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Brexit: UK votes to leave the EU

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  • Jun 23rd, 2017 8:20 pm
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Deal Addict
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May 22, 2005
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What happened to the apocalyptic economic predictions?
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Dec 5, 2015
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spol wrote:
Jul 24th, 2016 4:50 pm
What happened to the apocalyptic economic predictions?
Already happening ...companies have cut investments and cut any expansion due to uncertainty ..

Economy is shrinking at fastest rate since 2009 and heading for recession
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/201 ... ng-and-se/

Also pound free fall is going to lead to inflation and tough times ahead
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GrandePike wrote:
Jul 24th, 2016 10:35 pm
Already happening ...companies have cut investments and cut any expansion due to uncertainty ..

Economy is shrinking at fastest rate since 2009 and heading for recession
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/201 ... ng-and-se/
Looks like it was already shrinking and was on a long term downtrend, but it went down at a faster rate.

Image
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spol wrote:
Jul 24th, 2016 11:37 pm
Looks like it was already shrinking and was on a long term downtrend, but it went down at a faster rate.

Image
Nope...brexit caused it to actually contract as in negative growth.. not simply slowing growth
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Feb 9, 2008
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spol wrote:
Jul 24th, 2016 11:37 pm
Looks like it was already shrinking and was on a long term downtrend, but it went down at a faster rate.
Britain's economy has been a fantasy for years, based primarily on selling houses to each other at ever-increasing prices.
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movieman wrote:
Jul 25th, 2016 11:19 am
Britain's economy has been a fantasy for years, based primarily on selling houses to each other at ever-increasing prices.
I wonder if it has anything to do with these super low interest rates. ;-)
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movieman wrote:
Jul 25th, 2016 11:19 am
Britain's economy has been a fantasy for years, based primarily on selling houses to each other at ever-increasing prices.
Well it was the financial trading hub for EU which kept it afloat... with brexit they aren't part of EU and obviously won't and can't be the financial center for it
Sr. Member
May 17, 2010
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EU needs Britian more then the UK needs them. Obviously there will be economic uncertainty until everything is sorted.

EU is already starting to bend on their free movement policy when it comes to staying in the single market.
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Jan 17, 2012
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As normal, the will if the people meams nothing. A "hairdresser" complained to the courts that Brexit cannot proceed without a parliamentary vote and the court agreed. 3 judges ruled that Brexit will need a vote on parliament before it is triggered.

Seems like a smart way for the courts to shut down Brexit without attacking the referendum...if they tried to invalidate the vote it would be seen as undemocratic so they have just separates the call for Brexit from the triggering of it. So to trigger Brexit the governmenr would need a seperate parliamentary approval meabing Brexit would likey not be triggered.

It is just judicial and political gamesmanship at the voters expense.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/uk- ... smsnnews11
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silky28 wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2016 2:02 pm
As normal, the will if the people meams nothing. A "hairdresser" complained to the courts that Brexit cannot proceed without a parliamentary vote and the court agreed. 3 judges ruled that Brexit will need a vote on parliament before it is triggered.
In the interest of accuracy,
Financial entrepreneur Gina Miller, a lead claimant in the case, said the lawsuit wasn't an attempt to stop Brexit — just to ensure that Parliament is sovereign.
Hairdresser Deir Santos is described as "another claimant".
Seems like a smart way for the courts to shut down Brexit without attacking the referendum...if they tried to invalidate the vote it would be seen as undemocratic so they have just separates the call for Brexit from the triggering of it. So to trigger Brexit the governmenr would need a seperate parliamentary approval meabing Brexit would likey not be triggered.
This doesn't seem to me to be much of a threat. The majority Conservatives have a prime minister who said she would have the UK leave the EU and, acording to the article the opposition supports implementing the referendum result.
Of course there is a mandate for leaving the EU, and we have to accept and respect the result of the referendum," the opposition Labour Party's Brexit spokesman, Keir Starmer, told the BBC. "But the terms, and how we leave the EU, are vitally important."
Earthlings, you're evicted.
You are not getting the damage deposit back.

God
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Apr 28, 2004
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As normal, you don't understand how democracy works. The governing party can't bypass Parliament by using a referendum. Same reason Al Gore lost the presidency, even though he won the popular vote 50,999,897 to 50,456,002.
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Nov 24, 2013
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Brexit is the UK equivalent of QC leaving Canada on a 50%+1 vote. It's always going to be a contentious issue, even with a victory in a "non-binding" referendum. Just like it would be in QC, the result is regionalized, so while the "UK" may want to Leave, the Scots, for example, would sooner leave the UK than the EU,

Image

Consent of Parliament to triggering Article 50 shouldn't be a barrier for the Tories. They have a strong majority that would presumably support their appointed PM. If there's a hangup, I'm guessing members don't want to go on record for one side over another. Cameron supported Remain but resigned. Johnson and Gove supported Leave, then disappeared when faced with the prospect of actually having to lead the UK through Brexit. Farage and UKIP can't get their shit together. Labour is overwhelmingly (though not universally) on the Remain side, and with its civil war settled should stick to that stance. Basically, everyone knows where the opposition stands, but the Tory schism leaves it up in the air whether they'd vote to invoke or not.

There's some irony in the unelected PM, who wouldn't dare call an early election despite the party shakeup, being the 'defender of democracy' in working to uphold the referendum result. I don't know what the right answer is. Would the result be the same if put to a second vote?
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Jan 17, 2012
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akira1971 wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2016 2:25 pm
As normal, you don't understand how democracy works. The governing party can't bypass Parliament by using a referendum. Same reason Al Gore lost the presidency, even though he won the popular vote 50,999,897 to 50,456,002.
Ad hominems generally work better when you don't make yourself look like an idiot in the process... you probably shouldn't be questioning what I know about parliamentary democracy when you clearly think the U.S. is one.

But your argument is also moronic for the referendum was conducted by an act of parliament. It wasn't just some random thing. The Conservative government promised they would hold a referendum on the EU, the proposed that referendum in parliament, and parliament approved it. So what will your argument be now? that a referendum is really only a survey to see what people say on a topic and with the results come no imperative to act?
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MexiCanuck wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2016 2:16 pm
silky28 wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2016 2:02 pm
As normal, the will if the people meams nothing. A "hairdresser" complained to the courts that Brexit cannot proceed without a parliamentary vote and the court agreed. 3 judges ruled that Brexit will need a vote on parliament before it is triggered.
In the interest of accuracy,
Financial entrepreneur Gina Miller, a lead claimant in the case, said the lawsuit wasn't an attempt to stop Brexit — just to ensure that Parliament is sovereign.
Hairdresser Deir Santos is described as "another claimant".
Seems like a smart way for the courts to shut down Brexit without attacking the referendum...if they tried to invalidate the vote it would be seen as undemocratic so they have just separates the call for Brexit from the triggering of it. So to trigger Brexit the governmenr would need a seperate parliamentary approval meabing Brexit would likey not be triggered.
This doesn't seem to me to be much of a threat. The majority Conservatives have a prime minister who said she would have the UK leave the EU and, acording to the article the opposition supports implementing the referendum result.
Of course there is a mandate for leaving the EU, and we have to accept and respect the result of the referendum," the opposition Labour Party's Brexit spokesman, Keir Starmer, told the BBC. "But the terms, and how we leave the EU, are vitally important."
Except for there are Conservative MPs that are against Brexit and only supported the referendum because they assumed it would fail. The bigger issue is that this is the court trying to stop an act of parliament by manipulating referendum.
Deal Guru
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Nov 15, 2004
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silky28 wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2016 4:08 pm
MexiCanuck wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2016 2:16 pm
silky28 wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2016 2:02 pm
As normal, the will if the people meams nothing. A "hairdresser" complained to the courts that Brexit cannot proceed without a parliamentary vote and the court agreed. 3 judges ruled that Brexit will need a vote on parliament before it is triggered.
In the interest of accuracy,
Financial entrepreneur Gina Miller, a lead claimant in the case, said the lawsuit wasn't an attempt to stop Brexit — just to ensure that Parliament is sovereign.
Hairdresser Deir Santos is described as "another claimant".
Seems like a smart way for the courts to shut down Brexit without attacking the referendum...if they tried to invalidate the vote it would be seen as undemocratic so they have just separates the call for Brexit from the triggering of it. So to trigger Brexit the governmenr would need a seperate parliamentary approval meabing Brexit would likey not be triggered.
This doesn't seem to me to be much of a threat. The majority Conservatives have a prime minister who said she would have the UK leave the EU and, acording to the article the opposition supports implementing the referendum result.
Of course there is a mandate for leaving the EU, and we have to accept and respect the result of the referendum," the opposition Labour Party's Brexit spokesman, Keir Starmer, told the BBC. "But the terms, and how we leave the EU, are vitally important."
Except for there are Conservative MPs that are against Brexit and only supported the referendum because they assumed it would fail. The bigger issue is that this is the court trying to stop an act of parliament by manipulating referendum.
This is the parliament voting on it. How are they trying to stop themselves?
Could HAVE, not could OF. What does 'could of' even mean?

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