours shifts with little or no sleep, your work will involve debriding pressure sores & burns and trauma work and NOT boob jobs, and this will be for 5-7 years AFTER med school... in other words don't get too fond of your life outside of medicine

and if you're already stressing now just wait until you're a resident... undergrad was a joke, med school was easy, but residency will push you to the edge, especially a surgical residency, and frankly simply not worth it

good luck :cheesygri
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May 5, 2005
1071 posts
GTA
jabronie505 wrote:i hope you realize that as a plastics surgery resident you will be working 100-120 hours a week, often pulling 28-36 hours shifts with little or no sleep, your work will involve debriding pressure sores & burns and trauma work and NOT boob jobs, and this will be for 5-7 years AFTER med school... in other words don't get too fond of your life outside of medicine

and if you're already stressing now just wait until you're a resident... undergrad was a joke, med school was easy, but residency will push you to the edge, especially a surgical residency, and frankly simply not worth it

good luck :cheesygri
Im not interested in med school. But please do explain why residency will push you to the edge? What are involved and how stressful is it?
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Deal Addict
Jul 31, 2004
1469 posts
31 upvotes
GTA
I haven't heard anything about UWO taking away the MCAT as an admission requirement. Although they removed the prerequisite courses, you can't apply until at least 4th year undergrad. I'm not sure if the other Ontario med schools have made any changes re: years of study.

As for the question about how popular different specialties are, you can see a ton of different statistics at the CaRMS website. This year, 98% of people who wanted general surgery as their first choice discipline got it somewhere in Canada. For the sake of comparison, it was 40% for dermatology this year, 54% for plastic surgery, and 46% of emergency medicine. 20% of the 1400 applicants to CaRMS ranked a surgical discipline (including obstetrics/gynecology) as their first choice.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 5, 2005
169 posts
Yah, Why is will it push you to the edge? My idea of plastic surgery is not simply confined the ideal 'boob job'. I know the kinds of patients i will have, and i feel very comfortable with that. It actually motivates me more, knowing that i'm brightening of peoples lives. 100-200 hours a week? Really? How so? Why?

Now i'm just confused as hell. Please clarify!
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User avatar
Nov 16, 2004
2233 posts
2 upvotes
Scarborough
Anyone know what kind of average a person needs to get into Life Sciences at U of T downtown?

Edit: Or in fact the average that you need for Life Sciences/BioMed at other unis? Western, Queens, Mac, Waterloo?
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 5, 2005
169 posts
Last i checked was

80%+ In Chem Bio Calc Eng
Physics strongly recommended
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Nov 16, 2004
2233 posts
2 upvotes
Scarborough
fizzy69 wrote:Last i checked was

80%+ In Chem Bio Calc Eng
Physics strongly recommended
This is for U of T St. George Campus? When didja last check? Plus..you guys think this is a good program to go for if i'm planning for med school?
Deal Addict
Jul 31, 2004
1469 posts
31 upvotes
GTA
A 12+ hour day during a surgery residency is not uncommon. Start rounding on patients at 5:30-6 AM, and leave past 6 PM. So that's already >60 hours in a week. Then you're on call in the hospital a couple of nights a week and have a good chance of being up all night... so that would add about 24 hours to our total. That leaves us at >84 hours. You're technically allowed to go home the next day "post-call" but residents especially in surgery often stay around anyway because they don't want to look lazy/weak. And you'd be on call a weekend or two per month. Depending on the program it could be just one full day (e.g. Saturday morning until Sunday morning) or even the whole weekend... they can do this to you by saying you're on "home call" for the whole weekend and so you're allowed to be at home whenever there's nothing going on at the hospital... of course, when you're on a busy service, that could be little to never. So adding this to our total and we're at well over 100 hours. When I was doing my ortho rotation, one of the residents I worked with said that he had hardly seen his wife in over 2 weeks because of the long hours and the call switch that put him on call for 2 straight full weekends. Bottom line is that you'd better be passionate about that particular field of surgery to subject yourself to that for 5-7 years.

It's great that you find plastic surgery interesting, but there are a huge number of people who end up doing something different from what they thought they would do on the first day of med school. Try to keep an open mind. Good luck.
Newbie
Jan 5, 2004
72 posts
10 upvotes
fizzy69 wrote:Yah, Why is will it push you to the edge? My idea of plastic surgery is not simply confined the ideal 'boob job'. I know the kinds of patients i will have, and i feel very comfortable with that. It actually motivates me more, knowing that i'm brightening of peoples lives. 100-200 hours a week? Really? How so? Why?

Now i'm just confused as hell. Please clarify!
are you sure you know the type of patients you will have?
-the ungrateful, belligerent alcoholic who got punched in the face and now you have to care for him at 3 in the morning
-the demented 100 year old patient who has 500 medical problems and is bedridden and now has a huge pressure sore for you to fix
-but maybe you think cosmetics will be better... you'll still have to deal with the entitled, demanding patient who will expect nothing but perfection

life as a resident sucks. as a first year surgical resident be prepared to be on-call once every 3 or 4 days. being on call means that you start your day around 6 am and you stay in the hospital for the next 28-36 hours. while on-call you are often the only doctor around and you are expected to care for every patient on your service and deal with any medical emergencies that they may have... you will also be expected to do any consults that come out of the emergency department and admit any new patients to your service. i have done calls where i was up on my feet and running around for 36 hours straight... no sleep, maybe 1 meal and a cup of coffee, and lucky to get a bathroom break (hence the prerequisite for an iron stomach and a steel bladder)... once your call is over you can go home and sleep but you are expected to work the very next day, 12 hours later. and for all of this you get your measly resident's salary which if you calculate it out may work out to about $10/hr despite the MD after your name

and as a 5th year chief resident some will argue that it actually gets worse... even though you're doing call at home you're on call once every 2 days (if you're really unlucky it could be everyday)... while on-call you will be expected to take phone calls and be available to come into hospital 24 hrs a day... describing how hard residency is in words is difficult... most people don't know how bad it is until they actually do it

like someone else mentioned earlier think hard before deciding to do medicine... you'll make good money eventually but it is generally agreed upon in medical circles that there are easier ways to make moey if that's what you want. even the respect isn't what it once used to be. i had a patient once that wouldn't let me examine him unless i fetched him a cup of coffee first which is a tad annoying when it's 3 am and you've been up for 20 hours. i've had several patients answer their cell phones and carry on a conversation for several minutes in the middle of a visit. just last week a doc at my hospital was assaulted by a patient's husband. i remember as a medical student i was having coffee with 2 other residents, a fellow, and an attending physician and all of us said we wouldn't do it again if we had a choice. ok that's enough ranting from me. perhaps there are other physicians or residents on this forum who feel differently and can offer you a different perspective. (like a radiologist :cheesygri )
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 5, 2005
169 posts
Wow... Thnanks for the input guys, seriously. Big help to me!

The thing that keeps me going, is the fact that i believe that all my life prior becoming a doc will be a drainage on the world, and in a wierd way becoming a doc, helping people out will be my way of giving back to the world. My way of making a difference. There may be easier ways of making money, but i really value making a diffrence.

I'm hearing lots of negatives, any positives?
Sr. Member
Nov 21, 2003
848 posts
2 upvotes
Health Science at Mac is the best pre-med program in the country. It's the same faculty with the same profs as Mac's med school, the coursework is the most like med school, easy marks, and the majority of the grads get into med school or dentistry school. It's also the most direct route to Mac's med school. Need minimum 90's in HS, plus extracurricular activities.

If you can't get into an exclusive program like this, then pick something easy enough where you can get a 4.0 average. And load up on extracurriculars.

As for being a doctor, I once planned on going that route. Bottom line: don't do it for the money. Try to get as much experience working in a hospital or with patients while in high school. Volunteering at hospitals is a must. I also did a co-op term in an ICU in high school. Talk to med students and doctors about their career choice. Essentially, with the level of intelligence and work ethic required to be a doctor, you can make as much or more money much quicker in business.
Sr. Member
Apr 10, 2005
604 posts
57 upvotes
Montreal
wow... after hearing all this I almost want to drop out of med school :)

Fizzy - there will be a lot of work, but for the moment, just deal with undergrad; you're 4 years away from even applying, so pick a field that interests you, at a university/city you'll enjoy attending (if you like cities, then go to UoT or McGill, if not, then go somewhere smaller). If you're happy in school, you'll do better. In 4 years you may not even want ot go to med school any more, if you do, then worry about it at the time. As far as specializing goes, most people don't know what they're going to do untill the 3rd or 4th year of med school (thats 7-8 years from now for you), and I'm about 90% sure that you wont decide to go into plastics, because you probably don't know enough about it, and all the other feilds to make a real descision at this point.

Personally, I like McGill, and I love Montreal, but go for whatever floats your boat.

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