Parenting & Family

Bringing kids to the dentist ... when?

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  • Aug 27th, 2007 1:28 am
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Jul 4, 2005
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Bringing kids to the dentist ... when?

Both myself and my wife have our annual check-up at the dentist. When should we start bringing the kids?
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Oct 10, 2006
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Our dentist started them just after their third birthday.

In the US, my friends' kids all went on their first b'day (which is what is recommended by the ADA)
See this button :confused: :confused: Learn how to use it PLEASE ;)
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3weddings wrote:
Jun 27th, 2007 8:17 pm
Our dentist started them just after their third birthday.

In the US, my friends' kids all went on their first b'day (which is what is recommended by the ADA)
agree
after 3
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Aug 22, 2003
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Usually as soon as they start to get their first teeth for a quick look around their mouth. We always took our kids with us when we went for checkups so they could watch us before it was time to have their first formal checkups.
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Oh, now I feel so imcompetent. :eek: We took ours at age 4 or 5.

No cabities. :cheesygri
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Dec 31, 2005
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3ish...

We were lucky, no problems. Not so with our son's friend...many cavities and a broken tooth...
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Feb 1, 2006
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3 is what I've been told as well, although we're planning on bringing our boys in early.
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Dec 22, 2006
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GTA
Normally the recommended age is 3. But check your child teeth visually yourself for any discoloration. We had to do treatment for our daugther when she was 2 (babies cavity)
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Dec 31, 2005
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interestingly, our son had discolouration on his teeth. The dentist took one look and said that our son had been premature. He was correct--one month premature. He indicated that the front teeth, are late to develop and the discolouration is an indication of stress during development...stress like being premature...
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Also - you should check with your local health unit, in case they offer a free service to introduce your child to dental care - in Alberta, our health unit offers a free checkup and cleaning from a dental hygienist for children who are around 3 years old. Once your child is older, you have to take them to the regular dentist.
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Oct 15, 2001
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nalababe wrote:
Jun 28th, 2007 11:11 pm
interestingly, our son had discolouration on his teeth. The dentist took one look and said that our son had been premature. He was correct--one month premature. He indicated that the front teeth, are late to develop and the discolouration is an indication of stress during development...stress like being premature...
The discolouration may be due to fluoride. I am just doing some research on fluoride, and I am looking for a reverse osmosis filter to filter the fluoride. Please do some research on fluoride yourself. I am not going to discuss fluoride here, otherwise, I will be flamed as "not believe in modern medicine" (witch hunt, :cheesygri ). BTW, fluoride has been added to water based on the 30's knowledge and technology.

Some link here,

http://www.fluoridealert.org/limeback.htm
Infants and toddlers are especially at risk for dental fluorosis of the front teeth since it is during the first 3 years of life that the permanent front teeth are the most sensitive to the effects of fluoride.
http://www.fluoridealert.org/news/1537.html
One of the most obvious living experiments today, Dr. Limeback believes, is a proof-positive comparison between any two Canadian cities. "Here in Toronto we've been fluoridating for 36 years. Yet Vancouver (which has never fluoridated) has a cavity rate lower than Toronto's."
My wife raised in Montreal and studied university at Waterloo (water is not drinkable in Waterloo and she drank bottled water). During her high school and university, she did not have any cavity. Only in Toronto she started to have cavity.
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Getmail - is there any kooky conspiracy theory that you WON'T buy into? :cheesygri
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getmail99 wrote:
Jul 1st, 2007 4:36 am
The discolouration may be due to fluoride. I am just doing some research on fluoride, and I am looking for a reverse osmosis filter to filter the fluoride. Please do some research on fluoride yourself. I am not going to discuss fluoride here, otherwise, I will be flamed as "not believe in modern medicine" (witch hunt, :cheesygri ). BTW, fluoride has been added to water based on the 30's knowledge and technology.
Nope not fluoride related....his teeth are pretty much perfect except for the discolouration....

"Once the teeth do come in, they may not be what you expected. Affecting as many as 70 percent of former preemies, a condition called enamel hypoplasia can leave teeth oddly shaped, discolored, and more prone to cavities and chipping.

Enamel defects in preemies are usually caused by severe stress when the enamel is forming, said Suzanne DeBall, DDS, PhD, an associate professor and director of pediatric dentistry at the Arizona School of Dentistry and Oral Health. In addition, it isn't yet possible to supply children born prematurely with the same quantities of enamel-building minerals - such as calcium and phosphorus - that they would have received during the last weeks of a full-term pregnancy."
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Aug 22, 2003
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And just to add gas to the fire, let's not forget some medications will cause discoloration to permanent teeth. Our 15 yr old has enamel malformation due to asthma meds he was on from 6 weeks old. It's very similar to the condition nalababe is describing but our's was not a preemie.
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jory29 wrote:
Jun 30th, 2007 1:57 pm
Also - you should check with your local health unit, in case they offer a free service to introduce your child to dental care - in Alberta, our health unit offers a free checkup and cleaning from a dental hygienist for children who are around 3 years old. Once your child is older, you have to take them to the regular dentist.
This is only available for low income people with no insurance.

As for dentists we went around 3/4 years old. We also are very careful about fluoride, surprise surprise :D

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