Sports & Recreation

Bike selection - need advise?

[OP]
Member
Apr 23, 2008
310 posts
13 upvotes
Toronto

Bike selection - need advise?

Hi,

I'm shopping for a bike. I checked Costco’s site and found the following bikes (in order of my preference after reviewing their description):
https://www.costco.ca/Kulana-Cloche-Com ... 96978.html
https://www.costco.ca/Mongoose-Reform-S ... 96791.html
https://www.costco.ca/700c-Men's-Kent-T ... 54466.html
https://www.costco.ca/Infinity-Boss-Thr ... 09161.html
https://www.costco.ca/Infinity-Lahaina- ... 08989.html
https://www.costco.ca/Kent-Belmar-Cruis ... 13860.html
https://www.costco.ca/Infinity-Crazyhor ... 09156.html

I also looked at the following Northrock bikes, however, as per their description they are good for people 5'7" and up:
https://www.costco.ca/Northrock-SCR1-70 ... 83745.html
https://www.costco.ca/Northrock-XC00-Fa ... 83744.html

I’m 5’ 5” and will use the bike mostly for recreational use - parks, trails, e.t.c. and if I enjoy enough I may even decide to use it to commute to work (10km each way) few days in summer. I'm new to biking and this will be my first bike. So I'm looking for a bike that fits my size and is comfortable and enjoy to ride so I don't give up on biking altogether.
Which one of these bikes suits me better? Any other recommendation is appreciated.

Thanks in advance.
Last edited by smehmood on Jul 3rd, 2018 12:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
31 replies
Deal Addict
Sep 29, 2004
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I suggest you visit a bike shop. The people can determine the best bike for you and you would be getting a better bike (parts) than what Costco is offering. Just tell them how much you're willing to spend at the beginning. At least you can test ride the bike before you make a decision too.

Now that it's midway through summer cycling season, there should be sales as bike shops want to get rid of their inventory by October.
Deal Addict
Aug 28, 2014
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Toronto, ON
Look for no suspension hybrid with thin 700c wheels and adjustable handlebar stem. Suspension seatpost is ok but will wear out eventually. Mechanical disc brakes are nice to have but require some fiddling around and are heavier than rim brakes. A thin light bike that rolls easily is so much more enjoyable to ride casually. Mountain bikes, bikes with suspension and thick tires require a lot of energy move and are not fun at all when you're not on a dirt path.

At your height you will need a small frame and costco can't give you that.
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Mar 6, 2003
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nabiul wrote:
Jul 1st, 2018 3:26 am
At your height you will need a small frame and costco can't give you that.
+1. All of Costco mens bikes optimally fits people around 5 9 or so. While you might be able to ride one of the Costco bikes physically, it will be not an ideal fit.
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smehmood wrote:
Jul 1st, 2018 11:46 pm
This one https://www.costco.ca/Mongoose-Reform-S ... 96791.html says "Suggested rider height from:1.62 m to 1.87 m (5 ft. 3 in. to 6 ft. 1 in.)"
Possibly!

That height range is ridiculously big though....realistically, normal bikes usually have a range around 5-6 inches, not 10 inches. I would say that bike probably still fits a 5 8" person best and a 5 3" person would find it unwieldy.

When Costco had all the Northrock bikes in stock, I went to the store and tried every one of them on the floor and found them all big (I am about 5 7").

It also depends on what your proportions are. Some people with longer limbs or shorter limbs may have to size up or down from the manufacturer's recommendations. The only way to know for sure is to going try each bike out for size. I suppose, with Costco, it's easy to return it!
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[OP]
Member
Apr 23, 2008
310 posts
13 upvotes
Toronto
nabiul wrote:
Jul 1st, 2018 3:26 am
A thin light bike that rolls easily is so much more enjoyable to ride casually.
What is considered light? 14kg?
Deal Addict
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smehmood wrote:
Jul 2nd, 2018 9:58 pm
What is considered light? 14kg?
less than 16 pounds.
Deal Addict
Aug 28, 2014
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smehmood wrote:
Jul 2nd, 2018 9:58 pm
What is considered light? 14kg?
That is pretty subjective, what I find light could be an anchor to some one who rides carbon frames. But I should have been more specific; thin light wheels are far more important than the overall weight of the bike. My bikes for example, a 2017 diadora modena and a 2012 scott spark elite feel like they weigh nearly the same when you pick them up but the spark is so much more sluggish and such a chore to pedal because it has thick, heavy and spongy wheels that absorb alot of the power you put into each pedal stroke, the suspension too moves and absorbs energy when you stand up and try to put your weight into pedaling.
Newbie
Jun 18, 2018
8 posts
5 upvotes
If you go to a bike store, you need a budget and try to stick to it. I had a higher budget than what i bought my bike for because sometimes..the bike you want just doesn't fit you (ie. the frame for brand and model "x" doesn't fit you well in the size that would be best for you)

From the sounds of it, if you're staying on pavement, i'd go for a hybrid bike. Pretty upright, pretty comfortable ergonomics and good for entry level. No front suspension at the forks ideally as entry level ones are pretty heavy and you want to go "realistically" light.

Then another thing to look at comfort wise is the width of the tire. For casual riding with good comfort, the size of the wheel x tire you'd be looking for would probably be 700 x 32c (the 32c being the width...you can go bigger to get more comfortable riding), if you wanna go faster, once you've built a bit of fitness around riding the bicycle, reducing the tire width can help a bunch, but you're then sacrificing some comfort. As you get more accustomed to riding though, your muscles get used to the road conditions and can take a "beating" better lol

The height/size of the bike will vary from one manufacturer to the other, but a bike shop employee will know what to look for you. At 5'8" the frame of the bike is usually 54cm (or 21") meaning, when i have my butt off the saddle, and my feet on the ground at a stop, i have about an inch or 2 of clearance for my privates (well at least for a man's reference) so that's something to keep in mind. For hybrids that length is important but also the length between your seat and the handlebars, as it'll determine your positioning on the bike. Once again, employees should help you with that

If you want to start commuting your 10k, maybe look at bike shorts with padding, although for that distance you might not need it...but it's always nice to have that extra-comfort to offset harsh road conditions.
[OP]
Member
Apr 23, 2008
310 posts
13 upvotes
Toronto
zephillou wrote:
Jul 5th, 2018 12:31 pm
If you go to a bike store, you need a budget and try to stick to it. I had a higher budget than what i bought my bike for because sometimes..the bike you want just doesn't fit you (ie. the frame for brand and model "x" doesn't fit you well in the size that would be best for you)

From the sounds of it, if you're staying on pavement, i'd go for a hybrid bike. Pretty upright, pretty comfortable ergonomics and good for entry level. No front suspension at the forks ideally as entry level ones are pretty heavy and you want to go "realistically" light.

Then another thing to look at comfort wise is the width of the tire. For casual riding with good comfort, the size of the wheel x tire you'd be looking for would probably be 700 x 32c (the 32c being the width...you can go bigger to get more comfortable riding), if you wanna go faster, once you've built a bit of fitness around riding the bicycle, reducing the tire width can help a bunch, but you're then sacrificing some comfort. As you get more accustomed to riding though, your muscles get used to the road conditions and can take a "beating" better lol

The height/size of the bike will vary from one manufacturer to the other, but a bike shop employee will know what to look for you. At 5'8" the frame of the bike is usually 54cm (or 21") meaning, when i have my butt off the saddle, and my feet on the ground at a stop, i have about an inch or 2 of clearance for my privates (well at least for a man's reference) so that's something to keep in mind. For hybrids that length is important but also the length between your seat and the handlebars, as it'll determine your positioning on the bike. Once again, employees should help you with that

If you want to start commuting your 10k, maybe look at bike shorts with padding, although for that distance you might not need it...but it's always nice to have that extra-comfort to offset harsh road conditions.
Thanks for the explanation! Based on the above suggestions here is the criteria developed so far:
- Hybrid
- 700 x 32 tires
- No front suspension
- Optimal bike weight ?
- Optimal frame size ?

Went to a bike store and it seems both Small and Medium size frame fits me; obviously Small will give me more clearance than medium. Is more clearance better and I go with Small size?
Deal Addict
Aug 28, 2014
1747 posts
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Only way to know is to try them and see, almost no one has perfect proportions; short arms, long legs, short torso etc. Any good bike shop should have models to try out. If you can sit comfortably and almost fully extend your legs during the pedal stroke while at the same time not having to stretch your arms to reach the handlebar then it should be fine. If you have to stretch then you're going to be bent over, your arms will get sore, your neck will get sore etc. Optimal weight is whatever you can comfortably lift up and carry on your shoulder to get over obstacles like stairs.

This isn't something you can spec out on paper; biking is a physical thing and you have to actually try it. And you won't get it right the first time; if you stick with cycling you will eventually end up customizing your bike/s to your preferences. The type of riding you do may also change as you progress, with mountain biking a smaller frame is preferred to make it easier to shift your weight around and to make the bike jump over obstacles, on a road going hybrid that doesn't matter so much.
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Aug 27, 2014
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Check the police auction, they often have nice bikes there and if you're lucky bidding then you can get a bargain
[OP]
Member
Apr 23, 2008
310 posts
13 upvotes
Toronto
Here are the bikes I have short-listed:
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/ca/cypress - $499
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/ca/escape-3 - $519
https://www.trekbikes.com/ca/en_CA/bike ... rCode=grey - $529.99
All these fall in my price range of $500 to $600.

There is another one which is a bit pricier but I don't mind if it is worth spending a little more:
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/ca/escape-2 - $619

I hope to try these bikes this weekend. Anyone has experience on these bikes or recommend one over the other? Or recommend any other bike in my price range?

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