Automotive

Brake Pads / Shoes - Honda Civic

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  • Aug 3rd, 2005 7:21 pm
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[OP]
Banned
May 5, 2003
4879 posts
30 upvotes
Toronto, Ontario

Brake Pads / Shoes - Honda Civic

I'm looking for pads and shoes for a 2001 Civic.

Where should I buy them from? The only two places I can think of are Honda and CT. Should I buy genuine or aftermarket? Anyone know of any other place to buy from?

Thanks!
6 replies
Jr. Member
Nov 9, 2003
129 posts
Toronto
honda pads are good in that they're quiet and brake well but depending on your driving they don't last as long as some others, figure about 40-60k on average. They're pretty cheap too as far as pads go, a good set of aftermarket pads will probably cost the same or more as the Honda pads, only experience I have are with the Wagner Thermoquiet pads which worked quite well for me, there are other high quality aftermarket brake pads as well, but once again, you pay for them.

Stay far far away from the so called "lifetime" warranty brake pads, sure the brake pads might last a while, but they'll go through a few sets of rotors before they wear out and they make a hell of a lot of noise, not to mention that the braking performance is pretty crap.

A set of Honda pads installed are only 109 plus tax (standard Honda pricing), plus possibly machining the rotors if neccessary. They perform well and are quiet

Same thing that I said above applies to shoes, price included, however shoes last forever, unless you have ever 100k km, chances are you don't have to change them. Depending on the driving some shoes will last 2-300k km no problem
Member
Jan 7, 2004
487 posts
1 upvote
T.Dot
Thermoquiets are good pads, we use them on customers cars alot at work.

I do recommend getting new rotors even if they are the cheap ones, it is far better than machining your rotors. I know honda pushes machining the rotors bcus they make more money that way.

Machining a pair of rotors usually cost around $30, a new pair is around $60-80+. + labour, which u get charged either way.

Machined rotors dont last long, they wrap very soon after bcus you are making the metal thiner and it becomes weaker and less able to retain/dispense heat. This is why at my shop we never recommend machining, even thou we would make more money doing it, 90% of the customers would be back within a month with wraped rotors. Add to the fact than they dont make em like they used to.....with newer cars rotors are becoming less thicker and less metal is availble to be machined off. Back in the olden days when rotors wieghed a ton and were a few inches thick it was ok to machine them.


If the rotors look good/not too rusted/no pitting and have a nice smooth surface, you may get away with just slapping a set of pads on and not machining them......if with the new pads u get a vibration while braking, then they'll need to be replaced. This is something i'd tell u to do if you were installin the stuff urself, but if you took it to a shop, u'd have to pay labour charges every time.
Sr. Member
Jan 17, 2005
621 posts
2 upvotes
TrEvOrLiCioUs wrote:Thermoquiets are good pads, we use them on customers cars alot at work.

I do recommend getting new rotors even if they are the cheap ones, it is far better than machining your rotors. I know honda pushes machining the rotors bcus they make more money that way.

Machining a pair of rotors usually cost around $30, a new pair is around $60-80+. + labour, which u get charged either way.

Machined rotors dont last long, they wrap very soon after bcus you are making the metal thiner and it becomes weaker and less able to retain/dispense heat. This is why at my shop we never recommend machining, even thou we would make more money doing it, 90% of the customers would be back within a month with wraped rotors. Add to the fact than they dont make em like they used to.....with newer cars rotors are becoming less thicker and less metal is availble to be machined off. Back in the olden days when rotors wieghed a ton and were a few inches thick it was ok to machine them.


If the rotors look good/not too rusted/no pitting and have a nice smooth surface, you may get away with just slapping a set of pads on and not machining them......if with the new pads u get a vibration while braking, then they'll need to be replaced. This is something i'd tell u to do if you were installin the stuff urself, but if you took it to a shop, u'd have to pay labour charges every time.
Sorry for thread jacking, but on the same topic, I am wondering where is a good place to get pads and rotor replace?
Subaru dealer wants to charge me a grand for 4 pads and rotors.
Is Midas any good? or is any other chain place that you recommand?
I am located in Calgary.
[OP]
Banned
May 5, 2003
4879 posts
30 upvotes
Toronto, Ontario
Thanks for the responses!

CT is selling Monroe pads for $60 whereas Honda sells their brand for $80.

I'm doing the work myself so labour is not an issue. Any have any comments regarding the Monroe pads? Any place else that I can buy them from?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 8, 2005
1566 posts
81 upvotes
Victoria
i use raybestos pads on my civic.. they cost abt $30 a pair and work great.
Jr. Member
Nov 9, 2003
129 posts
Toronto
wow, you guys don't machine rotors?

Only time I suggest my customers to replace rotors is if they're too thin to be machined, otherwise on the lathe they go. It's hardly ever that the customer comes back with a warped rotor either, say an average of 3-4 brake jobs a day, maybe 1% will have a problem down the road. A decent factory rotor that isn't run into the ground can handle two machinings no problem, mine are on their third without any problems.

I see considerably more problems with aftermarket rotors making noise and/or warping. Back when I used to work for a jobber (think auto parts warehouse) the common rotors we could get for $4-5, sell them to the shops for $20 a piece, and the shop would in turn sell them to the customer at whatever they wanted. A oem Honda rotor runs around $90...

Only rotor manufacturer that I've heard of that makes rotors to oem standards is Brembo. Same company as the performance stuff, but they make regular replacement parts as well. The price is similar to oem as well
TrEvOrLiCioUs wrote:Thermoquiets are good pads, we use them on customers cars alot at work.

I do recommend getting new rotors even if they are the cheap ones, it is far better than machining your rotors. I know honda pushes machining the rotors bcus they make more money that way.

Machining a pair of rotors usually cost around $30, a new pair is around $60-80+. + labour, which u get charged either way.

Machined rotors dont last long, they wrap very soon after bcus you are making the metal thiner and it becomes weaker and less able to retain/dispense heat. This is why at my shop we never recommend machining, even thou we would make more money doing it, 90% of the customers would be back within a month with wraped rotors. Add to the fact than they dont make em like they used to.....with newer cars rotors are becoming less thicker and less metal is availble to be machined off. Back in the olden days when rotors wieghed a ton and were a few inches thick it was ok to machine them.


If the rotors look good/not too rusted/no pitting and have a nice smooth surface, you may get away with just slapping a set of pads on and not machining them......if with the new pads u get a vibration while braking, then they'll need to be replaced. This is something i'd tell u to do if you were installin the stuff urself, but if you took it to a shop, u'd have to pay labour charges every time.

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