Sports & Recreation

Bike selection - need advise?

Deal Addict
Sep 29, 2004
3751 posts
304 upvotes
Toronto
I wouldn't buy the Trek Verve 1. It's got fat tires and will cause a lot of drag/slowness per pedaling.

Out of those, I would go with the Giant Escape model.
Now is it worth buying an Escape 2 over the Escape 3. Escape 2 has an aluminum fork and Escape 3 has chromoly steel. Escape 2 is a 8 speed bike and Escape 3 is 7 speed. The only 2 major different.
Try them both at the store and see which one is more to your liking and needs.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 6, 2003
11460 posts
2274 upvotes
Ottawa
Mr. Robo wrote:
Jul 7th, 2018 5:10 pm
Now is it worth buying an Escape 2 over the Escape 3. Escape 2 has an aluminum fork and Escape 3 has chromoly steel. Escape 2 is a 8 speed bike and Escape 3 is 7 speed. The only 2 major different.
not that it matters much, the Escape 3 says it has a hi-tensile steel not chromoly steel fork. Usually bike makers charge more for chromoly steel in the order of hi-tensile->chromoly->aluminum->carbon in terms of pricing.

For @OP, the Escape 3 is absolutely fine, you aren't going to notice a big difference. If you are going to spend a lot of time on the bike, some nice padded shorts would be a great investment, or upgrading the seat can also do wonders. But as Robo says, try them all out.....at this point, it's becomes subjective. Obviously, the more you spend, the bike starts to get lighter.
Deal Addict
Aug 28, 2014
1836 posts
396 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Escape 2 or 3. The other bikes have quill stems and it doesn't make sense to get a quill stem unless they are adjustable. Also as mentioned the other two have fatter tires and one has grip shifters which are awful. Escape 3 works just fine but escape two has nicer in frame cable routing and aluminum fork,which doesn't really matter but the one difference you might care about is the mountain bike shifters and derailleurs. The feel and location of the shifter triggers will be slightly different from the EZ fire shifters on the escape three and you may or may not like them.
Sr. Member
Sep 6, 2011
639 posts
978 upvotes
Decent grip shifter (SRAM X0) >>> way better than >>> decent trigger shifter (Shimano XT). That being said, those bikes come with the lowest shifting components possible. There's a lot of corners cut to make a tiny profit out of a $500 bike.
[OP]
Member
Apr 23, 2008
329 posts
27 upvotes
Toronto
Thanks for your feedback!
I dropped Trek Verve 1 based on the feedback above.

Here is an update from my test ride (had to visit different stores for my size):
1) Escape 3:
I felt pressure on my hand likely due to the seat position not being upright (putting weight on my arms); pressure on my butt perhaps due to uncomfortable seat; I can feel bumps in the ride perhaps due to thin tires

2) Escape 2:
Same as for Escape 3; I was told there is no difference in terms of comfort between Escape 3 and 2 and the only difference is Escape 2 has better quality parts

3) Cypress DX:
Cypress (non-DX) is not available so I was given the option to try Cypress DX. The ride was very comfortable; no pressure in my arms likely because of the upright seat position and fatter tires; comfortable seat

Now I know Cypress DX was the most comfortable of the three, however, it comes with quill stem (?), suspension, wider tires, likely more weight all of which are not in my selection criteria above based on the suggestions made in this post. I have the option for ordering a a special order for Cypress (non-DX) but I would then have to take it (without a test ride) whether I like it or not.
Questions:

- Cypress DX - Should I take Cypress DX with fatter tires, suspension and possibly quill stem?
- Cypress (non-DX): Should I go-ahead and do a special order for Cypress (non-DX) since it does not have suspension (lighter weight) and Cypress DX was a comfortable ride? I'm reluctant.
- Escape 2/3: Is the pressure on arms temporary with Escape 2/3 and I will get used to the seating position and seat with the passage of time? Can the seat be adjusted for a more upright ride? Should I replace for a more comfortable seat in future (hope it doesn't cost much) if required? Is Escape 2 better than Escape 3 or vice-versa in terms of comfort?
Last edited by smehmood on Jul 10th, 2018 4:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Addict
Jan 11, 2007
2895 posts
353 upvotes
Mississauga
Whats the best bike that combines comfort with riding position so can really pound out speed but is also comfortable. i am hearing gravel and cyclecross bikes are good. i find the ones with too upright geometry feel like they are meant for a sunday stroll lol need to be able to hammer it at times. also don't mind hopping the odd curb :)

right now using a beat up trek 7.2 which sort of does what i want but this one is huge but i seem to be doing ok (63.5 frame) i am 5.11. id be better prob with a 56 frame i think
Deal Addict
Aug 28, 2014
1836 posts
396 upvotes
Toronto, ON
smehmood wrote:
Jul 10th, 2018 3:39 pm
Thanks for your feedback!
I dropped Trek Verve 1 based on the feedback above.

Here is an update from my test ride (had to visit different stores for my size):
1) Escape 3:
I felt pressure on my hand likely due to the seat position not being upright (putting weight on my arms); pressure on my butt perhaps due to uncomfortable seat; I can feel bumps in the ride perhaps due to thin tires

2) Escape 2:
Same as for Escape 3; I was told there is no difference in terms of comfort between Escape 3 and 2 and the only difference is Escape 2 has better quality parts

3) Cypress DX:
Cypress (non-DX) is not available so I was given the option to try Cypress DX. The ride was very comfortable; no pressure in my arms likely because of the upright seat position and fatter tires; comfortable seat

Now I know Cypress DX was the most comfortable of the three, however, it comes with quill stem (?), suspension, wider tires, likely more weight all of which are not in my selection criteria above based on the suggestions made in this post. I have the option for ordering a a special order for Cypress (non-DX) but I would then have to take it (without a test ride) whether I like it or not.
Questions:

- Cypress DX - Should I take Cypress DX with fatter tires, suspension and possibly quill stem?
- Cypress (non-DX): Should I go-ahead and do a special order for Cypress (non-DX) since it does not have suspension (lighter weight) and Cypress DX was a comfortable ride? I'm reluctant.
- Escape 2/3: Is the pressure on arms temporary with Escape 2/3 and I will get used to the seating position and seat with the passage of time? Can the seat be adjusted for a more upright ride? Should I replace for a more comfortable seat in future (hope it doesn't cost much) if required? Is Escape 2 better than Escape 3 or vice-versa in terms of comfort?
Cypress DX is good. It has an adjustable quill stem which can be moved up and down and the angle changed for comfort. Non adjustable quill stems like on regular cypress are bad. I ride something very similar with 700x38c tires too and I have the stem all the way up for an upright comfort position. Suspension will add a couple of pounds but at the end of the day if you can lift and carry the bike and you don't notice the suspension going up and down when you pedal then it is fine. Cypress DX has shimano EF500 trigger shifters which are great. Non DX has grip shifters, which I doubt you will like.

The pressure on your arms is not temporary! It is because of a low front down riding position which is better for speed but you are sacrificing comfort. The only fix would be to change the stem for something which brings the bars up higher and closer to you, but then it just becomes like the Cypress DX. In fact on my bike even after having the stem all the way up I swapped out the handlebars for ones that have a large 15 degree swept back angle because there was still pressure on my arms. I can't keep up with the spandex clad road bikers on the path, but then again I'm going for endurance rides and not really racing.
You can swap the fixed seatpost for a suspension seat to make it comfortable, but again the Cypress DX already has one.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 6, 2003
11460 posts
2274 upvotes
Ottawa
As far as position goes, the Escape is considered a "fitness" hybrid in that you do lean forward a little bit (fairly upright but leaning forward a bit). Leaning forward allows your body to slip through the wind better, because aerodynamics is the factor that slows you down on a bike most.

But if you think you'd prefer the Cypress DX because of its position and cushy ride, that's probably what you should buy...because you have to be comfortable otherwise riding the bike is a chore. Nothing is worse than somebody convincing you to get bike A because it's faster and lighter or because it's a hot deal but if you hate riding it, it's not a good bike. That's why there are so many kinds of bikes, everyone has different needs.

I have a road bike and I'm older now, so I can't ride an aggressive racing bike, so I chose a road bike that has some comfort features (more upright position, shock absorbing features in the frame). Everyone is different, some people love to ride fast and have the body flexibility to get really low. I ride more for pleasure so saving a few seconds out of my ride isn't a priority. Everybody rides for a different purpose.
[OP]
Member
Apr 23, 2008
329 posts
27 upvotes
Toronto
Thanks again for the feedback! Getting close...
If I use Cypress DX for commute to work (10 km each way) would my physical effort (due to fat tires and weight) a lot more vs Escape 2/3? Approximately how much time more would Cypress DX take vs Escape 2/3 for this commute?
Deal Addict
Sep 29, 2004
3751 posts
304 upvotes
Toronto
smehmood wrote:
Jul 11th, 2018 2:37 pm
Thanks again for the feedback! Getting close...
If I use Cypress DX for commute to work (10 km each way) would my physical effort (due to fat tires and weight) a lot more vs Escape 2/3? Approximately how much time more would Cypress DX take vs Escape 2/3 for this commute?
I had a Giant Yukon mountain bike at least a decade ago, fat tires and probably like 30lbs. It was definitely heavy. I'd say, it was comfortable riding through potholes, cracks, TTC tracks. I was riding in a almost straight/bit bend position. The biggest thing I couldn't stand was the slow pedaling power compare to other cyclist. Riding against the wind was the worst, I remember this little kid on the bike path was pedaling like a maniac and he was passing me. Not to mention too when you have to go up the hills. You have to exert more strength. All this is due to your fitness level too.

I now ride a couple of mid range hybrid bikes. Yes, my body is at a 45 degree angle and my butt can feel the bumps. I am more in shape than over before. I can handle any aches or pains as well as long distance rides (40 to 60km).
Wear some good padded shorts.

Like what Warpdrive said, everybody is different. Maybe you feel uncomfortable when you were trying those Escape bikes, but after a while (maybe) your body will adjust to the geometric of those styles. Either way, I don't want you to later on regret buying the wrong bike. Go with what you believe is perfect for you.

Also, I want to say this. I've seen big guys on mountain bikes who can power these bikes with ease. It comes down to the rider and his or her fitness level.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 27, 2008
3351 posts
166 upvotes
Adelaide
smehmood wrote:
Jul 11th, 2018 2:37 pm
Thanks again for the feedback! Getting close...
If I use Cypress DX for commute to work (10 km each way) would my physical effort (due to fat tires and weight) a lot more vs Escape 2/3? Approximately how much time more would Cypress DX take vs Escape 2/3 for this commute?
That's really hard to say as there are a lot of factors that go into it. In a really general sense, the difference between the bikes will get bigger the faster you want to go. As warpdrive mentioned, fighting against drag is the biggest resistance to going faster. At slow speeds there wont be as much of a difference between your aerodynamics as when you are going faster, but at faster speeds the difference can be quite large. Are you looking to casually commute in, or thinking about pushing hard to try and get there fast?

Other factor is what your commute looks like. A ride on a road with lots of intersections has the potential to make going faster either very worthwhile (you make it through lights you otherwise would not make going slower) or no difference at all (you end up stopped at intersections for a long time).
Sr. Member
Feb 10, 2003
837 posts
226 upvotes
Calgary
smehmood wrote:
Jul 10th, 2018 3:39 pm
Thanks for your feedback!
1) Escape 3:
I felt pressure on my hand likely due to the seat position not being upright (putting weight on my arms); pressure on my butt perhaps due to uncomfortable seat; I can feel bumps in the ride perhaps due to thin tires

3) Cypress DX:
Cypress (non-DX) is not available so I was given the option to try Cypress DX. The ride was very comfortable; no pressure in my arms likely because of the upright seat position and fatter tires; comfortable seat

Questions:

- Cypress DX - Should I take Cypress DX with fatter tires, suspension and possibly quill stem?
- Cypress (non-DX): Should I go-ahead and do a special order for Cypress (non-DX) since it does not have suspension (lighter weight) and Cypress DX was a comfortable ride? I'm reluctant.
- Escape 2/3: Is the pressure on arms temporary with Escape 2/3 and I will get used to the seating position and seat with the passage of time? Can the seat be adjusted for a more upright ride? Should I replace for a more comfortable seat in future (hope it doesn't cost much) if required? Is Escape 2 better than Escape 3 or vice-versa in terms of comfort?
smehmood wrote:
Jul 11th, 2018 2:37 pm
Thanks again for the feedback! Getting close...
If I use Cypress DX for commute to work (10 km each way) would my physical effort (due to fat tires and weight) a lot more vs Escape 2/3? Approximately how much time more would Cypress DX take vs Escape 2/3 for this commute?
I'll say that most of your questions can't be answered without a lot more information about you and your commute.

I would guess that the pressure in your arms would go away as you ride more and gain some core strength. You can do some exercises off the bike to help with this. Your body weight should be mainly supported by your core, through your butt and legs rather than your arms - think 90/10 split.

For bumps, you're riding a bike not driving a Cadillac, it shouldn't feel completely isolated. The difference in bump absorption is probably more due to that suspension seatpost abomination than the difference in tire thickness. You could buy padded shorts or a plush saddle for the other bike if you really wanted to.

Hard to quantify the difference in effort level and time savings. Extra weight will have a greater impact if your commute is hilly or has a lot of stop and go than if it's flat and steady cruising. Aerodynamics has a much bigger effect at 30km/h than it does at 10km/h.

Again, without knowing anything about you, 10km each way, 5 days a week will probably do incredible things for your fitness level. If you actually commit to that much riding, you'd probably outgrow the comfort bike pretty quickly (unless you're a senior). Have you considered buying a used bike to try for a while before you commit to something brand new?
[OP]
Member
Apr 23, 2008
329 posts
27 upvotes
Toronto
I went to lbs yesterday to purchase Cypress DX. They didn't had the color I like so I have to order it online to get that color. While there I did a test ride again of DX and Escape 3; DX felt more comfortable than Escape 3 however, it wasn't as comfortable (some pressure in arms and butt) as it was the first time around. I felt Escape 3 more knee-friendly (less pedaling effort), much lighter in weight, faster and in a nice color. I now read the above feedback and I'm thinking Escape 3 may be a better fit - I will get use to the slight bent position (hopefully build the required muscles), it will help in my fitness (it's a fitness bike!) and enjoy my commute (more knee-friendly and fast). I know the seat hurts, which I will have to replace for a comfortable seat if I don't get use to it.
To BongoBong's question riding fast is not a factor now but think I may want to ride fast as I get use to biking. Commute will be on roads or bike trails and riding for pleasure in parks and shore. I won't be doing much off-roads.
Deal Addict
Apr 18, 2013
1842 posts
604 upvotes
Canada
I bought an Escape 3 about a month ago and have been commuting 22 kms every weekday and I really like it. Very solid comfortable bike and I would recommend it.

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